Hot answers tagged

58

For your players Use other solutions Intelligence is only one of 3 mental stats, and the one that refers mostly to book-learning, puzzling, connection-making and thinking stuff through. However, lacking it doesn't make you a bumbling fool; it makes you someone who solves problems in other ways. For example, if it's crucial that the characters know who ...


42

Megadungeon All sessions start in the village. At any time when not in peril and the party knows the way back the party can declare that they return to the village - this ends the session. If the session time expires before they return, roll on the "What really bad thing happens to my PC while returning to the village" table. Shamelessly nicked from ...


28

The Government has no time for small fries like you Technocracy appears to be a monolithic Big Brother, spying on everyone at all times, but the truth is that their goals can leave even the best among them strained. Even the most oppressive governments are loath to devote precious resources (people, equipment, processor time) to small threats. In fact, such ...


18

Arcanist, Sorcerer, and Wizard are three of the most dominatingly-powerful classes in the game Each of these classes, built right, can do just about anything, and in many cases can do very close to everything. The spell list they have access to is the best in the game, and spellcasting is the best class feature in the game. These three can nullify a huge ...


18

Erik's answer is a great general solution to your problem, but there are a couple of specific tactics you can use here as well. Put Your Eggs in More Baskets Right now, you're relying on a single skill or small group of skills in order to give your players information about the game world. This is naturally going to lead to situations where nobody has the ...


17

I can't say whether this, on its own, will change your players reactions (at the end of the day, gold is just another number on their character sheets). Certainly, I know it wouldn't interest most of mine - They'd just think "Oh, hey, our riches are 90% easier to carry, now," because assuming easy access to money-changers, the only thing you're really ...


17

Disclaimer: I actually play in a campaign that is now 1 year old and where it is frequent to have one missing player regularly (if more than one, we do not play); I would actually say that we have had more sessions with an incomplete attendance than sessions with a complete attendance. It is possible to have a long running campaign with spotty attendance, ...


15

I'm going to offer a suggestion contradicting one of your requirements, as in my opinion it can still benefit you. Naturally, you may not find it useful after all. Some stories come to an end, others change. Your characters have transcended being adventurers and carved out a place for themselves. Good for them! It is a great example of worldbuilding if you ...


14

Devil's Advocate Answer: Treat this as a high DC ability/skill check, not an opposed check. For all intents and purposes, it is simply much easier to set DC checks by the handy guide reference (in PHB, p. 174) and then have the party/PCs try to make that check, rather than spend the time and effort to workup NPC skills and then spend more time doing ...


13

GURPS is a pretty good ruleset for the kind of game you describe. It's got good rules for pretty much everything, and the pointscale that the system is built on works pretty well for a game where it's assumed that people will have guns. I'll go through each of the requirements you list, and how well GURPS deals with it. "roughly equivalent to earth ...


13

I always prefer to solve this problem inside the story. Just an example: The PCs are all bound together by a magical tattoo they each bear. They are the Chosen agents of an unknown (or known, for that matter) powerful entity. For reasons only clear to this entity, a PC may just disappear in a puff of thick smoke. Sometimes another PC appears in his/her ...


11

Edits to the question since this answer was first posted have made it clear the the asker is using a simulationist approach to managing coins. By this I mean that the number of each specific type of coin is tracked, rather than the aggregate value, that the weight of the coins is taken into account, and being able to exchange currency is dependent upon your ...


11

It’s purely up to you and your players; there is no “should” here. Many campaigns start with a “session 0” where people discuss their characters, and whether or not any of them know any of the others. Typically DMs merely set a time and place, and tell players “make sure your character has a good reason to be here when the story starts,” or something along ...


11

Hint it and measure enthousiasm The general approach I take when I'm not sure what my players like, or whether they'd enjoy a specific thing, is to hint to it during the session and see if they bite. This works best in an open world or if you've already taught your players that they can say "no" and the story will go on, but even if they're used to being ...


11

The political and legal proceedings in a surveillance/military state are often quite opaque in real life. You can use that as your cue to build a framework that is oppressive and capricious. Think of the legal system as merely the justification for paramilitary surveillance and interrogations. The characters notice unmarked vehicles and suspicious people ...


