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16

You have stumbled on the issue (or a primary issue) that prompted the development of the gumshoe system. GUMSHOE is used for a number of games with investigative elements, including Trail of Cthulhu, a GUMSHOE implementation of CoC and Night's Black Agents, a spies-vs-vampires setting with a more militaristic bent. By extension, the solution adopted may work ...


8

True horror requires player buy in, characters with powerful motivations, a willingness to be less than powerful, and a willingness to make the wrong choices for drama. All it takes is one computational demonologist or heroic soldier and all the "bad decisions" go out the window in favour of "let's shoot the big green monster until it stops making us crazy." ...


7

Safety in numbers only applies if you can trust the others Are you familiar with the game Werewolves of Millers Hollow? If not; it's basically a game you play with 10-20 people. Each person is either a citizen or a werewolf. The game is divided in "night" where people close their eyes and the werewolves secretly pick a victim who leaves the game and a ...


7

Player knowledge is based on the fact that once you put the book for Cthulu on the table, people will expect this adventure to be about Cthulu. Surprise them. Play adventures that on the outside seem to be mysterious but turn out to be normal life. Play adventures that look like normal life but have horror right where they don't expect it. Now, to do ...


5

Experiment It's a bit like cooking. If you want to serve a new meal and you don't have any new ingredients, try different mixtures or techniques to change the flavour. Have the characters explore new, unprecedented combinations of monsters. Maybe the Elder Ones decided to ally themselves with Nyarlathotep? You can also change the pace and genre of the game ...


5

There isn't much to know. Magic in Call of Cthulhu is not something that the player characters deal with much, if at all, since using magic usually means the end of the character: Some characters will learn little bits of ritual magic during their time investigating the dark places of Earth. These spells tend to be very narrow, fairly powerful, and ...


3

As this remains a live question, physical copies of Call of Cthulhu 7th edition continue to elude enthusiasts, backers and the general gaming population. At time of writing, Rick Meints - President of Chaosium - states that: backers will be getting [...] items [from the Kickstarter] in their first shipment that will ship in 2015 This includes: ...


3

I think you think you have a problem you don't actually have. Pretty much any genre can be boiled down in the same manner you boiled down CoC. (e.g. Fantasy ends with "kill the baddie, get the reward".) Just because something is iterative doesn't mean that it also can't be varied. That said, let's try and work with practical advise to vary up the feel of ...


2

If you are running a one-shot (which may run over two or three sessions), then I am afraid the only practical outcomes are success or failure: the fortunate Investigators return to their former lives, sadder and wiser and with a few stories to tell to the few who may believe them. But a long-term campaign needs to touch on the wide scope of the evil ...


2

Call of Cthulu, and by extension Delta Green, are horror games. They're not about strong heroes overcoming evil, it's about getting by with your wits, luck, and the skin of your teeth (or not). Call of Cthulu is as much about failure as it is about success, and as the DM it should be your duty to simply resolve the player's actions, not send them down the ...


2

Since you've specified this as system agnostic this is really just a logistics problem that boils down to "How do 3 people manage 20 people?" So we'll focus on minimizing downtime and maximizing engagement with a minimum of effort. As far as background I've run multiple con events that involved 100+ people in rotating tables and recurring multi-day ...


2

Yes you can get away without purchasing it. Covered by Quickstart rules: Character creation Skill checks Basic Sanity mechanics Basic Combat mechanics Basic Damage & healing mechanics Covered by 5th edition core book Skill descriptions Full Sanity mechanics (regaining sanity through therapy, ...) More Combat factors, such as cover and lightning ...


2

With reference to Luck rolls (based on Call of Cthulhu 7th Edition rules, which the authors intentionally wrote as compatible with all previous editions), the relevant ruling lies on p90 of the Keeper's Rulebook: If the Keeper calls for a Group Luck roll, the player whose investigator has the lowest Luck score (amongst those present in the scene) ...


1

As far as I know, there aren't any rules for group rolls in Call of Cthulhu. And that makes sense, as it's not possible/logical for someone to hide "on behalf" of the rest of the party (although I recall that in 5th edition at least, Conceal can be used to hide someone/something). The idiot with the air horn is going to draw attention to himself regardless ...


1

The integrity rules from the God-Machine Chronicle Rules Update could be a good substitute for CoC sanity. Unlike the previous morality system that is based purely on sins (which the developers for GMC often refer to as a Victorian concept) , this system is based on breaking points, and seeing cosmic horrors is a perfect example of that. If you fail ...


1

The answer by Skiptron pretty much hits all the high points. I'd like to add a couple of things to it though. IRL Time Planning Knowing that a break is coming will help prevent constant interruptions by players leaving the gaming area. It also gives the GM a chance to take a deep breath, gather their thoughts, and figure out what direction they are going ...



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