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25

Good News! There's actually a template for that in the official rules - see here. That link contains all the information on creating a lycanthrope template for any were-thingy you can think of :) The specific details for a were-rex follow. rule quotes are shown like this specific details will appear below them like this. Creating a Lycanthrope ...


22

The general rule is that you can only take each feat once Page 165 Player's Handbook. You can take each feat only once, unless the feat's description says otherwise. The Magic Initiate feat does not list an exception to that rule which means you can only take it once. Except that the Magic Initiate feat encapsulates a choice of options. You have to ...


18

No, the ability score improvements are from gaining the specific levels in a class, as listed in each class's table. See page 71 for the Fighter's advancement table and page 83 for the Paladin's advancement table. To be precise, these are what you would get if you went Paladin 3/Fighter 1 now, reading right off those tables: Paladin 1: Divine Sense, ...


16

in one word - information. You can wish for (or perhaps simply learn) more about the past place/time you are travelling to: contacts, important information about future events, some soon-to-be invented tech... Knowing who will win a race is a good quick money; knowing some juicy gossip is a way to make friends, or blackmail someone; knowing who will be the ...


15

Generally speaking, if you receive the same feature twice (whether it's because you invested a Feat and then picked a class granting the same thing, or simply because you have two classes that grant you the same proficiency) it simply means that one of the two copies is wasted. However, Pathfinder features a set of Retraining Rules that allow you to retrain ...


13

I've tried to modify my games to use a non-standard leveling system. Basically, it amounted to each character gaining an npc-class level halfway through leveling up, giving them appropriate skills, BaB, and hit dice, but denying them class features until they level up fully, including feats. While it was interesting, it came with three primary flaws. I ...


13

Restating my assumptions: You need to send your spirit back in time to possess your earlier self to avoid execution. You have two sidereal weeks to prepare for this. You have no consequences in the present for your actions. You are in a very large city with access to real spellcasters. This is the climax of your game, barring that: "Our goal is to alter ...


13

The advancement system you use is irrelevant, and in fact you can do away with any formal advancement system at all and just level up when you feel the time is right. There are a few other important things though that should be regarded when you are doing this. 4e's baseline math assumption is that you're going to spend about 10 encounters on a given level. ...


11

I strongly agree with the previous offers, information could be invaluable, as a mean of regaining gold quickly but also as an edge to complete your mission. Yet if as me you are more concerned by the numbers and crunches , I would like to extend on another alternative to the grafts... Tomes. It won't get you really far but you could probably locate one +2 ...


9

In DnD 4e, characters tend to level every 8-10 or so encounters. Depending on the exact Encounter Level of each fight (or noncombat encounter (eg Trap). Faster if the encounters are above their Character level, slower if below, Also faster if they are getting XP for completing a story/dungeon/quest, and if you have any house rules like XP for good ...


9

As @Drunken_Guy already pointed out, the table you are looking for is on page 22 of the Player Handbook, however I usually found more useful to simply apply the formula: exp for level X = X * (X - 1) * 500 For example, if you need to now the exp needed for level 3 then exp = 3 * 2 * 500 = 3000 or another example, for level 9 exp = 9 * 8 * 500 = 36000 ...


9

The info you require are on the first pages of the Player's Handbook. In 3.5 (and I think in other editions as well), info is seperated in the books by the person they refer to. For example the experience points required to level up, is information that the players need and not the DM, that is why it is referenced in the Player's Handbook. This info is not ...


8

Odd scores are worthless to you, since you’re primarily interested in your modifier (which halves the number and drops the fraction), and just about all bonuses to ability scores come in even numbers. So you’ll get the most immediate bang for your buck by upping the odd scores to the next (even) number. So +1 Cha, +1 Con, +1 Str, +1 Wis, probably ...


8

You would not. An Ability Score Improvement, or ASI, is gained through the class itself. It's an exclusively earned feature for each individual class as shown by their class tables. This is also why each class has a description of the ASI feature. So for this scenario of being Paladin 3 and then taking 1 level in Fighter, you only gain what is mentioned in ...


7

You are correct Lots - mainly trying to somewhat reconcile both power utility and rate of gain across classes Though 3e classes do diverge in power (see What are "tiers", and what tier is each class?), the goal was for them not to - this flows into the "unlimited multiclassing" 3e provided as well, where you could take a level of any class and ...


