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2

In addition to the basic training requirements listed in Dogs of War, a pilot will require at a minimum: Drive and appropriate speciality; enough Academics for a bachelor's degree (at least. Higher ranking officers will require Expression and additional Academics to represent War College), and at least some survival and intimidation (resist intimidation) to ...


3

You can find this in "Dogs of War." Here's what you need to make it through Basic Training (page 16): A character must have at least 2 in every Attribute except Manipulation, which can be 1; a minimum Willpower of 5, a minimum Morality of 6 and no derangements. All of the other requirements above fall under a character’s history and Flaws. Basic ...


2

The following is from an article by Justin Alexander, found here. I won't re-post the entire thing, but this excerpt is the core of the article's thoughts. The main article goes on to refer to examples in media where the hero and villain dynamic is developed well (or not) and why, as well as giving some game table examples. It's part of the "Don't Prep ...


4

My best villains are based off the what the players care about. I'll talk about methods and some recent (in the last 3-4 years) examples. You may want to check out my 7 Types of Antagonists as well. What the players care about - Flags So first off, I tend to play games with explicit mechanics for the players to tell me what kinds of conflicts they're ...


0

In addition to the above answers specifying starting equipment a class received, you can choose the starting gold option instead and build your own equipment list. This is an alternative and not in addition to what you get for your class. The starting gold table is found in the equipment section, and I will update the page number later when I get home. The ...


8

If you become trained in a skill, it exactly cancels out any inability in that same skill. This is effectively the long-term gain you call out - though you should note that becomming trained in this way counts as one of the four improvements you can take per tier.


1

In addition to the more “straight” examples offered by d7, many varieties of “true” dragon in D&D can take on the form of humanoids (as well as other animals). For example, in the 3.5 edition (which is relatively easy to reference thanks to the SRD), the bronze, gold, and silver are core dragons that are capable of it. The steel ...


7

Yes, it's possible. The idea of inverting a were-creature into a "creature-were" isn't new and has been done in various editions of D&D. There are various monsters and "PC" races (and because this is a game of imagination, new ones can — and are, often created): hengeyokai, jackalweres (not werejackals!), wolfweres, kitsune, and many others ...


10

Fighter, Monk, Wizard, Sorcerer, Cleric, Shugenja (from Complete Divine), Rogue and Ninja (from Complete Adventurer) Unfortunately, you have selected a massively disparate subset of the classes. Fighter, monk, ninja, and rogue are four of the weakest classes published for all of 3.5 (with Complete Adventurer’s ninja actually probably the worst ...


1

Tome of Battle: Book of Nine Swords The Warblade and Swordsage classes are effectively the 'more options' versions of the Fighter and the Monk. They are slightly stronger than the fighter and the monk, but not as strong as a full caster. BWL's Art of War Fighter This is the best 'Fighter Fix' I found floating around on the web. Notably, it gives ...


0

For example, I play a Barbarian in another 3.5e game, and we've incorporated the Pathfinder rules for Rage powers and Rage rounds per day. It seems that the Pathfinder Fighter isn't any better than the 3.5e Fighter, however. The "simple" answer is to just extend what you're already doing with the Barbarian and use the Pathfinder versions of those ...


1

You have a couple things you can do here in terms of resources without tossing out all your classes and becoming an obsessive optimizer. Tome of Battle - The Book of Nine Swords Tome of Battle is a late 3.5e WotC book which offers a kung fu style "martial maneuvers" system that gives martial characters interesting and powerful things to do. Comes with new ...


-4

Additionally, if you meet the requirements there is the Lorekeeper Epic Destiny (PHB2 pg.173) which has: Lorekeeper’s Revelation (30th level): Choose two of your daily utility powers. Those two powers are now encounter powers for you. If you do not have two daily utility powers, you can immediately retrain your utility powers until you have two daily ...


6

There is a plethora of classes that either have an Animal Companion as a class feature by default, or can gain one via Archetypes. In particular, the Huntmaster Cavalier comes pretty close to your idea of a Paladin with a Hawk, albeit without the inherent holyness that a Paladin has. Alternatively, if you want to keep the clerical aspects of the Paladin, ...


2

Many, many classes have an archetype that grants an animal companion or other special access to them. However, failing that, any character of at least level 4 may gain access to an animal companion via the Animal Ally feat, though most characters may have to wait to level 5 (the next feat level in pathfinder) to actually take the feat. In the specific ...


1

The Advanced Class Guide's Hunter has class abilities that specifically pertain to improving your animal companion and having it fight alongside you as a friend and teammate. One notable Hunter archetype is the Packmaster, which grants your character the ability to have multiple animal companions. The Inquisitor archetype Sacred Huntsmaster grants your ...


-2

My suggestion is to take a look at "Lords of Gossamer & Shadow" by Rite Publishing, it uses the Systems of AmberDiceless but set in a new universe and cleans up some of the old stuff (though sadly not Sorcery). The core book gives a good idea of 'how' the auction system works and gives good insight into it. In Lords of Gossamer & Shadow there is ...


7

The standard equipment that a starting character gets is defined by both their class at 1st level and by their background. The class describes various options for equipment, such as the Rogue who chooses: a shortsword OR a rapier a shortbow and a quiver of 20 arrows OR a shortsword a burlgars pack, a dungeoneers pack, OR an explorers pack and ...


4

Each class has a standard set of starting equipment options detailed in the PHB. A Fighter, for example, starts with the equipment from his or her background, plus: (a) chain mail or (b) leather, longbow and 20 arrows (a) a martial weapon and a shield or (b) two martial weapons (a) a light crossbow and 20 bolts or (b) two handaxes (a) a ...


10

The chapter 5 of the players handbook titled "Equipment" features a "Starting Wealth by Class" table (PHB: 143) where you can look this up. Please note that this is an alternative to the equiment gained through class or background.


0

My preferred option is Hero Lab. It's easy to use, gives you plenty of options, and gets frequent updates to fix bugs or add more content. Despite not being free, I personally find that Hero Lab is worth it for SR5, just because there is so much material that it's hard to keep your math straight with other tools or methods. I find that form-fillable ...


0

As other posters mention, you add the racial hit die to the class level and the level adjustment to get effective character level (ECL), which doesn't confer anything. ECL just has the game effect of determining your xp awards and the experience points needed to advance, and is used when your DM determines average party level for encounter level and expected ...


10

There are a few reasons for a spellcaster to be in melee (most of which you mentioned.) I'll cover them one by one. One is auras that buff nearby allies. The Paladin wins this one. Honestly, no other class even comes close. However, outside that, the Paladin's primary focus is on buffing his own melee attacks with the [X]-ing Smite spells, which isn't ...



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