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42

Well, I don't think I need to tell you that it's within RAW, per the spell description of Fireball [emphasis mine]: A bright streak flashes from your pointing finger to a point you choose within range then blossoms with a low roar into an explosion of flame. Each creature in a 20-foot radius must make a Dexterity saving throw. A target takes 8d6 fire ...


36

There are no facing rules in 5e, by default. Thus, one provokes an OA leaving an opponent's reach no matter how you imagine the characters are faced. The reasoning behind this is that the round represents six seconds of movement, thrusts, parrying, bobbing-and-weaving, &c.* In your example, the answer is: yes, Atone would provoke an OA from Dip. If you ...


26

This meta-game accuracy is a purposeful feature of using the optional grid rules — that kind of tactical detail is the whole point of using a grid. An obvious alternative that eliminates miniatures-based player precision is to not use the optional grid rules. There's some discussion of imprecise AoE handling on DMG page 249 (in short “make a call, consult ...


24

I have experience playing the low levels. I can briefly summarise the impact as follows: It will make encounters much harder. With many characters dying in combat, and possibly a few total party kills as well. This can be demoralising, but some players might be up for it. But something perhaps easily overlooked is that it removes a wonderful suspense ...


14

Here's One Player/DM's Experience For the DM, 5e is much, much easier to manage and the combat flows much faster than 3.5e. High-powered monsters have much simpler mechanics and strategies, and yet they still "feel" powerful and interesting - thanks largely to the "legendary actions". Thanks to the simple advantage/disadvantage mechanic there are fewer ...


13

No But the argument is not so straightforward. The problem with this question is that the RAW are murky enough to allow for some leeway in interpretation. Going by RAI, the intention was clearly to use Two-Weapon Fighting with one-handed weapons, and not game the system by attacking with a versatile weapon while holding it in two hands, arguing that it ...


13

At 1st level, a single critical hit from all but the weakest monster can reduce a PC to 0 HP. For example, kobolds (CR 1/8) do 1d4+2; that's a maximum of 10 on a critical, fighter types should survive - most others are at 0. Hobgoblins (CR 1/2) do 1d8+1 plus 2d6 if an ally is within 5 feet of the target, an average of 25 and a maximum of 41 on a critical; ...


12

Prepare for a long answer... This is, ultimately, a sign of a flaw in your enemy tactics, not in the player's use of Fireball. Wizards are scholars with years of study and practice under their belt. Sorcerers literally have magic in their blood, a part of their very being that they have grown up with and come to know as well as any part of their body. So ...


11

The invisible condition states: An invisible creature is impossible to see without the aid of magic or a special sense. [...] The creature’s location can be detected by any noise it makes or any tracks it leaves. Invisible is not the same as hidden as pointed out in the answer to this question. Unless a creature is hidden, other creatures know the ...


11

It's all about objectives... When designing (or interpreting, in the case of published adventures) encounters, you must identify the objectives of all parties involved. Truth be told, one's objective is rarely hold my ground until death. (There's a nice example of this, though, in DDEX3-10: ) Much more often an objective might be hold my ground until ...


11

In the earliest rules, Chainmail with its Fantasy Supplement (Gygax & Perren, 1971), the fireball referenced the catapult rules for its mechanic. That includes the following optional rule (2E, p. 10): Fire Optional: Roll two different colored dice. One color is for an over-shoot and the other is for an under-shoot. To decide which number ...


10

Here is some notes on how I have handled this in the past. Talking is a free action during combat, assuming the NPC shouts that he does not want to fight and makes a non-threatening stance. As long as the conversation moves toward "lets stop fighting" it probably will. Assuming the PC wants to react, typically what I have seen is the player ready an action ...


9

A fireball is in D&D what artillery is on a battlefield. Just like intelligent soldiers know how to deal with artillery, intelligent monsters know how to deal with magic users. Continuing the military analogy there are basically five techniques: Dispersal, so that AoE will strike a limited number of combatants Cover, using natural or manufactured ...


8

No. When you switch your grip to use both hands, the longsword is no longer "in the other hand" because it's now also in the first hand. "Other" denotes that it is not in the first. Two weapon fighting no longer applies.


8

Fleeing an encounter is difficult in Dungeons and Dragons, Third Edition Tactically, a creature wanting to end an encounter moves away, usually by taking the action run (Player's Handbook (2000) 127) or double move (PH 126-7), and often provoking an attack of opportunity (making it wise for creatures to exit engagements before they're right about to die).1 ...


