Hot answers tagged

58

For your players Use other solutions Intelligence is only one of 3 mental stats, and the one that refers mostly to book-learning, puzzling, connection-making and thinking stuff through. However, lacking it doesn't make you a bumbling fool; it makes you someone who solves problems in other ways. For example, if it's crucial that the characters know who ...


51

0. Do your players want this, too? If you haven't discussed a different playstyle I think they're reasonable to still expect the "sporty" style you were previously playing. That's why I think--even one session in--a change like this would be equivalent to starting a new campaign: same setting and same characters, but different game. If you have not had ...


40

Let the Baby Bird Leave the Nest Having rotated a campaign through many GM hands, the least disruptive thing we found was to not worry about it. Your turn at the helm is over. Our group has multiple people that like to GM. We created a world we really liked and want to continue exploring when it is someone else's turn to run a campaign. We decided that ...


26

Recently in my campaign the party wanted to wipe out a large, established, group of gnolls which took us int combat-as-war. How I handled it was: Step 1: Discuss Combat-As-War with the party When the party was beginning to plan their attack I had an out of character conversation with them about the differences between combat as sport and combat as war. I ...


21

Talk to your GM in private First step first. Call him in private, and give him feedback. Try to not be vague, actually point out what you didn't like, with examples that happened in game. If possible, also give a hint of what you were expecting, by saying how you would handle this if you were the GM on that situation. Don't be afraid about "losing a ...


20

Have everyone make notes, and keep a copy of everyone's. Likewise, take a photocopy of everyone's character sheets. Put them all in a folder. Keep that folder safe. In the process of reopening, have everyone read their notes, and share some stories of past character deeds. If you have time before hiatus, wrap up or tie off a bunch of loose ends, but not ...


19

Erik's answer is a great general solution to your problem, but there are a couple of specific tactics you can use here as well. Put Your Eggs in More Baskets Right now, you're relying on a single skill or small group of skills in order to give your players information about the game world. This is naturally going to lead to situations where nobody has the ...


18

Absolutely. Apocalypse World (AW) is tonnes of fun to play for a single session, but it was actually designed for long-term play. The full possibilities of the character-development mechanics require several sessions to unfold. There are three common lengths of Apocalypse World games. Single session. These are fun, as already mentioned. This is a good way ...


17

Does it have to be D&D? My go-to game for introducing anyone to roleplaying is Fiasco, a game in which you create and play out a Coen Brothers-esque scenario. You’ll play ordinary people with powerful ambition and poor impulse control. There will be big dreams and flawed execution. It won’t go well for them, to put it mildly, and in the end it will ...


17

Finally, I had also thought about some kind of virus which would make robots turn against humans, in a society were security bots are the norm. I find that the best plots are engendered by taking elements of current events, exaggerating the causal themes, and inserting a unique twist, then time adjusting it and inserting it into your baseline campaign to ...


17

There are several things you can try to improve your experience with this game. That said, they all come with one big caveat: Do not approach this by telling your GM that he's "doing it wrong". There are a lot of different styles of GMing and playing, and even if the GM is using one that you personally don't like, that doesn't mean it's wrong or objectively ...


16

If possible (you haven't left off the game on a very intense cliffhanger), move forward the campaign world by one month for every week that passes IRL. Write updates on what happens in the world, ask the players to sum up their characters' reactions to the events. Example: "With the coming of spring the King falls quite ill, which gives rise to talk about ...


16

Your level is about how much experience you have so far. It says nothing about where you are in the story. Consider the Lord of the Rings. At the beginning of the adventure, Frodo is a beginner, level 1, just starting his career. Aragorn, however, has been in many stories so far (even if we don't see them ourselves). When he joins this adventure, the ...


16

A "Living" campaign is one of the old RPGA-run organized play campaigns designed for you to use and advance a character across multiple play opportunities at public events like RPG conventions and game days, in the same shared world and using officially sanctioned adventures. (For you kids nowadays, the RPGA was a RPG fan organization sponsored by TSR, ...


13

I think it depends on whether your family members have the interest and attention span required. Neither of my parents would play an RPG, but my brother would. I think there are several important factors for this - especially if you don't want to ruin your holidays! It's got to be a fast game. You have to have a short, simple scenario ready to go. You ...


