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38

You can try to structure your play time so that your life or death stuff isn't hitting until the end of the session. That way if somebody buys it, they're at least being sidelined at the natural end of the evening during the climax of your session so they've played enough to hopefully not feel like they wasted an evening. That also lets them handle new ...


33

Player 4 sounds like a pretty novice/young/both player. I'd try one or more of these: Explaining issue - I'd try to explain the player that there is a difference between kill-everything-that-moves Diablo and your average-rpg-with-some-battles-and-story. It might be that they are not familiar with how to play a table-top RPG, which generally is more about ...


29

No, that is not normal, it's an unusually high kill rate in my experience. When I've been in parties that hit those levels, there have usually been one or two kills per campaign that require resurrection (though more close saves with resurgences and whatnot). It may be due to bad player tactics, weak characters, or the GM runs things tougher than the ...


28

Some game systems have this internal conflict built into them – either deliberately or accidentally – and that's just part of the nature of the game. Not all games suffer this conflict In some games character death is a deliberate feature, and the rest of the system is more-or-less mindfully designed to accommodate character death as a real risk while not ...


27

You can always play in a lower lethality game, but in the question you note that you and your group want this kind of gameplay. So here's some options to keep a player involved assuming character death is present. Have them work on their new character. This keeps them involved with the game and allows you to slot them in potentially later in the same ...


24

Give the players some objectives that they can fail without PC deaths. For example, the party hears rumors that a merchant is willing to pay handsomely for an escort through a dangerous area that is well known for containing threats that should be exceptionally difficult for the players to handle at their current level. If the players attempt to take the ...


20

Some questions to answer in your social contract: Can my character die without my consent? In D&D (and most action-based games) the default answer is 'yes'. Subquestions to ask: Will I get a hint that I'm in serious danger? (In 4e you usually won't need one... it'll be obvious that you're low on surges and survivability.) How likely is this? ...


20

Here are some suggestions that we have tried for our 4e game. It does not come up much as we do not have a high mortality campaign thus far. Have backup characters ready. In 4e we have had backup characters in the character builder ready to be printed if we needed them during a session. This can provide a quick pick up right back to where you left off by ...


20

The traditional way of handling PC death in AD&D is for the player to roll up a new, 1st-level character. The bite of death is strong in AD&D, and the intention is that players treat the risks of adventuring very seriously. However, what is traditional isn't universal—plenty of groups made up their own table rules for how to make a character after ...


19

First and foremost, a GM should always remember that the objective of a game is to have fun. The thing is that "fun" can mean different things to different people, and it sounds like what's fun for you to create isn't as fun for the players when it's executed - and the end result isn't all that fun for you either, since you're sharing this issue here. Here ...


19

There are many ways to retire a party. The trivial one is, of course, say that they lived happily ever after. But you can borrow big endings from classical stories, like: The characters, or some of them, become gods themselves. They are not mortals anymore, they are out of space and time, and their stories end there. The characters must make a terrible ...


18

Keep on the Shadowfell is balanced for parties of 5 players The default party size for 4e is 5 players, and all the official modules are designed to be an appropriate challenge for a party of 5. This is not to say that the game won't work well with 3 players (my experience has been that it starts having trouble when you have 2 or less players or 8+ ...


16

I can't find an explicit ruling on this, but In the Pathfinder Core Rulebook, page 562, under Death Attacks it states: "In case it matters, a dead character, no matter how he died, has hit points equal to or less than his negative constitution score." This implies that it's possible for damage to reduce health lower than negative con.


16

Aside from the Same Page Tool already listed, I'd say two things would be worth considering: 1. Emphasize difference in expectation If the group is used to playing one kind of game style, you have to explicitly point out the differences in what you're trying to do. Something that flags me as a potential problem is this: [T]he party meeting each other ...


15

Fundamentally, it is a philosophically unsound extrapolation and pastiche of normal earth religious afterlife myths mapped onto a system that allows for fairly trivial rezzing. The morality of death, when subjected to rigorous philosophical analysis, does not make for particularly good drama or narrative arcs. Determine the philosophy of your universe to ...


