New answers tagged

1

There are no options in any of the core D&D 5e books which allow "retraining" a class using any definition of "retraining" that I can think of. The only options for training of any sort I see at all are: The PHB offers rules for multiclassing (p163) but this isn't so much "retraining" as it is training in a different field entirely. The PHB (p187) ...


3

This depends a lot on the context. There's two I can think of off the top of my head. In the core rules and SRD, no, there's no way to undo training, so choose carefully. Once you've made a class selection, you're keeping it unless there's some serious voodoo involved (or you're a druid/cleric/paladin and lose your powers by offending your ...


2

Honestly, no, there are not. There are a number of magical locations one can visit for permanent or at least long-lasting benefits, and various groups you can join that give you bonuses for affiliation, but these things do not provide these kinds of bonuses, tend to cost money someone with Vow of Poverty cannot have, or else “count as” wealth which ...


8

Yes, it stacks Let's review the stacking rules. In most cases, modifiers to a given check or roll stack (combine for a cumulative effect) if they come from different sources and have different types (or no type at all), but do not stack if they have the same type or come from the same source (such as the same spell cast twice in succession) Are two ...


2

No, this build is quite weak Assuming the standard ability scores, on level 8 all the non-multiclass party members can have a 20, this build will have only 16. With weapon attacks this means a 20-40 percent lag on DPR per attack, and half the number of attacks reasonably expected on that level from a weapon user. If it tries to use spells the difference is ...


0

Balanced builds aren't always the way to go in D&D (IMHO). D&D is a team sport and the weaknesses of one PC are made up for my the strengths of another PC. That said, I generally don't allow multi-classing unless the player can give me a valid role-playing reason. For instance, why would a ranger decide to pursue theology? Why would he (the ...


1

The short answer is "No". For a start, Improved Critical is a waste of a feat, unless your DM has house-ruled that it stacks with Keen. Yes, you might get a few extra crits with your shield and save some gold, but generally the rapier is the only place the added threat range will make a significant difference, and that feat could go to a number of other ...



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