9

Politics most of the time don't involve simply staying in one place. To be a good governor you often have to keep good relations with your neighbors and rising powers, so that you don't end up trampled between one war or another. Due to that, going and throwing balls, feasts and parts are an important aspect of maintaining the land. Court politics on the ...


9

One side-effect of increasing value of single gps may be unintended. The physical size of a pile of gold treasure would be smaller for the same value. There is less visual impact to "riches beyond your wildest dreams", because there is less to see. Or it is all in cheaper metals, lessening the impact. Whether or not this affects your game depends on how ...


9

There are no published 5e Forgotten Realms supplements as of yet, and they have changed the Realms a good bit with each new edition. If you don't care about "keeping up with the new timeline," the most supported classic starting location is far and away: Shadowdale Sourcebook and Adventure Coverage This town in the Dalelands is given some detail in the ...


9

You're over-estimating the impact entirely, yes. The assumption that advancement in Monster of the Week is a matter of increasing power isn't correct. In the vast majority of Apocalypse World engine games, advancement isn't climbing, zero-to-hero Campbellian stuff. Monster of the Week is no exception. Instead, advancement is largely outwards and only ...


8

Savage Worlds is certainly capable of playing in a world and genre-hopping campaign (I suspect that's partly because Torg, which is all about this, is Shane Lacy Hensley's favorite setting of all time). However, there are a couple of things that you need to keep in mind. First, character content from one setting is generally not created with the intension ...


8

From a game mechanics point of view it should make no difference. From a role playing point of view it may or may not make a difference. If you seriously want to immerse yourselves in the weird and wonderful ways of real coinage (as opposed to what we use which is coins as monetary tokens) you may be better off by building your own system (or stealing ...


8

You could easily change the sp-value of a gold piece without changing the prices for gold jewelry or the like. When thinking about a gold piece like we know them from images/movies/books we generally imagine a big coin maybe an 3 centimeters/1 inch in diameter and some millimeters thick... Historic gold pieces however, were often very small and quite thin - ...


8

Microscope works fine for this. The two problems you note aren't actually problems Microscope itself brings to the table: Microscope focuses on historical events and questions. This is the usual focus of Microscope, but it's an effect of the type of history the group has chosen, not the game itself. Choosing the history of a group of people will result in ...


8

Fate Core, and other Fate-based systems, seem to do exactly what you're asking for. Since you're asking specifically about character backgrounds, I'll skip the part about collaborative game-world creation, which is also present in these games, and skip straight to the characters. Chapter 3: Character Creation (FC30) opens with the header "Character Creation ...


8

Your instincts of "the man who knew too little" are spot on. Conspire with your players against/with your PCs. Narrate, the deep rich tapestry of the plot and character interactions to shape how your players will ... maneuver their dunces with the expectation that the results of their actions will be much better than a naive reading would produce. By making ...


7

Caravans only exist because going alone is dangerous. Due to the pressures of economics and danger, every person in a caravan is a liability, because they require carrying food, water, and personal effects that take up valuable room that could otherwise be filled with trade goods. Anyone who is an unnecessary liability is a threat to the success (i.e., ...


7

In fantasy games related to D&D the currency usually follows the 10 cp = 1sp, 10sp = 1gp pattern. I don't know about D&D, but Rolemaster explicitly stated that these are basically convenient conversion values -- and the 1:10 conversion is usually oversimplifying things as well... Personally, I came up with (gold) doubloons worth 100gp. The ...


7

Player knowledge is based on the fact that once you put the book for Cthulu on the table, people will expect this adventure to be about Cthulu. Surprise them. Play adventures that on the outside seem to be mysterious but turn out to be normal life. Play adventures that look like normal life but have horror right where they don't expect it. Now, to do ...


7

In my experience, by the time a person takes the plunge and actually runs a campaign, they want to write their own stuff. The problem is that writing your own stuff is tough, and knowing what to focus on, and what your players want to focus on, and getting the pacing right, is impossible without running a few games. Solution: The DM runs a smaller pre-made ...



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