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1

I had something similar happen to me when I was playing, my char had already taken the Leadership feat and had a dog trained for battle. I critically succeeded the Handle Animal check on a hyena after slaughtering its goblin owner. My DM handled it by treating the hyena like an NPC. His level matched my own. But he would not follow us and engage in battle, ...


2

TL;DR: Usually, the same as the average level of the other PCs. But, a new player with no D&D experience should learn the ropes with a level 1 character first. They'd most likely need to gain some levels with that character before joining your 9th-level party. The Dungeon Master's Guide actually has something to say on this very topic. On page 134, ...


-1

I'd like to take a different direction from the other answers here - what happens at level 11 that might cause the designers to make this level more difficult to attain than the others (comparatively)? At level 11, almost every class gets a transformative power. Level 11 is the level that casters get level 6 spells, which involve things like instantaneously ...


7

The simplest way to answer this is to look at the total XP, not the XP to next level. From each level, the XP required to reach the next level looks like this: (this graph borrowed from Dale M's answer) This doesn't make a lot of sense, which is the source of the confusion. However, if you look at a character's total XP as they progress through the ...


6

First, the usual rules: LA is included in ECL when calculating XP. The catfolk druid, therefore, had at least 6,000 XP to have ECL 4th (druid 3rd +1 LA), and loses a level from reincarnate. When you lose a level, you go down to halfway between the previous level and the level lost, so 4,500 XP. His race also changed and he loses the LA +1, so 4,500 XP is ...


1

As I already asked some time ago, when you lose a level you actually have your XP set at midway of your last levelup. Had you been level 4, this means 4500 XP. This includes your ECL. Your effective character level, used for all things related to gaining (and losing) levels is 4, as your XP quota tells you when confronted with the levelup table (which I ...


0

It is in keeping with the typical D&D approach to level loss for an under-level character to gradually catch up to their compatriots. If you would kindly open your Dungeon Master's Guide 3.5 to page 38 (in the English printing), you'll find table 2.6: Experience Points Rewards, wherein you'll see that a lower-level character overcoming a difficult ...



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