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2

Spell checks wich squares it can "shoot" into just like you would would you be standing there, at the point of origin with a bow (assuming that bow has range of 30' with no increment). In the given example you may shoot at any square with a pink(?) dot without hindrance while anything in the squares with blue and violet dots has cover. Spell affects just ...


13

Draw lines through corners. None of your examples seem correct to me. While almost everyone uses area templates, the rules specify that you have to draw lines out from the chosen center point until you hit an obstruction or reach the limit of the effect’s radius. These are known as lines of effect, and are actual, geometrical, 1-dimensional lines, not ...


3

You could use "Secret ink glasses" : you mark the traps on the map with invisible ink, then put the glasses on, and you're the only one that can see traps ! Pretty fun ;) It's called polarizing ink, you can see an example here : Polarizing ink and glasse video example - Youtube


3

A very simple approach, which I'm surprised no one has suggested yet, is to simply not decide in advance. Say there are 100 squares, and you want to have 10 traps. So whenever a PC moves to a square they have not been on before, roll a d20, and on a 1 or 2 they stepped on a trap. Problem solved! Or say there are 5 pit traps and 10 spike traps. Now 1 or 2 ...


1

While Erik has an excellent idea I think it should be taken farther: Once someone gets the idea that the floor markings are the guide it's simple enough to only step on squares with a symbol a kobold stepped on, or on squares which it's apparent a kobold must step on because they have no choice at that point. (A kobold retreats into the room, the symbol on ...


0

The easiest way to do this with the least amount of prep time and game time is to use Roll20 and note the squares where traps are located using the drawing feature and the GM information overlay (which is invisible to the users). I frequently use this for things like trip wires, pit traps, falling stalactites, snares, etcetera. Pros: You don't have to ...


8

I've used a "Minesweeper" strategy for this to good effect. To use @Lunin's example: |T 3 T| | T | |T 4 T| | T | |T 4 T| | T ========= |T 4 T T T | T 4 T 4 T 4 T |T 3 T T T =============== Instead of the numbers, I drew a star-like pattern with a point pointing toward a trap (and a dot in the center if that square was ...


1

Assign coordinates to your map. Mark one side with letters and one side with numbers. Track, in your gm notes, which squares have traps. For example: E8: Snare G6: Pitfall Alternatively, use graphing paper as a smaller representation of the map in your notes, and mark the traps and other hidden things on there. Just cross reference as you play.


58

How do the Kobolds remember which parts are trapped? Basically, this answer is about weaving the Kobold's own marking system into the narrative. It does assume you draw your own maps and don't use Dungeon Tiles or anything. Obtain 6 or so pretty looking symbols (they don't need to have meaning, but if they look Draconic it's bonus awesome) Mark every ...


15

This answer basically trades significant amounts of out-of-game prep-time in order to save in-game play-time. For a variety of reasons (but mostly because it’s horribly tedious), I have only used it a few times. The idea is to mark traps on the grid, and then cut up post-it notes and cover the markings. Have to make sure you have sufficiently-opaque post-it ...


11

I did something like this for a specific large passage in a dungeon in my game, the solution that worked well for me was to have trap placement dictated by a hidden pattern At first it might seem like this would be too obvious, but you'd be surprised how difficult it is to work out a pattern when you don't even know if there is a pattern in the first place, ...


3

Not trying to sidestep your question, but I think your goal can be accomplished without tracking each square. Track "Zones" In your notes, you could identify areas of the map that contain certain kinds of traps without specifying where exactly on the grid the trap is. When someone passes through a zone, just assign the trap a specific square. This might ...


2

I would consider marking each square with something, both the trapped and untrapped. You could also tie this visual to a feature, basically say "The blue dots denote the number of shallow pools of water, the dot is a pool, the blue is water. The dash means a tree root, the green means it is covered in ivy." Or whatever, but the idea is you could weave ...


0

Track which squares are not trapped. Unexplored squares then could be either trapped or not trapped (Schrödinger's trap?) depending on who steps on them first. Shaping the battle map to more or less suggest the path, like this stalactite to that stalactite, would be much easier than trying to memorize a couple dozen nearly arbitrary coordinates.


0

It's a bit of a hack, but this has proven useful in the past when playing remote sessions: We used Google shared docs --> More specifically we used the MS-Word-like text editor. It allows to: Add/overlay images Add simple shapes, and move those around The shapes can be used for very simple 'drawings' (comparable to the simple drawing tool in MS Word) ...



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