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36

The action you described not really a readied action. It's more like a "colorful" Dodge Action. Either dodge or a readied action will cost one action - they are equivalent in game mechanics. If the player wants this to be a readied action, there's no reason to correct them on the term. Disguising the Dodge action as a readied action You can indulge the ...


20

There Is No Difference When [you have advantage], you roll a second d20 when you make the roll. Use the higher of the two rolls… (PH 173). Even though you're rolling two dice, you are only using one of them, and thus it's a normal, everyday, vanilla critical hit.


17

Yes, 8 kobolds all going at once can be very swingy at low levels. To help this, don't roll for their damage - just use the average damage number. I break monsters up into groups of three to five, to avoid this problem. For example, you could have two groups of three kobolds. Roll initiative separately for each group. That way you might get something like:...


17

It would look like being a 3rd-level Monk (PHB p. 78): Starting at 3rd level, you can use your reaction to deflect or catch the missile when you are hit by a ranged weapon attack… It's just not something that's reasonable or feasible for someone to do without specific training — even top-performing baseball batters can't reliably react usefully to a ...


12

You're not surprised, but you are caught flat-footed, which basically means that while you did see the enemy, you didn't react first. You're not actively dodging attacks yet (marked by the loss of your Dexterity bonus to AC), and you haven't assumed a defensive stance (fighting defensively) - you're not even waving your weapon around (no attacks of ...


10

No, it's not broken. The two points you highlight make sense and work like the following, but they're still only part of the story: Advantage for the attacker in the dark means “I, the target, have no way to notice when and where from I am attacked, which makes it harder to avoid.” Disadvantage for the attacker in the dark means “I, the attacker, cannot ...


7

RAW: rules for baseball are not included. RAW that should inform the ruling(s) to come: the Monk has a class feature, Deflect Missiles, that accomplishes a lot of what you're talking about. It's a reaction, not a readied action, and it works on damage reduction. It's keyed to DEX, level, and a d10 roll. So on one hand, you don't want to too-easily allow ...


6

I have always used "passive initiative", and found no problems with balance or tactical calculation. I started out this way for two reasons: to reduce my workload and to give the players the pleasure of knowing just how good or bad their own roll was. I find it a minor bummer for players to think they rolled really well ("I got a 19!") and find out that it ...


6

The rules of the game don't go in such detail, the simulation provided is not so granular. While true that ample detail and fine granularity are provided for many little things in the game, the game does so for the most probable combat (and non-combat) actions, and leaves the rest to the DM to decide. Ultimately, Pathfinder is a roleplaying game, and as ...


6

Yes, but it probably isn't as effective as you might think Giving the leash to the squire (supposing the dog is loyal to them as well) means that the squire can well give orders to it, to the best of their ability. But the squire is an NPC, loyal to the knight but not directly controlled by the player. So without the knight taking the time to give orders to ...


5

I've been successful in developing good combat grids by chaining more than one room together. This way, the outnumbered team can keep retreating further inside (maybe acquiring reinforcements on the path), and the outnumbering party can try to set flanks and move in parallel rooms, trying to surround them. This keeps the fight from staying stagnant (everyone ...


5

Uncanny Dodge At 2nd level, a barbarian retains his Dexterity bonus to AC (if any) even if he is caught flat-footed or struck by an invisible attacker. However, he still loses his Dexterity bonus to AC if immobilized. Based on this description, I would say that Uncanny Dodge doesn't come unto play in this situation, as you were not caught flat-footed (...


5

This does of course, fall outside the realm of RAW, and into the land of interpretation. As such, I'm finding it hard to see the conflict. Giving orders to the dog and having it fight is not combat, any more than summoning a police officer. It's little different than holding the horse while the knight goes out to fight on foot. Both are helping the knight to ...


5

Free action for the giver, move action for the receiver The closest I've seen the rules come to this is the general rule for manipulating items: In most cases, moving or manipulating an item is a move action. Examples of "moving or manipulating" that relate to this are: Draw a weapon Pick up an item Sheathe a weapon Retrieve a stored item ...


4

Because initiative should've already been rolled, Vesuvio should've benefited from taking the action total defense Both the goblins and Vesuvio are aware combatants and should've already been acting in initiative order. The goblins were aware of Vesuvio's presence (although probably not his location) else there'd be no reason to take the ready action.1 ...


