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I think the primary issue is that you need the players to be doing something before the zombies come into it. That is, you almost have to pick a different genre of RPG and have a session that's interesting enough to be worth playing even before the zombies show up, and then the game will shift as the outbreak progresses. You need a distinct setting, and ...


0

Long time D&D player and DM who has tried and suffered under all the tropes in @Bankuei's answer. I recently found the game Technoir which has a lot of cool stuff that I am going to port into my D&D campaign. The thing that is exceptionally good for your particular problem is part of the character creation mechanism in Technoir, see the Player's ...


0

In my current game, I went with the cliche "a group of strangers will work together as a team in life and death situations", but I added a couple of touches to it to make it a bit more likely. First, I gave each character a fairly in-depth backstory to explain how they all ended up in the same spot at the same time. You can try to get the players to write ...


2

I think you need to ask yourself some more questions (in addition to what other good answers say): Is it important for your story for the characters to know/not know each other? Are motivations for adventuring and backstories important for the players or your story? What’s the beginning of the story? I think the more you need PC backgrounds and ...


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Lately I mostly play one-off games at conventions and such. In that context, characters who don't know each other at the beginning are pretty common. I think what's more important is that you have players who are willing to cooperate with each other. I have a friend who I don't game with anymore, because he obstructs the story and annoys everyone else under ...


21

There's no definite one way to go, though I prefer to have characters know each other. Here's some options and what you get of it: Total Strangers How well does this work? Well that depends on whether your players are all willing to buy into "a group of strangers will work together as a team in life and death situations". It's a trope that makes up a ...


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It’s purely up to you and your players; there is no “should” here. Many campaigns start with a “session 0” where people discuss their characters, and whether or not any of them know any of the others. Typically DMs merely set a time and place, and tell players “make sure your character has a good reason to be here when the story starts,” or something along ...



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