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2

I recommend getting Paizos "Flip-Mat." They're $14 and can be used with dry erase or wet erase. Other similar products also exist, such as Battlemat by Chessex. You can also make your own using a sheet of acrylic from the hardware store and the patience to draw a 1" grid on it (on the underside, so you can draw scenes on the other). Ask the players to state ...


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What I used to do: My battlemap was one of the old ones that we marked on with water soluble markers and had a 1" square grid superimposed on it. The players' figures were always on the map whether there was anything going on or not. When something arose that became a game scene, a quick sketch of the markers outlined where they were -- be it pub, ...


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I typically use non-combat mapping to help show the relative distances between things and the players. This is typically done using a "You are here" dot for the players and simple lines for relevant features. I even use notations on the map to denote distances given the map is often "not to scale". This means that I still build for a combat, but the players ...


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That's a good question. Because most of the material is copyrighted, people generally have personal libraries as it is frowned on to share other people's material. However, most of the good tile designers post there stuff all over the place, so for personal use, I doubt there's any issue, but you would need to do the trolling yourself. There's a few sites ...


3

Roll20 does that really well, using only your browser. You can use character sheets of many systems, and move tokens. You can restrict access for modifying or seeing token/sheet/handout player by player (or all at once), roll dices on the chat (to prevent cheating), use a fog of war, have several map (but only one at a time is show to the players), ... The ...


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When you say, "play by post", I assume you mean a forum-based game rather than a snail mail game, and that all players will have access to a web browser even though they may not be able to be online at the same time and may not be able to install software where they play. Given these conditions, I recommend... Google Draw It provides a good set of drawing ...


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Use an online spreadsheet. Format the cells to be squares, use colours to indicate terrain, and letters or words to tell where the goblins and player characters are. If you trust the players to not mess up or cheat (and you presumably do, since you play with them), you can give them editing privileges so they can make their own moves. Or you can have the ...


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You can use any map software (like Maptools or Photoshop) to create the maps on your side, including token positioning, then upload the result image to an external site (like Imgur) and use the [img] tag that is allowed in most php forums. A player can post something like “I will move 1 square in the NE direction and attack the monster”, and when the DM ...


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Quite frankly, Roll20 is as easy or hard as you like. Just drag and drop images and draw right on the tabletop if you want. Give each player a token, use a blank background and hex overlay and you are set. You can draw away. You don't need to use the sounds, dice roller, etc. It will keep your map from game to game and you can open separate maps for ...



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