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-2

I suppose one must first as, Why must one min-max the character? If your looking at points on a sheet, then I wonder if any Storyteller system will work. IE: The points on the sheet, should reflect the person. It actually takes more work to go from the Master's to a PhD than it does to go from Bachelor's to Master's, or HSD to Bachelors.. In that I feel ...


1

Yes Fix: Eliminate Bonus points or Undo the growing cost increase on attributes, skills, disciplines, etc. or Add the growing cost to Bonus Point pricing. The Problem Baring that, any time where character creation resources have a different math then leveling resources, there will be an 'optimal solution path' in which a character built using that path ...


8

Short answer The rules are not completely clear on this one, but in the absence of an exception, I would say that your Alchemist does get additional formulae if his intelligence increases permanently, and the first James Jacobs' quote you cite would seem to support this. This is no less 'illogical' than the fact alchemists get new formulae when they go up a ...


-1

No, your "starting spells" are one of very few things that aren't retroactively raised when their setting stat goes up. They're a measure of how much stuff you managed to figure out before you started adventuring, and so only your pre-career Intelligence matters. Everything else that isn't explicitly called out as not changing do; skill ranks, bonus ...


4

I've always assumed it was to prevent excessive optimization, as Rubberduck has pointed out. I'd just like to add an additional example, based on your character's defenses. Each of your non-AC defenses (NADs) is determined by the higher of two ability scores: strength or constitution for fortitude, dexterity or intelligence for reflex, and wisdom or ...


13

It is mostly to avoid min-maxing. Say you have a build where you only care about two ability scores, considering the rest to be dump stats. With only one ability score allowed at 8, you can reach the following array: Str 17 (+2) 12 points Dex 16 (+3) 9 points Con 11 (+0) 1 point Int 10 (+0) Wis 10 (+0) Cha 8 (-1) With all ability scores allowed ...


5

Scratched, breathless, his tabard torn, the scout entered the tent. "Sire! It's too late!" he gasped. "Sir Bailus appraoches!" The king pulled his eyes away from the map spread before him, intricate 2"-high wooden figures locating upon it opposing armies of knights, wizards, and fantastic creatures. The king shook his head in despair, reached into the ...


2

A couple more extreme solutions explaining how the players come together: Escape from an impregnable fortress scenario. The characters are prisoners languishing in the dungeon of a powerful sorcerer's vast mountain fortress in the polar wastes. Perhaps they were all members of separate adventuring bands of varying alignment who were captured and thrown ...


2

Your players are telling you quite clearly what game they want to play: they want to play an implausible mixed bag of race and character types that make no sense together, but that they think are fun. Apparently they don't want to take the edges off this by changing their individual concepts, or by doing a lot of work to make their mixed bag plausible, or by ...


3

What you'll need To start, be a Lunar with an animal form that can be ridden and can fly. (A pegasus or roc, perhaps.) Take the Allies background with a high enough rating to have your Solar mate hanging around; they're going to do all the real work. Your Solar needs to be of at least essence 4. (Twilight caste probably, though any caste can do it.) They ...


0

I have a character that does something like this. Hengeyokai Thief, goes around with a frost hand crossbow, a Spellsoul blade rapier, and a couple daggers. Two Fisted Shooter lets you use the crossbow efficiently. Use the frost cheese combo for CA, and several items give you bonuses with cold damage. The Thief gives you a TON of skills, and with the right ...


8

There is no guideline for this. D&D doesn't contain the idea of spending years in training to improve, and lacking any such training rules there's no way to guesstimate the power of a character based on their years of experience in a given role. You really don't need a guideline for this, anyway. D&D hands the DM the job of determining non-player ...


-8

If I may, group cohesion and common cause are only necessary in certain types of campaigns, campaigns which you need to tell your players about before you start playing. For instance: "Oh hey, the universe is dying, Cthulhu is riding a comet towards the earth, cults are burning everything to pieces, you're four characters working together because if you ...


24

There is only one thing scarier than a farmer with her flock of chickens... a sainted farmer, worshiper of the colonel with a flock of undead, flesh-eating chickens, here to sell you delicious chicken flesh. This idead inspired from this thread where: ... you are going to be playing a very different character than the cleric of a death god who has to ...


-4

Alright this is going to be fun. I recommend that rather then focusing on throwing a few chicken per turn, you move to acquire as many buffs that effect all allies within a given radius of you as possible. I don't care how many classes, magic items, or feats it takes. What you want is so that every chicken within close if not medium range of you is a CR 2 ...


1

That is a tricky one, in the groups I've played in the GM has told us before the start of the campaign that 'This is a campaign on the high seas', so we know to look at the swashbuckler class, or roll a race that does well with water. Or another example 'this will be an evil campaign', so we know to roll an evil character and in this way there's some group ...


5

There is a dangerous misconception here among this group, and you may want to address it now before participating in any future games with them. It is not the sole responsibility of the GM to keep the game going This is an early roleplaying misconception, and one very easy to fall into. It is true that the GM has a special role in the game that they ...


3

Everyone runs their games differently, and people are very different. With that in mind, When I am DMing, I usually have a starting place or what the movies would call a 'meet-cute' in mind. Something that at least has the characters run into each other with a common goal. Based on your example, it might have to be something extreme, like everybody waking up ...


6

This is common for players to not put much effort into how they formed a party. Generally its "we meet at a tavern". Players form a character then some time in the game do the party formation story. The players aren't lazy unless they won't do their own roleplay their inter-party dynamics. The problem is the character concepts have so much in conflict. Its ...