8

Does a 5E upper-level combat encounter take just as long and require the same amount of planning and forethought as an upper-level 3.5 or Pathfinder combat encounter? No. Based on my experience of running multiple sessions of 5e it requires significantly less prep than 3.5 or Pathfinder. If I had to peg it precisely I would say it is between preparing a ...


7

The DM typically determines if a creature's routed In a core-only Dungeons and Dragons 3.5, campaign there are no morale rules. Creatures fight to the death if the DM thinks they would and opt to flee or surrender if the DM thinks they would. This can be problematic for the DM and players alike. For example, a beginning DM may not realize exactly how ...


6

A Note This seems to be more of a culture problem more than a rules problem. Lindybeige has a video about this. It seems that RPG players (in general) jump to lethal force too often, and without any form of escalation to that lethal force. Once in combat, it is a race to 0 HP, with the winner suffering death by deadly death, because people have it in their ...


6

The DM's Call This is one of the cases where there isn't a simple rule like, "After 3 rounds of evassive manuvers... etc..." This really does require the DM to make some calls. Those calls should be based on a few things: How much real damage is done? What is the NPC's motivations? What did the players say, and how persuasive would it be to the NPC? ...


6

As shown in the linked questions, it depends. The rules don't specify an action cost for dropping something - does this mean it has no action cost, or does it fall under "interact with an object"? If it's the first, then you can drop one focus, then "interact" to pick up the other as part of your spellcasting action. If it's the second, then you're using ...


6

No, from 3e onward there are not morale rules in the core books. Everyone shouts "DM decides" when this comes up, but I like to decide what I want to decide and what I want to randomize. (You may as well have the same fiat-vs-roll argument about everything from random encounters to hit rolls. To me it's easier to have a way to randomize it and then overrule ...


5

An invisible creature is not hidden; therefore everyone knows where it is. If it takes an action to hide (which it can do because it is invisible) then only those whose passive Wisdom (Perception) equals or exceeds the creature's Dexterity (Stealth) check knows where it is. Those who know where it is can attack it (with disadvantage). Those who don't can ...


5

As a DM, it appears from this (non) problem that you are missing the point from two directions. Taking the adversarial position, you versus the players. That isn't what this game is. Your efforts are somewhat like a good teacher or a good coach: give your players challenges of increasing difficulty so that they grow. The players aren't playing against ...


4

Here is how I would handle it - which as far as I can see it not written anywhere under RAW. So my premise is to not break any existing rules, and not take any liberties/assumptions. Please note that "combat" is defined for D&D simply to make it easier, flowing from RP'ing to Combat happens in an instant, and moving back should happen in the same manner. ...


4

What you, the player, can do on your own. Assuming we're in intiative, let's look at some actions available to you: (Free) Talk. There's a word for this: shouting "parlay!" or "truce!" or even "hold your fire!" can do a lot, especially if you (the player) actually shout it at the table. I've been known (as a GM) to break initiative on this alone. Attack. ...


3

Whatever your DM rules is correct The rules themselves are ambiguous and turn on what "holding in the other hand" means and since the rules are written in English not Boolean logic this is not clear. One interpretation is that so long as the weapon is "in the other hand" it doesn't matter that it is in the first hand as well. This allows the use of a ...


3

Yes, there is nothing wrong with your build, and you can draw the handaxe again as a free object interaction. The Dual Wielder feat removes the light limitation on your weapons. It also gives you an extra object interaction (might not be needed, but gripping the long sword might be considered an object interaction by some DM's). PHB pg 165: DUAL ...


3

There's an overall balance factor between HP and death saves. Removing the death saves really makes the PCs HP quite low. Monsters tend to get a higher relative HP because we don't really expect them to use Hit Dice on short rests. When a player gets to zero HP, we expect to have a round or two to heal them or just finish the fight and let them spend Hit ...


3

25 short spears. But the answer also depends on the training of the spearmen. (excellent answers from the other contributors) You can assume that any competently trained spearmen - ranging from the town guard to the Roman legions - have specific training in maneuvers to hem in, drive, corner, capture or execute any [correct smaller] number of enemy. ...


3

I should note - I am speaking mostly from experience, and attempting to back up as much of this as possible with RAW notes. TLDR; Yes, 5e should be shorter. From practical experience, I find the planning that goes into the fights is generally fairly simple. Typically a party will answer the obvious questions about their role (who will attack the mages, ...



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