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Pathfinder does not follow the three-book PHB/DMG/MM tradition that D&D does. Although PF's Bestiary series serves the same purpose as D&D's Monster Manuals, PF's Core Rulebook is more like a combination of D&D's PHB and DMG, as opposed to being analogous to the PHB alone. You can certainly use the fluff from 3.5e's DMG if you wish. You can even ...


-1

Another partial no. D&D in particular has had negative response from publishing updated books. This is already difficult between major revisions, but the update between 3.0 and 3.5 was poorly received. This is one of the reasons they don't want to update the core books too often. They do seem to be coming out with various confusing boxed sets though, ...


1

While the back cover explicitly states, "All the rules of the game..." it is in fact not, all the rules in the game. The fine print does explain that a bit though. In many cases, there was a rule in the "core" books that was expanded on, made more explicit or otherwise changed in a companion book. For example, Complete Adventurer added numerous "expanded ...


11

You only need the Pathfinder Core Rulebook to run a game. The GMG is not the equivalent of the old DMGs; the core rulebook is basically PHB+DMG. The GMG has help, additional rules, advice, NPCs, etc. You do not need the 3.5e DMG either. You can see a lot of the content (specifically the rules content) of both the CRB and the GMG on the PRD site to compare ...


6

Yes, You Need All Of Those The Rules Compendium is a collection of rules. It doesn't have class information (PHB), Magic Items, Prestige Classes, or world building stuff (DMG), and has no monster stats (MM). You can replace those with the SRD if you feel like it, but some source of that stuff is required. So What's It Good For? It's handy if you are ...


4

Having a physical book vs using free rules or a pdf When you are a new player, or a GM with new players, the ability to have a physical object which contains the rules and classes is invaluable. When being bombarded with new concepts, people will generally be much happier with a pretty-looking book that contains evocative pictures and 'wordiness' and the ...


7

Most of the actual rules are listed in the online PRD. Most of the thematic stuff and deities (important for clerics) are not listed online and are copyrighted material. Most of what is not online, as you put it, is just "wordiness and pretty pictures". That being said, the PDF is available online directly from Paizo for only $10 (contrasted against $50) ...


0

When you're building a dungeon, you are designing a level for a game. A good starting place is to read articles and books about level design written by professional game developers. Here are some recommendations to get you started: Beginning Level Design, Part 1 Beginning Level Design, Part 2 Ten Principles of Good Level Design (Part 1) Ten Principles of ...


1

TSR wrote a how-to book for 1st Edition AD&D back in the 1980's: The Dungeoneer's Survival Guide. It includes specific guidelines for creating dungeons, and guidelines for drawing them. It's available electronically. Most of the content is applicable to any edition of D&D; about 1/4 is specific to AD&D 1E, and only about 1/3 is actually rules ...


4

Two possibilities that come to mind are an article from a series by "The Architect DM" and the AD&D book "Dungeon Builder's Guidebook" by Bruce Cordell. The first of those two is a series of articles you can find on the Critical Hits blog with the specific article being found here. The other I bought many years ago, but Amazon appears to have links to ...


2

Any books I could find directly related to dungeon design were outdated/out of print. As such I'm going to give you general tips and advice for dungeon design. Take inspiration from other Media Think about Moria in LOTR or an ancient temple in any of the Indiana Jones movies. These locations/setpeices were exciting and engaging to a passive audience ...



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