7

There are already a lot of answers aiming at the human problem and I think this is the way to go. However, assuming those people are friends or that simply dropping the game is not an easy solution, I'll try to tackle the problem from the other side and figure out a generic way to make such a group work. If your party can't work in the standart setting, ...


-7

That sounds like a pack of munchkins. Warn them if that if they don't want to take the RP part of RPG seriously, then that's the game they get -- brutal, nasty and short. My suggestion is that you play it somewhat like Paranoia, that great old game where you should be done in a few hours, everyone gets six clones because the DM will try to kill them off ...


5

Other answers are correct that you left out telling them what kind of characters they needed to choose. "Anything from D&D" is way too broad, and will cause this problem. Now they have characters they like, which won't be compatible without creativity, cooperation, and/or several of them dying off or going their own way. That said, here's an idea for ...


10

There are two important social aspects of GMing (or really any form of managing people). One is setting expectations, the other is understanding what is expected of you. The first role in this situation appears to have been fumbled a bit. The PC's were to have been given the freedom to make whatever characters they wanted, without any guidelines or ...


61

"Fine, then we just won't play." "OK." Call their bluff, whether you think it's a bluff or not. If they're bluffing, they do want to play and will buckle down and figure it out if they have to. If they're not bluffing, they don't really want to play anyway and you've dodged a bullet. (GMing for a group that doesn't really want to play is a ...


5

Option 1: Be Honest: Tell them that 1: it's not the DM's job to come up with how the party meets, and 2: their party is so stretched to ridiculous levels that they need to have a legitimate excuse. Option 2: Give them a reason to be together: Now, I don't want to say let them be right, but You can give them some recommendations or tell them why there are ...


12

There are already some great answers here, but I wanted to touch on something that has not yet been addressed. The 'it's all the GM's responsibility' attitude that you are encountering is not that uncommon, and can cause a real problem as it tends to significantly increase the amount of work you have to do. For the sake of argument, lets say that you decide ...


32

If you don't give your players guidelines, then they will do whatever. That said, you did give a guideline ("At least give a me a reason, any reason, you know each other"), a pretty low, low bar to meet, and the players aren't interested in meeting it. Your options are: Play the gonzo game with no expectations I'm not a huge fan of this, just because ...


21

What am I supposed to do exactly whenever players want to all be something so different? The way I solve this problem is by not having it... Yeah, kinda circular but bear with me. First, all my game start with a set of requirements. Some are non-optionals, some are. Always, the first non-optional one is related to how I want the game to start. For ...


95

Don't run the campaign It is often important (but not always) for the party to have a preexisting, long term reason to stay a party. It is especially important in situations like this, with non-standard parties. Unless that reason is part of your pitch, it is incumbent upon the players to come up with that reason. Your Options Make it a One-Shot So you ...


7

Ability score adjustments due to a change in size category occur only when the creature changes size When a creature increases or decreases its current size category via magic or advancing Hit Dice or another method, that is when the modifiers to the creature's statistics from the Creature Size table apply, unless the method's description says otherwise or ...


1

Minotaurs A raging bull. A raging man. A raging bull-man. Minotaurs are thematically great barbarians. If you want to go more with the Greek myth, they're cursed creatures, and that's a good reason for raging, if nothing else. Why not "just" Orcs? Forget half-orcs - just go with orcs. They're big, they're strong. They're basically depicted AS ...


-1

From what I can tell there are no Lizardfolk or Lizardmen playable races in 4th edition. There's a gap between the big and muscled Dragonborn and the stealthy swamp-dwelling Bullywug, who are frog people. If you want Lizardfolk you should either reskin an existing race, find a homebrew or come up with somehting yourself.


14

Reskin Razorclaw Shifter to be Lizardfolk First and foremost reskins/refluffs of existing classes/races/etc. work really well in 4e because everything works off of mechanical keywords. Thus you are free to rename and redescribe a mechanical something as a very different story something without affecting the game in any real way. Razorclaw Shifters stand ...


2

I found these. As far as I know, there's no official Lizardfolk stuff for 4e though. http://www.dandwiki.com/wiki/Lizardfolk_%284e_Race%29 https://moebius.wordpress.com/2008/06/05/lizardfolk-dd-40/


3

All races are equally good from a narrative standpoint, depending on your narrative. PCs from traditional barbarian cultures (e.g. full blooded orcs, Wild elves) might be narratively preferable in a game that allows them to contrast the merits and weaknesses of their strictly deontological ethics with the rampant pragmatic utilitarianism of the City. PCs ...


7

No, you don't need to, but some races are better at the job. This is usually a matter of having bonuses to the right ability scores, or having racial powers or feats that synergize with the class. I think that's true of every D&D edition past 2e (where only humans could be paladins), at least for base classes (prestige classes, just like paragon paths ...


15

NO! All racial limits are turned off in 4e for classes. There are no restrictions for who or what you can be based on race. There are some slight limits based on alignment, but those don't mean much and have little mechanical impact so they can safely be ignored.


4

Passive [any skill] is the same as when Taking 10. So that's 10 + your base skill bonus. This is covered in the Player's Handbook in chapter 5: "Skills", in the "Checks without Rolls" section on page 179.


0

Apology Now that the character that originally prompted the question has actually reached level 7, and that I've had about 9 months of DM experience, I've revisited this question to see what we came up with. I think that the answer I originally gave is pretty decent, it has some upvotes, and I don't want to remove it, but I don't think that it's what I'm ...



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