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1

Don't assume you know which campaigns will go long Assume that most campaigns will be fairly short, and you'll only ever run one or two which are a massive 1st-level to max-level epic. Plan accordingly. For a short campaign, what will make it awesome? Probably that's playing with mid-level characters, enough to experience some of the epic things you have ...


-3

Declare them insane- everytime somebody does nonsense - you declare everything so far a halucination in a asylum and reset them. The others hallicinated that too.


4

OP said, "This is causing problems, because usually I depend on knowledge checks to determine what they know about pretty much everything plot relevant - organizations, enemies, magic items, legendary monsters, etc." So...maybe don't do that? Given the usual tropes that gaming isn't a competition 'tween DM and PCs you can just tell them things instead of ...


1

My feeling is that the GM should not be giving away information or finding other ways to let the characters learn things. The players made the choice; now they have to live with the consequences. If no-one in the party has any smarts whatsoever, then there will be things they will just fail at. As the GM, I wouldn't fudge it so they succeed - I would have ...


4

To help you shape your campaign: Don't create scenarios that depend on Int checks to solve. Instead, focus on the stats they do have, like Wisdom. A character may not be smart enough to figure out a clever solution to a problem, but it doesn't mean they haven't seen a similar solution used and know how to apply it. After all, a character with high Int and ...


2

Let me come at this from another angle: that of a player. One of my (and everyone else's!) favourite characters was Bob the Rat Slayer. Bob had INT 3; he was a "special" child, raised by back-woods monks in a remote hermitage. He was tasked with killing the mice in the basement wine cellar at an early age, and as he grew older (and BIGGER...Bob had STR 18, ...


15

Erik's answer is a great general solution to your problem, but there are a couple of specific tactics you can use here as well. Put Your Eggs in More Baskets Right now, you're relying on a single skill or small group of skills in order to give your players information about the game world. This is naturally going to lead to situations where nobody has the ...


-7

Give experience point bonuses for players who do a good job of playing an authentically dumb character. Establish a base experience point bonus value (25 xp, for example) Every time a player can get you to laugh by way of role-playing, give them an experience point bonus.


57

For your players Use other solutions Intelligence is only one of 3 mental stats, and the one that refers mostly to book-learning, puzzling, connection-making and thinking stuff through. However, lacking it doesn't make you a bumbling fool; it makes you someone who solves problems in other ways. For example, if it's crucial that the characters know who ...


8

Your instincts of "the man who knew too little" are spot on. Conspire with your players against/with your PCs. Narrate, the deep rich tapestry of the plot and character interactions to shape how your players will ... maneuver their dunces with the expectation that the results of their actions will be much better than a naive reading would produce. By making ...


18

Arcanist, Sorcerer, and Wizard are three of the most dominatingly-powerful classes in the game Each of these classes, built right, can do just about anything, and in many cases can do very close to everything. The spell list they have access to is the best in the game, and spellcasting is the best class feature in the game. These three can nullify a huge ...



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