15

In the current example text, Player 4 seems not to be warned by the GM nor his own common sense that this will result in a hostile reaction. That aside, if the player is set upon his character suiciding, it's best IMO to confirm their knowledge of the risk, then to let them, then ask why after session. Sometimes, it's a character that's not what the ...


15

Complete Divine (pages 129 - 130) is the 3.5 supplement that covers this. It suggests that, as a default, the following is true: When you come back to the world of the living, you remember in general terms what the afterlife was like, but your memories have a vague, dreamlike quality and you’re unable to recall the specifics of events. Whether the ...


14

does the death penalty require the milestones to be uninterrupted by extended rests? No. It says three milestones, not three milestones without resting. You get a milestone if you do two encounters without resting. Encounter, Encounter, milestone achieved, Encounter, Encounter, milestone achieved, Rest, Encounter, Encounter, milestone achieved — makes ...


13

For 3.5, yes, it is a bit on the high side... but that's also very GM dependent. I've heard of 3.5 games with a death a session, but never played in one. The guys who did, however, knew that keeping a character alive was an accomplishment in that game. I've also seen 3.5 games that went years without a PC death. The average I hear about is 1 PC death per ...


12

Ok, I think it looks like you are only applying the armour+toughness once to the entire damage taken from the devourer hit, whereas the armour+toughness should be used on every hit seperately. Due to the Storm quality, 3 hits with the devourer is actually 6 individual hits. Each hit should have the armour+toughness applied to it separately. The devourer's ...


12

You have no turns if you are dead (or more accurately if you are destroyed) Form the Rules Compendium p197 THE STRUCTURE OF A TURN When a creature's turn comes up in the initiative order, it can do things. A creature's turn has three parts: the start of the turn; the actions of the turn, if any; and the end of the turn. Of course, if a creature ...


12

While not specific to Pathfinder, D&D made it clear that it took time for souls to reach the plane of their deities. Pathfinder, specifically, says reincarnate only works, even in Pathfinder, for a limited time after death, implying that it takes time to reach the plane of one's deity. It fails automatically on unwilling souls. With this spell, you ...


12

It's important to remember relatively few combats are actually with the goal of killing people - the killing or violence is usually a means or a thing in order to get another goal. The three easiest are: Get something (theft, robbery, occupy a location), Defend territory (scare folks off), Ego (thrash them and teach them a lesson, humiliate them, show that ...


11

Is character death "on the table" — that is, will characters be rendered unplayable through non-consensual IC action? For these purposes, deciding to stop playing a character through the device of character death is different. Likewise, there are some games where being "dead" doesn't mean you stop playing, and others where there are "fates worse than death" ...


11

If it's an inexperienced or an immature player, it's most likely a communication issue. I would definitely give them an idea of just how many enemies there are. Also, for younger players, I advise suggesting information the character knows that the player might not, like any ditches or brush piles that might be near by. Even if there is no cover it's not ...


11

And while the setting is reasonably lax about death, and resurrection magic can be had for those who have the coin or power, they’re not high enough level to really access it easily or quickly (and do not wish to have to handle higher-level, read: more complicated, characters). When this is the problem, I like to solve it using the setting instead of ...


11

Are you familiar with the Same Page Tool? It sounds like you had expectations that you tried to convey subtly to the group in-game, but this wasn't overwhelming enough to overturn their existing expectations or the conflicting messages being sent by your campaign kickoff's dominant tropes, so you weren't on the same page. Getting on the same page is the ...


10

This varies somewhat by the tone of your campaign and the system/setting. In some systems/settings, resurrections are relatively easy. In that case, the obvious answer is to perform the resurrection with some sort of minor penalty and then go on. This, though, cheapens character death. In a mostly hack 'n slash, lighthearted game, this is perfectly fine ...


10

I think there is an alternative that is being implicitly disregarded here. Character death is indeed extremely disrupting in most RPGs and one way to deal with it is avoiding it altogether. The alternative course of action is, of course, trying to eliminate some or all of the disruptiveness of character death. So, let's talk about immortality. I am aware ...


10

do you remember the plane of your god when brought back from death? From a Pathfinder point of view, Reincarnate will bring a character back from the afterlife. While reincarnated creatures recall the majority of their former life and form, I see nothing explicit as to memories of the afterlife. It looks like the existence of such memories falls into ...



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