Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

MOP Every NPC needs a mop. Motivation: Why is the character here in the story? What motivates them to act? Objective: What does the character want to accomplish as a goal in the story? What is the character's overriding goal they must achieve? Personality: How the character acts as well as their personal appearance. These three traits help define an ...


2

Having run a fairly long running gameworld that involved ... lots of games with 'whoever turned up' and GM swapping. The most satisfactory method we found was to set up a game world that was suited for short-ish adventures in said gameworld rather than an ongoing dungeon crawl We could - and did - develop ongoing plot, recurring characters and themes ...


1

You are not forced to play it as it is written If a published adventure turns out to be boring, and to me it happened a lot of times, you can always edit it as you want without telling your PCs. Keep in mind that if their characters are interested in the story even their players will be. So how can you edit a story to make it more interesting? Don't ...


1

Summon individual heroes based on participation Have each of the people who has the ability to participate in your game roll up a character and create a small one-shot campaign whenever any of them choose to show up to the club to play the game. Normally dungeon crawls are best for this. Heroes are summoned as mediators in a conflict by a group of summoners ...


1

It is important to bear in mind what makes the PCs different from the NPCs, aside from the obvious fact of player vs non-player. In short, the PCs are the protagonists, and the NPCs aren't. In my games, even if the PCs don't start out in this position, and even if the plot does not take on epic world-spanning dimensions, the PCs are Luke Skywalkers, the ...


1

Play the NPCs as characters. Give them motivations, goals, principles, and so on. Not every NPC has to be very detailed, but you should be able to make up something on the spot to give depth to NPCs. Be ready to take notes - maybe on the spot, you have a secondary character say that they're a refugee from the valley to the east - write it down. Make the ...


1

I tend to run a good number of one shot games, so I have quite a bit of experience with it. A known setting or genre It helps a lot if you start with a setting or genre the players are familiar with. For this reason, in the US at least, superhero games are pretty easy to use and pick up and play - most people are familiar with superheroes and the genre ...


1

Keep it simple. Avoid a long, complex series of events; that's not to say it cannot be witty, but try to avoid convoluted solutions. Keep it focused. Aim for depth, not breadth. There is no need to explain every aspect of the world and all of its politics. Explain in detail the setting the characters are in. Try to keep details that do not add to the ...


1

HoL is perfectly playable as an ongoing campaign. It is one of my favorite all time inspirations in roleplaying, if in nothing else, how bizarre sourcebooks can be. There is a certain dystopian nuance to HoL that can be woven into other systems and campaigns. They can go two ways, one is light hearted, the other is very, very grim. I second the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible