New answers tagged

0

The costs for Droid Locomotion are in Table 11-3 on p. 188. They reference Cost Factor, which is in Table 11-2 on the page before and varies by size. Per p. 189 Jump servos double the cost of a walking locomotion system. The rules make no distinction about when a property is applied, either as part of a new design or as a modification later, so ...


2

While a point-buy option is certainly a possibility in any RPG, Maid isn't one that lends itself well to it. The rules in general focus fairly heavily on randomization and character-impermanence. Chaos is meant to be part of the fun. Naturally, you can run a more "serious" game (relatively speaking), but keep in mind what the game is based around - anime ...


0

The price depends on what size your droid is. For instance: A medium droid would need to pay 20 Credits for a Claw. Where as a Colossal droid would have to pay 400 credits for the claw. (A Medium droid has a cost factor of X1, a Colossal droid has a cost factor of X20. The claws cost is 20X Cost factor. Medium: 20 x 1 =20, Colossal: 20 x 20 =400.) You find ...


1

Nothing in the text of Impervious states that it only applies to enhanced Toughness, and there are examples in the book of extras being applied to "natural" abilities such as strength damage, let alone to enhanced ones such as your "cyber skin implant". A defense with this modifier is highly resistant. Any effect with a resistance difficulty modifier ...


3

By RAW, you can't because there isn't a written rule that says you can. Spirit Pact has mechanical benefits, and there's no explicit way for a starting character to pay for them. They're meant to be gained in play, via in-character negotiation with powerful magical entities. If you want to go beyond RAW, many of the Spirit Pacts are very powerful. You could ...


3

Your calculations are right, normally this should be 5 (STR Mod 3 + Prof 2) since there aren't any racial, class or feats that would be adding a bonus to your attack modifier. I would guess that there's an additional "Attack Bonus" field filled in somewhere that's adding the mystery +2, either under the Equipment or Combat Tabs. If you're using the ...


-2

in D&D 5e drow get under common and elvish not common and elvish. i know this because i had to take a background that gave me a language so i could get the common language when i played a drow.


3

In the absence of house rules, you probably want to be a druid. They get the speak with animals spell, and they get an animal companion which can be a wolf. Rangers get those abilities too but not until fourth level. Rangers and druids both get a "wild empathy" power which lets them influence animals. Although this power works like a Diplomacy check, it ...


13

In Core, Druid 3 or Ranger 3 will both work tolerably well for this, using their Wild Empathy features to make Diplomacy checks at 1d20+level+Cha (instead of the usual 1d20+ranks+feats+Cha, which can very easily be several points higher). (There is no Wolf language by default, although the Druid has a first-level spell that allows them to magically bypass ...


0

I am assuming that you are creating a character from scratch rather than adding traits to an existing character. The materials that the character might be made out of could be non-standard. The wooden portion could be made from wood infused with dragon blood or replaced with carved dragon bone. Metal plates could have patterns that were etched with a ...


6

Yes, that is correct. When customising a background (instead of choosing one of the existing ones), you need to ask your DM first. Most players will pick one of the example backgrounds.


12

Yes, if your DM is ok with you making a custom Background Everything you've listed looks good to me, but be wary that your DM might not allow custom backgrounds. Allowing players to create their own backgrounds is useful, and often fitting, but can sometimes serve to lessen the impact of a background on a character. Backgrounds in 5e are as supposed to be ...


0

Fluff wise, your warforged could have been made to replicate some of the dragon capability. If you go for this, especially from character creation, you may be the latest creation of the Lord of Blades, which is famous for having a working,technically the only one, warforged-forge (i don't know the specific name in the english version) and he's working on ...


21

Dragonborn of Bahamut The traditional (cheesy) approach is to use the dragonborn template from Races of the Dragon. Dragonborn is an LA +0 acquired template, not inherited, and can apply to warforged. It replaces most racial traits with those of dragonborn. Dragonborn are Humanoid (dragonblood). The fact that dragonborn is an acquired template is what’s ...


10

Most ways of obtaining the Dragonblood Subtype involve having a Dragon somewhere is your family-tree. Such is obviously the case with the Half-Dragon template (One parent is a Dragon), the Dragon Heritage feat (Have a draconic heritage, duh) and many others. But the Dragontouched Feat says: You have a trace of draconic power, a result of dragons in your ...


0

Well, you won't get the exact ability to Dual-Wield Spiked Chains, but if the character is fine with some 'reflavoring' of the weapon (and NOT reliant on other feats or powers that wants you specifically wielding that weapon) might I suggest the Transcendant Ki Focus, a Superior Implement. Transcendent Ki Focus Blinking (When you hit with a ...


-1

Mordenkaine's Magnificent Emporium page 21, Superior melee weapons, two-handed Spike Chain +3 proficiency, 2d4 damage, price 30gp, 10lb reach property flail group you would be looking at weapon proficiency spike chain feat and then flail feats for it.


2

Not until epic levels. Barring weapons that innately support dual-wielding and reach, there are very few ways to dual-wield 2-handed weapons (almost all reach weapons are 2-handed) or to gain reach. The only always-on method of doing so that I'm aware of is the Eternal Defender epic destiny from Martial Power 1. Its level 24 feature, Godlike Stature, ...


