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19

Value Proposition You mentioned DDI: Even better is the WotC approach with the DDI, you can look up any monster or item or (almost any) rule, in the most recent form, for 3 years at the cost of seven books. I think this is the way to go, even considering the horribly slow character builder. It's true, for three years that is a good deal. But ...


16

The benefits for owning a book are the same reasons we still have books, and why people still buy books instead of a Kindle or PDFs. The advantage of books comes down to something basic: interacting with them is different to interacting with e-readers, and in the better for a lot of ways. Let's consider the case of a single user, with access to a single ...


15

Actually, and technically, Yes. The second printing DOES contain those two mythos. It is every subsequent printing that does not contain them. For the first 1980 printing, TSR obtained permission from Michael Moorcock for inclusion of Melnibonéan material (from his Elric series of books). The Cthulhu Mythos was believed to be in the public domain, so ...


13

The Serenity Role Playing Game book is a complete game in and of itself. It's the "core rules" for the Serenity game. You don't need the Cortex System book, and in fact, due to differences between the two, it's only going to confuse things. You probably should get the Big Damn Heroes Handbook. The rules and setting expansion it provides is worth the money. ...


12

No, going by the first amazon review the board game is a 4.0 product, and therefore it cannot be the same as the 3.5 Castle Ravenloft book.


12

Most of the books I've purchased have been used, and purchased from eBay. I seem to have the habit of getting very interested in out of print games :) Wait for a reprint? Will that happen? Once a system has been out of print for a while, it becomes practically unheard of for a reprint to happen. The odds are good that if the property has any remaining ...


12

The issues involved preclude a simple "yes or no" answer; it's a qualified "It's a bit too early to tell." The various eBook devices are almost all 6-7" diagonal... A few are 10" diagonal. Format Types and Issues The various ebooks to be read on them comprise several different formats. Scanned Image PDFusually print poorly but legibly, non-searchable, ...


10

Edit: I've been informed that High Tech goes up to TL8, and Ultra Tech starts at TL9... I assume that the 4e version differs from the 3e version in that respect. Modern technology is Tech Level 7; near-future would be TL8 technology. If you want a very-near-future campaign, you might mix TL7 technology with elements from TL8 (organ transplant, bionic ...


10

I buy paper books because: I can lend the latest player in my group a paper book far easier than I can something on my Kindle. At game time, players on the table can browse different physical books, if they are all on my kindle then we can only look at one at a time. Somewhat related to the above, i find it easier to cross reference physical books than I ...


8

There's a rule for this! Some 3.0 content is still 'current' for 3.5. The official rule from Wizards of the Coast is that any content that didn't get updated (that is, printed into a new 3.5 book) is still valid and is thus usable with 3.5. Oriental Adventures and Manual of the Planes are indeed two such books, requiring only minor adjustments to the skill ...


8

In a short acronym: DRM. Paper copies have none. Kindle is riddled with it thanks to Amazon's strategy. DRM takes your rights and freedom away. Of course, you can get ebooks that are DRM-free (for example Posthuman Studio's Eclipse Phase) but they are few and far between.


8

I own an ebook, and I find it more comfortable linear reading than in physical books. Also, it's very handy when looking for exact words. But I find flipping the pages looking for something that is not bookmarked or you don't know exactly where it is, (and you don't know what words look for) or doing diagonal reading on several pages much easier in physical ...


7

You may want to check out the Transhuman Space books. Very different feel from the Ultra-Tech / Space. Although some of the pieces of technology are high-tech, it feels a lot more realistic than the Space / Ultra-tech options. As far as I know, Transhuman Space is 3e.


7

No. The books are not updated; if you buy them, you are expected take care of the updates yourself, by perusing the official rule update PDFs. The alternative used to be simple: buy a subscription to D&D Insider. However, with the fifth edition coming soon, who knows how long they will keep the 4e sites running...


6

Player’s Handbook and Player’s Handbook II are different books, with basically no overlapping content. Player’s Handbook II is basically a “sequel” to the Player’s Handbook. The differences between the Player’s Handbook and Premium Players’s Handbook are slight, however. If you are looking at buying some of ...


6

When we started playing 4e (and were similarly inexperienced with it) there was no character builder online and we only had two Player's Handbooks to share among six people. During play this worked just fine. The biggest challenge was when initially making characters – it took longer than necessary because people were frequently stuck waiting for someone ...