4

Use (appropriately and carefully) the Arm section of the Called Shot optional rules detailed on Paizo's official website, if you're the DM. Show those rules to your DM if you're a player, talk it over whether the rules are OK for yor team and game. Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow deals 1d6 points of Dexterity damage and 1d6 points of Strength ...


4

It depends on how realistic a game you're running. In real life, when you pour oil on a sword, the oil basically just runs down the sword, and only a very thin coating will remain on the blade. This coating will either evaporate before you can do anything useful with it, or burn for a moment or two before burning away. In the best case, you get a bunch of ...


4

Is this allowed? What would it look like mechanically? So, that sounds like fun, but is it realistic to play "baseball" with slingstones? TL;DR - Nope There are a lot of factors that might be reasonable about it, but there is one big problem: a baseball batter only needs to hit a ball pitched into a specific strike zone. The kobolds won't be aiming for ...


4

Our party barbarian wanted to choke out another NPC half-orc that she had challenged to a fight. Our DM followed the following pattern: On the strangler's turn, a regular grapple contest is made, with the strangler at disadvantage. This represents the difficulty in getting your hands/forearms/legs around the neck of the enemy. Since it's simple ...


3

As you are fishing for house rules, I feel okay bringing in something from an earlier edition: D&D3.5 had the Choker; a monster for whom strangling opponents to death was their whole schtick. It came with a well written out mechanical ability that allowed it to do so. On more than one occassion I've succesfully applied this same ability to other ...


3

What happened is actually quite normal for a short range vs melee combat. Most melee weapons need to be engaged to work and your blaster pistol is optimum at short range, both PCs and all enemies have 1 free maneuver on their turn so the back and forth you describe happens a lot. The core combat system of EotE is mean tot be quick and simplistic because ...


3

Unless the character specifically has a feat or other trait that allows them to reflect projectiles, this shouldn't be possible. There is a common misconception that slings are weak, glorified toys. Many depictions of slings show the rocks being fired slower than a person could throw them, and they're depicted as a nuisance rather than a real weapon. In ...


3

I have played HotDQ and have been tempted, at first, to do the same thing, group Kobolds together in order to save time. However, I have come to realize that this would enable the Kobolds to gain a lot of benefits they would possibly not have when rolling initiative normally. Let me elaborate. Enemies such as kobolds often have features that make them ...


3

Yes, this all seems perfectly fine. However: Your retainers are commoners who can perform mundane tasks for you, but they do not fight for you, will not follow you into obviously dangerous areas (such as dungeons), and will leave if they are frequently endangered or abused. The squire is still a retainer and will not willing bring the dog ...


3

There are two parts to this question. One is about whether you can buy a mastiff and have it fight for you; the other is about whether a squire can help with this somehow. Can you buy a mastiff and have it fight for you? The rules say that you can buy a mastiff. (PH p157) I haven't been able to find any rules about training a mastiff or getting it to ...


2

Sure. In fact, in the Second Darkness Adventure Path there's a pirate ship (the Teeth of Araska) that has a Chelish captain with his thumbs cut off in its brig, which even makes it canonical. My pirate PCs thought that was a snazzy idea and tends to have someone with cut-off thumbs in the brig now that they killed the previous crew and took the ship. If ...


2

"Always" is a pretty strong word, but yes, you have a point. Picture a situation where the party wants to retreat to a small room - for example, they're horribly outnumbered and prefer to engage the enemies in a confined space. This'll likely create an encounter where the party is in no immediate danger of being defeated during a single "roomful" of enemies,...


2

This situation is not covered explicitly by the rules, but comes up quite often in one of the games I run due to a fighter with the Disarming Strike maneuver. I use a "degrees of success" roll using Strength (athletics). See the DMG for a description of this type of roll. I set the DC as 5 + distance kicked. Since things like reach are measured in 5 ft ...


1

I typically try to break up enemies into 3 to 5 "groups" of combatants to help smooth out the swinginess and to make the battle a little more tactical. You can do this a few different ways. Break out a group. So 8 Kobolds would move in 4 pairs that each roll separately. Move in similar units. Kobolds + Ambush Drakes. They both have the same initiative, if ...



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