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66

Powerful drama requires powerful motivations. When everyone at the table agrees that they want a Horror game, they must craft their characters around these motivations. If they don't buy in, then you get the kind of power-fantasy where the heroes do the quite sensible thing of feeding Cthulhu a couple cases of dynamite and legging it. That isn't horror, ...


26

Cultists don't let themselves be taken alive Their madness means surrender will not happen. Even if you manage to knock one out and capture them without killing them, what is to stop them from trying to attack the players again and again. Straight jackets and muzzles are used on dangerous prisoners and psychotics for a reason. Even if they accept their ...


24

I think you're metagaming. You, the GM and player, know that continuing to pursue the truth will lead to madness. Your characters don't know that. They don't know the risks yet. Your characters are just finding out (possibly for the first time) that "magic" or something like it is real. If you, in real life, just found out that magic was real, wouldn't you ...


18

There are different editions of Masks and I don't know the differences between them, but in the one I have the cultists have, respectively: English 10%, Mythos 3% English 55%, Mythos 4%, a "New Yorker cocaine fiend of negligible skills" English 1%, Mythos 5% There's only so much information they could give up even if they wanted to, which they don't. ...


15

You have stumbled on the issue (or a primary issue) that prompted the development of the gumshoe system. GUMSHOE is used for a number of games with investigative elements, including Trail of Cthulhu, a GUMSHOE implementation of CoC and Night's Black Agents, a spies-vs-vampires setting with a more militaristic bent. By extension, the solution adopted may work ...


14

In addition to the excellent answers already posted, let me suggest that you look at the kinds of protagonists that Lovecraft wrote about; police investigators ("The Call of Cthulhu", "The Horror at Red Hook"), artists looking for unique experiences ("Pickman's Model"), and people who actually wanted to find out more about the squiggly things under the bed ...


13

You are making two assumptions: First, that the cultists are sane. They are not. they are insane. Second, that the cultists know what is going on. Again, they are insane and may not have been told anything of use apart from "Go there, kill this block, and anyone who gets in your way". However, if the players go to the trouble of having their character ...


12

It's a good idea to make sure everyone in the group understands what the point of the game is about, so they can build appropriate characters. Sometimes people go in building "survivalist" characters, which means the motivations also don't fit the genre expectations. It's also important to remember that the key point of horror stories is some point of ...


9

Instead of trimming down and modifying systems that are designed for playstyles you're not interested in, consider using a game system that's already doing what you want. BRP and CoC assume combat, and are generally geared toward multi-session campaigns. It's possible to hack them into compliance with your needs, but that's gonna take some effort. Even ...


7

I love all the info Runeslinger has provided but I respectfully beg to differ. There is a simple answer here: No You do not need to play CoC before playing A!C. You will, however, need more than just the two core books to start. The books seem to support at least 3 systems - Fate Core, Savage Worlds, and Call of Cthulhu 6th edition. You will need to get ...


5

Player knowledge is based on the fact that once you put the book for Cthulu on the table, people will expect this adventure to be about Cthulu. Surprise them. Play adventures that on the outside seem to be mysterious but turn out to be normal life. Play adventures that look like normal life but have horror right where they don't expect it. Now, to do ...


5

Experiment It's a bit like cooking. If you want to serve a new meal and you don't have any new ingredients, try different mixtures or techniques to change the flavour. Have the characters explore new, unprecedented combinations of monsters. Maybe the Elder Ones decided to ally themselves with Nyarlathotep? You can also change the pace and genre of the game ...


4

Outside Forces I'm not familiar with the specific scenario, but in a capture event if a semi-mad cultist was about to 'spill the beans', perhaps the elder forces he was devoted to might intervene themselves, speak a few words from the captive's mouth (in their voice not his) as his eyes roll back into his head and his neck contorts and snaps of its own ...


4

Disclaimer: this is a somewhat generic answer, not specific to this scenario (which I don't know). They aren't clerks, they are cultists for a reason. It's entirely reasonable to expect them to suicide (or mutilate), endure (or enjoy!) torture, or simply being unable to be useful due to their insanity. So, suicide is boring? Have them cut their own ...


3

Contrasting @BESW's opinion somewhat, I'd say the answer to your core question, namely: "what other rules do I absolutely need to run a traditional CoC game?", is, simply: None. You don't need any other rules besides the obligatory skill checks (have a skill of 0-99, roll d100, if the result is equal or smaller than your skill rating, you succeed, if not, ...


3

I think you think you have a problem you don't actually have. Pretty much any genre can be boiled down in the same manner you boiled down CoC. (e.g. Fantasy ends with "kill the baddie, get the reward".) Just because something is iterative doesn't mean that it also can't be varied. That said, let's try and work with practical advise to vary up the feel of ...


2

If you are running a one-shot (which may run over two or three sessions), then I am afraid the only practical outcomes are success or failure: the fortunate Investigators return to their former lives, sadder and wiser and with a few stories to tell to the few who may believe them. But a long-term campaign needs to touch on the wide scope of the evil ...


2

Call of Cthulu, and by extension Delta Green, are horror games. They're not about strong heroes overcoming evil, it's about getting by with your wits, luck, and the skin of your teeth (or not). Call of Cthulu is as much about failure as it is about success, and as the DM it should be your duty to simply resolve the player's actions, not send them down the ...


1

I think it's best not to force anything. It seems unnecessary and ultimately undermines the logic of the situation and its dramatic effect and immersion. As a player, I would come up with clear understandable motivations that make sense and yet can get the character hooked into the scenario. Then I would discuss with the GM to see if the GM finds them ...


1

What is needed to play or run the game? Player As a player, the Player's Guide should suffice if you are familiar with the system that your group is using. At present, Achtung! Cthulhu has versions for Call of Cthulhu and Savage Worlds (these are presented together as a dual-system set), PDQ, and Fate. If you are not familiar with the system, having access ...



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