13

This might be a good time to flesh out your setting and characters by collaboratively typing up a mess of details online. You can set up a wiki, share some Google Docs, or just start a big email chain. Then, ask each other questions. You can ask your players questions about their characters' goals and histories, and they can ask you for details about the ...


11

The Dying Earth RPG, set in Jack Vance's Dying Earth. Dark Sun, for D&D, where the world has been dried up by destructive use of magic. Ravenloft, also for D&D, which is a dystopia, being the private hell chunks for 20+ über-evil individuals. Several published settings for EABA. Greg's got a pretty dark streak showing.


11

It appears from your example that you've been playing the adventure with a group of 3 characters, without tuning down the encounters. If you do so, faster leveling is expected. Rationale D&D 4e's adventures use encounters that have been balanced against a party of 5, which is the expected number of players. If you have a party of 6 or a party of 4 (or, ...


11

"Living campaign" is a common term for a "shared-universe" campaign played by an extended community of participants, usually mediated by an organization like the RPGA. The idea is that players from all over the world can participate in the evolution of a shared setting, either developing organically based on an aggregate of player actions or pre-determined ...


10

Really an important question here is how much you expect to get through per session. I ran a group of new players through the Sunless Citadel a couple years ago. Technically, it's just one adventure and only one dungeon. In practice, in the four sessions that the game lasted, they explored less than half of it. If your beginners are about as fast as mine ...


9

I almost invariably run sandbox games, what the players do is entirely up to them and the plot advances through NPCs no matter if they interact or not! Before organising a big sandbox campaign where there are strategic targets I'd advise the following: Talk to the players; see what they want from the game and enjoy. Do they like exploring? Fights? ...


9

I wouldn't call it a campaign, but I'm a fan of Gorgoldand's Gauntlet as a low-level adventure. It was a published Dungeon adventure from May 2001 (this obviously makes it 3.0 and not 3.5, but I don't expect it would be difficult to update). A quick search turned up this PDF version: https://web.archive.org/web/20120127074715/http://gilda.it/imperium/...


8

There's lots of good answers here. I particularly like the first one of using stories from the news as inspiration. Here's some ideas that are still relevant, but perhaps were more obviously cutting edge 8 years ago: widespread use of drones, widespread use of mercenaries by both governments and corporations, and the use of child soldiers. For something more ...


8

Your instincts of "the man who knew too little" are spot on. Conspire with your players against/with your PCs. Narrate, the deep rich tapestry of the plot and character interactions to shape how your players will ... maneuver their dunces with the expectation that the results of their actions will be much better than a naive reading would produce. By making ...


7

First make sure you write down where you are ... the last thing you want is to go to restart the campaign, and realize that have no clue where you left off. Depending on where you are currently at in your campaign, you may want to wrap things up over email, to bring the "open chapter" in the campaign to a close. This would allow you to be more flexible when ...


7

I normally follow this process: Check with the existing group Get everyone to meet somewhere neutral (coffee shop/pub) for lunch/dinner Check again with the existing group Sleep on it I think it is important for everyone to have a say because the game does not belong to the GM but the whole group.


7

Cyberpunk is about a fast world overwhelming and crushing people. Pick a technological or social advance that occurs too fast and destroys the lives of a lot of people while catapulting a few others beyond humanity. Ideas: A new affordable and safe source of energy (practical fusion power at last, maybe) threatens to upset the balance of power(=oligopoly) ...


7

This question really heavily depends on your groups style of play, frequency of moves and duration and frequency of sessions. Frequency of sessions: the more often you play and the shorter your sessions are, the more often you will use the End of Session move and thus earn XP at a faster rate. Frequency of moves: the more often a move involving a roll is ...


6

Consider a Hybrid: D&D Boardgames There are boardgame versions of D&D - everything is self contained in the box: Map tiles, minis, vastly simplified 4e-derived rules, power/item cards, pregenerated characters and scenarios. The monsters are tightly scripted and controlled by the players, so there is no DM - everyone gets to play a character. Castle ...


6

WHile not having actually played BoL... I've played many an equally simple game engine. I've seen reports of campaign play. I've read BoL. BoL has character advancement options, and sufficient flexibility, to be able to sustain a 10-20 session campaign. Assuming each session is a story¹, that's 2-3 Advancement points per session. (p. 40) Which means 20-...



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