7

You use the best progression from your two classes. Player's Handbook, "Multi-CLass Benefits and Restrictions", page 44, last paragraph before the multi-classing example: If the optional proficiency system is used, the character […] gains new proficiency slots at the fastest of the given rates. which is reiterated on page 52, end of the first ...


5

Rules mods and diversification I ran a very long Rolemaster high-level campaign, characters started at level 10 and some reached the mid 20s, technically it's still going, so I understand the perils of powerful casters! I've also run several low level MERP/RM games as well. I made a lot of rules changes, mostly from the excellent Rolemaster Companion 2 ...


5

So, not to sound obvious, but multiclassing as a Druid will increase your versatility the most. The Druid is a full caster with a nice variety of offensive, defensive, and utility spells. As well as the healing you mention. 1 level of Druid would give you 2 cantrips and access to all 1st level Druid spells. 2 would give you Wild Shape, after that it's pretty ...


4

After asking this question I looked at the math and playtested a couple of different modifications. I have found that increasing the amount of xp required to buy a skill is a very effective way to reduce the rate of skill acquisition. Rather than the default cost of 1 xp to change a die to a six for advancement, I adjusted the cost to 10 xp. So far this ...


4

This is actually fairly common. Weird events often occur during an adventurer's adventures, and sometimes an adventurer gains permanent powers from those weird events. In other words, Yes, There's Precedent In Advanced Dungeons and Dragons DMs were sort of expected to run adventures that changed characters--usually for ill. The Dungeon Master's Guide ...


4

I think it would make more sense from an in-game point of view if he became a little bit stronger one day, learned something new the next day, became more resilient the day after that, etc., instead of all this occurring at once. From an in-game point of view, that is exactly what does happen. The game-mechanics numbers all improving at once are an ...


4

Racial Levels Frank and K's Tome of Tiamat was to include something appropriate for your needs, but it was never finished. However, you can take some inspiration from their forums, which offer a paradigm similar to the Savage Progressions offered by Sean K Reynolds. There is also the article/forum post "Improved monster classes: adapting creatures for ...


4

It's all the same. The experience point cost to gain a level is always based on your total character level, as shown in the Character Advancement table in chapter 1, not your level in a particular class. (PHB, p. 163, "Multiclassing: Experience Points") The amount of XP you need to go from Fighter 3 to Fighter 4 is the same amount of XP you need to go ...


3

Try Savage Progressions This is pretty much precisely the use case of the Savage Progressions articles. They still have some of the problems of templates (particularly at high levels), but they allow players to slowly add abilities as they level up. You don't have to worry about a giant 9 LA jump. Otherwise, see below... Doing away with the racial hit ...


3

Magic users at low levels Do you use the optional rule that allows a skill (spell mastery?) to modify spell effects? Dropping some of your hobby skill points and a couple of levels can get you quite good at level 1. Then you can modify spells to do interesting things: For example, summon a snake (level 1 spell) on some unsuspecting foe! Bonus points if said ...


3

Difficulty of the encounters (by how much XP each encounter is worth) determines how fast your PCs level Simply put, Take the total XP of an encounter, divide it by the number of PCs, and you are left with the amount of XP each party member will receive for defeating all the monsters in an encounter. If you are planning a straight-up murderfest then thats ...


2

Like Dragonsdoom, I found increasing the xp needed to level up helped. But instead of just a flat increase, I changed it to cost 1xp per point increase on the dice. Players would wait until they got close to all sixes before spending the xp since upgrading a die from 1 to six costs (1+2+3+4+5) 15 points but upgrading a 5 to a 6 only costs 5xp. The cost ...


2

Warning, I would not let the player control the dino post transformation. That is just asking for balance problems. Use the following curse: Werewolf Lycanthropy Type: curse, injury; Save Fortitude DC 15 negates, Will DC 15 to avoid effects Onset the next full moon; Frequency on the night of every full moon or whenever the target is ...


2

Haven't played regularly in 15 years, so my recollection of the rules may be rusty. As I remember it, there were some ambiguities in spellcasting. When we played, we interpreted those ambiguities to either aid or hinder casters, depending on how the GM wanted the game to run. We treated them as options to tweak between campaigns. As I recall... The ...


2

For this I would get a taste of each, then go get an ability score increase. So lets say you decide Rogue is the best class to start with (I don't have my books with me right now, I can't say which is better). I would start with a level of Rogue, and then take a level of Monk at L2. This will suffer a bit since the rogue really gets going at L2, but I think ...



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