0

You might be able to use a whip. The whip is a one-handed superior weapon with the reach & off-hand properties (though see below about off-hand). It was originally published in Dragon 368, but was also later included in the Dark Sun Campaign Setting & Mordenkainen's Magnificent Emporium books. Dual-wielding whips is mechanically identical to ...


0

You should be able to put down an enemy of comparable challenge rating with your character in less than 5 rounds more or less, because in combat there maybe a lot of variables, such as more enemies, difficult terrain, enemy abilities that disable some characters, positioning and such. Therefore the ideal DPRounder is a character thar can put an enemy down ...


-3

I used to have a rule that if you're trying to test balance. Take a character you're checking and have it 1 v 1 a simulated combat against a monster from the manual with the same # of hitdice. If it seems to have a significant advantage against that, and even worse if it always wins--you may have a problem. There are exceptions to this rule--if it's a ...


2

It was mentioned in the comments that damage per round does not matter much since there are many methods of taking foes down without actually damaging them. And even more of that, a character can be highly beneficial to the party even if he doesn’t take out foes effectively. Opening locks, disabling traps, negotiating NPCs, identifying magic items and many ...


2

First I will start by saying that Rogues are pretty bad when it comes to healing, and other leaderish things. They just aren't designed for it and thus don't really have support. I'll do my best to make something that will be passable however. First, we want to avoid the Rogue from using Standard actions to heal if we can help it. This means either after ...


11

KRyan's answer is correct, of course, but if you're bored or whatever... You can try the Same Game Test The basis of the Same Game Test (SGT) is that a character's degree of ability to participate meaningfully in combat encounters is best determined by comparing the character's abilities to creatures it may encounter in the environments in which the ...


12

No, and it wouldn’t really be all that useful You’d have an “average” with really, really wide variance, and that average wouldn’t be meaningful. D&D 3.5 is a wildly imbalanced game. Characters of a given level can have vastly different abilities and power level, and moreover, so can monsters of a given challenge rating. A naively-built monk or ranger ...


7

I'd start out by not thinking of the character as evil, instead I'd play him as sociopath. You might not go out of your way to concoct nefarious evil schemes, but as a general mode of behavior you are not constrained by normal morals in getting what you want. If someone has what you want then it would only be the consequences to you personally than constrain ...


3

D&D 5e is not quite as flexible as you're thinking — there are much more flexible RPGs out there to cater to those who want their game to support any character concept, which exist precisely because games like D&D don't. Since the ability scores are pretty fundamental to how D&D 5e works, none of the limited mechanical flexibility ...


4

The +6 is a mistake. Jeremy Crawford, the rule expert at Wizards D&D on Twitter, finally answered my question: @JeremyECrawford Can you explain the +5 attack bonus with the dagger for the pregen Tieffling Warlock lvl1 ? (+2 prof, +2 dex mod, +1?) #DnD @TheRealYotus It should be +4. I've let the web guys know. Note: I asked the ...


8

I simulated a million stat arrays with each method. I sorted each array, then took the average. Here's what I got: with 3d6×12 method : 10.8 11.5 12.2 12.9 13.9 15.2 with 4d6 method : 8.5 10.4 11.8 13.0 14.2 15.7 So, with the 3d6×12 method, your best stat will be on average 15.2. With the 4d6 method it will be on average 15.7. ...


7

It might be true that the 3d6 method will get you more total modifiers on average, but I think it is important to note that if one is building a Wizard and truly min-maxing, that player would be hoping to roll a single 17 or 18 most of all. The probability to roll an 18 on a 3d6 is 0.46% (1/216), and in 12 rolls that chance increases to 5.42%. The ...


0

Yes your character can meet up with old friends, but no you can't have them give your character free stuff. When you create a character, that character starts with a certain amount of wealth -- generally the DM will tell you how much. For example the DMG recommends that a second-level character starts with 900gp worth of equipment; a 10th level character ...


-1

Magic Gear at Character Creation Gear has a listed cost (see Magic Items in the DMG). Your character has an amount of starting gold depending on level. That gold can be spent on gear even if your character cannot craft it personally. It is assumed that he went, and bought, the gear. From someone who can craft it. Or found it in a tomb or whatever - WBL ...


2

The Dungeon Master's Guide gives DMs advice on how to treat NPCs friendly to the party on page 104. It makes a distinction between Allies, Cohorts, Followers, and Hirelings. Allies The DMG describes allies as: Those who help the PCs with information, equipment, or a place to stay the night. The section describes an NPC, Viran Rainsong, that gives the ...


-1

Short Answer: Yes, if it's part of the story. Long Answer: Sure, but it may be a bad idea - without knowing the game system and setting, and how they're affected by comparative power levels, it may not be balanced and it may not be fun for the whole table. In a video game (particularly an MMO), outfitting a new character is called twinking - it's generally ...


5

The rule is this: If there's a line somewhere that specifies a particular class counts as Intuitive, Self-Taught, or Trained for the purposes of generating random starting ages, it uses that column of the table. That's it. If you find a class and can't find anything that specifies which column of the random starting ages table it should use, you (or your ...



Top 50 recent answers are included