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7

Your dead high elf wizard isn't a high elf wizard when he wakes up in the Upper Planes. He is a petitioner - identical in appearance and personality, but lacking the skills and abilities (and much of the memories) that he had in life. A petitioner is essentially rooted in the plane it's arrived to, and can't be taken away from it; its ultimate fate is to ...


15

Although this has an answer for the Forgotten Realms, the “normal setting” in the PHB is not the Forgotten Realms and there is no canonical answer for just D&D 5e by itself. The DMG goes into more detail about setting, but the basic concept is that the “default” setting of D&D 5e is mostly unwritten so that the DM can build it up from various pieces ...


21

Yes, the Halfling racial feature Lucky works with death saving throws. Whenever you start your turn with 0 hit points, you must make a special saving throw, called a death saving throw, to determine whether you creep closer to death or hang onto life. Unlike other saving throws, this one isn’t tied to any ability score. You are in the hands of ...


2

For purposes of Organized Play, which is about the only time a question like this is particularly relevant, only what has happened in session has happened. What's obviously about to happen doesn't until it happens. This is particularly important for players who have access to multiple sessions per week... EG: Joe uses his character in both Wednesday and ...


18

An author writes 99% of a book, and then never finishes it and won't give away the ending.* The hero is at the figurative precipice facing certain death, but the character's end is never written and the reader can never find out the true ending. Is the character dead? No, yes, maybe, neither — because this isn't a meaningful question to ask about a ...


0

If I think my PC's are being careless I look to myself as the DM first. Maybe I didn't explain it properly? I'll give you how I've handled these situations but first let me say a few things about careless players. They can be drunk, raging at the real world, bored with simple RP, bored with their character, unaware of enemy strength or all combined. All are ...


6

First, the usual rules: LA is included in ECL when calculating XP. The catfolk druid, therefore, had at least 6,000 XP to have ECL 4th (druid 3rd +1 LA), and loses a level from reincarnate. When you lose a level, you go down to halfway between the previous level and the level lost, so 4,500 XP. His race also changed and he loses the LA +1, so 4,500 XP is ...


1

As I already asked some time ago, when you lose a level you actually have your XP set at midway of your last levelup. Had you been level 4, this means 4500 XP. This includes your ECL. Your effective character level, used for all things related to gaining (and losing) levels is 4, as your XP quota tells you when confronted with the levelup table (which I ...


0

It is in keeping with the typical D&D approach to level loss for an under-level character to gradually catch up to their compatriots. If you would kindly open your Dungeon Master's Guide 3.5 to page 38 (in the English printing), you'll find table 2.6: Experience Points Rewards, wherein you'll see that a lower-level character overcoming a difficult ...


0

A few years ago I read an interesting topic: https://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?676099-B-X-Misadventures-in-randomly-generated-dungeons https://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?686509-B-X-Misadventures-Fellowship-of-the-Bling-Volume-II That is NOT D&D5e but I still think that it could be useful for you. Those references - is AP-tread that is centered ...


3

There's an overall balance factor between HP and death saves. Removing the death saves really makes the PCs HP quite low. Monsters tend to get a higher relative HP because we don't really expect them to use Hit Dice on short rests. When a player gets to zero HP, we expect to have a round or two to heal them or just finish the fight and let them spend Hit ...



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