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13

Reactions and bonus actions aren't ever something you “have”, they're something you do. And there is a limit on the number of times in a round that you can do them. As a consequence, it doesn't make sense to ask if you “have” either one when you are surprised. What matters is whether you can do things that count as a reaction or as a bonus action. The ...


11

All the Warcaster feat does is negates the need to have one hand free to cast the Somatic component of spells, so long as your hands are occupied by either weapons and/or a shield. It doesn't allow you to cast spells through a weapon. Inflict Wounds allows you to make a melee spell attack not a melee weapon attack. As such, unless otherwise stated in the ...


3

While there is no "touch attack" in 5e D&D, let's walk through how Inflict Wounds works. Inflict Wounds has both Verbal and Somatic components. Somatic components require: A free use of at least one hand to perform these gestures. (p. 203 PHB). The simplest thing to do in the usual case is to drop or sheathe the mace and cast Inflict Wounds, per ...


3

Yes. it is round based. If you have the ability to take a Bonus Action you can only do so on your turn (unless other wise specified by the special class technique or what-have-you that grants you a bonus action. Similarly if you have a feature that grants a Reaction, you can take it on your turn OR on someone else's turn if its a triggering effect such ...


2

I used this for a few sessions as a DM and I really liked the setup. My players liked it less. I appreciate both sides of the argument. Things we liked Initiative bonuses are a much bigger deal, because you get to act earlier more often. Your super-initiative Rogue or Ranger doesn't have to suffer because they rolled poorly on initiative once or twice. A ...



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