6

Even if right now at the gaming table, it does not seem to matter, books manage what technical devices can not: books can store memories. I have roleplaying books on my shelf that have stains on and in them from funny adventures way back in time. I can open that book, look at the wax, coke and crisps stains and remember that one night when we finally slew ...


6

Something I would like to add: Document layout Books usually come in a 2-columned, A4 or letter format with a lot of pictures, text boxes and a fancy background. Sometimes all of this has a poor contrast even as a real book (mostly due to the fancy backgrounds). An e-book has to work for different screen sizes and at best populates pages dynamically (no ...


5

No. Those questions aren't answered in any book that I know of. However, I would use the 1st rule of role-playing games: Have fun Albeit the SR4A rules are pretty complete, those corner cases aren't covered for good reason: One cannot anticipate everything. Therefore it should be up to the story-teller if those works, and it should serve the purpose of ...


5

eMy group has been playing for over year with virtually no books at all. We have a few books around, but most of our players have not bought any. DDI provides everything we need. The character builder allows us to build our characters without access to source books. The Compendium has most of the rules material already in place, it leaves you needing ...


5

You can probably find unused editions online, or in RPG stores that never sold them in the first place, but why not buy used? At least here in Austin, we have about 12 Half Price Books locations which have RPG sections; you can look and make sure the previous owner didn't use it as a sneeze shield or whatever. If you're looking to use it instead of just have ...


4

WFRP 1E - Games Workshop and Hogshead Productions WFRP 1E comprises 3+ printings. GW 1st Printing, Hardcover. Major errata issues GW 2nd Printing, Softcover. Minor errata issues; most of the 1st ed 1st printing errors got fixed. GW may or may not have run a 3rd printing, but if they did, it was using the same plates. HHP Printings, softcover. Exact ...


4

Yes and No The money you save and the ability to get a RPG supplement or book right now are both significant factors lending to the Yes portion of this answer. There are however some down sides that I've noticed. I'll break out some Pros and Cons (when I say PDF here, I generally also mean eBook, I just don't want to have to type both over and over): Pros ...


4

Sure it's practical, but I've found them to be better for supplements rather than core books I've purchased several eBooks myself. There are good parts and bad parts. In general these are the major upsides (At least for the well made ones): Searchable Easy to use index/TOC Selectable text for copy and pasting Electronic portability (You can move the files ...


4

I am pretty sure you can easily play with just one copy of the books. In a group with experienced players and DM you can even play without referring to books at all if there are notes regarding the monsters and challenges for the DM. My assumption would be that you don't need extra copies of the same books. Just make sure the players have read and do know ...


4

In addition to the excellent answers above, another factor that I can see is that dead-tree books IMHO relate better in feeling to their contents (at least for fantasy RPG, maybe not so much for sci-fi?). What I mean by that is that often times the fantasy worlds that people play in are inspired by the technological state of the art of about late Medieval ...


4

As others have said - there's definitely something to be said about tactile navigation. While digital formats (assuming they're text-parseable) can be searched, if you don't know the specific spelling or the specific term, they can be difficult to parse by hand. Quadruply so if the publisher did not provide bookmarks to the different chapters. (Which is ...


4

There doesn't seem to be a formal god of kender specifically, but some sources ascribe divinity to a figure named Uncle Trapspringer. He's referenced in the Notable Kender section on Wikipedia, and the Kencyclopedia (I'm not making that up) homebrews 2nd-edition-style specialty priests for priests who revere Uncle Trapspringer. An entire book, Tales of Uncle ...


3

Warhammer Fantasy RP First Edition is called Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay or, retroactively, Warhammer Fantasy RP First Edition. As such, including First Edition is likely to be your best bet. The Hogshead edition is merely a reprint by a separate company. It's worth knowing that second edition was a change on the level of D&D 3.0 to D&D 3.5, a lot of ...


3

A quick Google search found this article, attribute to Gygax in 1976. This link says the article originated in The Strategic Review issue 6. The Wiki entry on Dragon says that The Strategic Review stopped publication in 1976. This entry dates Arduin to 1977, so D&D was certainly the first of the two by this evidence. Gygax credits Moorcock and Anderson ...



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