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5

Definitely discuss with your GM, but don't discuss it with the other players unless the GM thinks it's a good idea. I've been reading a lot of John Wick lately (Play Dirty, Play Dirty 2), and he's all about drama in the game. He puts characters in terrible, soul-wrenching situations to push them to change. It's good stuff, whether you run games, or play in ...


1

Find a reason she might wander off from the group while exploring a dungeon or similar dangerous area. I've lost more characters by going off alone. When you don't have the rest of the group there to heal and help you, it's a lot easier to get ganked by monsters or traps. Better yet, don't tell the rest of the party where you are going, so they can't find ...


4

I'm assuming this (warning: TV Tropes) is what you mean by The Load. Talk to your GM. Tell him or her, "I'm not having fun with this character like I expected to. I'd rather play something else. I'd like to retire this character. She's just not enjoying adventuring."


48

You don't need to go to the effort of plotting to kill her off. What you do need to do is speak to your GM and your group and tell them what's on your mind: your character doesn't have much to do, and you'd like to roll up a new one. At that point, you may still need to come up with a plan of how your character can exit stage left, but you'll have their ...


4

The real question is: why do you want to kill her off? Claim that your character fell in love with a local farmer and married a local tavern keeper. Why not discuss with your DM the idea of just rolling up a new character? I would suggest that you start the new player at level 7. The other thing I would recommend is giving your DM a good GAME reason for ...


2

Caveat: You say you want to run a lethal game, but what do your players want? Rememeber that everyone's there to have fun, and some players may not enjoy investing lots of time and effort creating a character, only to lose it. From this point on, I'm going to assume that you've discussed this with your group, and that everyone is already on board with ...


2

"Otherwise bad things might happen" is really where the game is getting the most fun for a lot of people. I very much advocate letting those bad things happening and then have the players deal with the consequences later once they are back to full strength. This makes the game as a whole generally much more rewarding for the players, as the understand that ...


5

All of the fluff about narrative and story aside, Fate, like all other RPGs, has a mechanic for death; if you get taken out of combat and your opponent wants you dead, you're dead. Regardless of how anyone may feel about what death actually means in the greater scheme of the story, the rules themselves are pretty simple. So, how do you make Fate "deadly"? ...


16

I'm going to create a completely system-agnostic answer here, but it will probably apply to you, especially considering the example of A Song of Ice and Fire. The reason that characters can drop like flies, even semi-randomly, in A Song of Ice and Fire without it detracting massively from the story, is because the story isn't about them. If someone whose ...


3

I agree that sudden character death is mostly boring. It is the threat of sudden character death that makes a story interesting. Unfortunately, that threat has to be real, otherwise it won't have any effect. Players will soon stop believing you if you say they could die any moment but they just don't. One mechanism I used for a cyberpunk Fate game I'm ...


2

There's a very simple principle. Your concession has to be acceptable to your opponent. If it is not, you can discuss and find a middle ground. If you still cannot get on the same page, then the conflict isn't over yet. Continue until someone's taken out. Just like a game of Go, the conflict ends when everybody agrees that it ends.


5

One super hacky and relatively system independent fix would be to figure out what that character would have done (on average) in the fight and make that already have happened or have the ability to happen due to terrain/environment/NPCs/...etc. Something possibly triggerable by the PCs but not directly from their characters. For example, if the major ...


-1

Betrayal is always a good one, too. One of my players played a character that he designed to betray the entire group. Of course, with the gaming style of my players, they all had a part in helping design the character (they all love a good story, instead of just hack n' slashing... they save all that energy for FSPs). The whole time the character ran with ...


0

First consider: There's no "best way", of course, as it's a creative problem with varied circumstances, and depends on the players and their tastes. It's certainly not best to try to control other people and make them treat anything with respect. It doesn't work, can backfire, and isn't an effective way to get what you want. Not all players want to play a ...


7

This answer assumes that one of the things interfering with the memorability of your character deaths is disrespect and looting from peers. We have done a few things in our campaign that address this, which you may consider in yours. Our campaign features occasional character death. One of my concerns as Game Master was that looting the corpses of one's ...


1

I have nothing to offer in terms of how to stage a death memorably. It's a difficult task because so much of the circumstances will be beyond your control. But you've already got some good advice on how to make the best of things. What I've always found to be a more important moment in making a death memorable is what happens afterwards. What do the players ...


34

What can be done to ensure that even a random death down a pit trap is handled respectfully so the player will remember their character well, rather than the rest of the players gathering around to loot their still-warm corpse? Honestly? There's not really much you can do (in the general case). In order for a death to be meaningful, there must be ...


6

I've found 2 ways that really work for the groups I've run with. But first thing's first: random die rolls, and things they really couldn't avoid are a no go. That would only serve to annoying the players. Make sure it's early in the campaign (so rerolling isn't such a chore). Make it seem kinda obvious that fighting here would get you killed. "This giant ...


1

This one can be difficult because a character can die to so many things... The pit fall trap gave me an idea, which you might be able to homerule it abit. (For keeping the character memorable.) You could have the character roll a reflex save to use his weapon to try and latch onto the wall, the unfortunate thing is that he fell to far for the others to grab ...


7

I would argue that Yes, using the Monthly Raise Dead power requires the normal component cost of Raise Dead. The description of the power says that it works as the ritual Raise Dead, which would mean it inherits all costs that the ritual would normally require except that it takes only 1 hour to perform. The daily power that emulates Gentle Repose ...



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