Tag Info

New answers tagged

7

Because they are different. Note, the water described in a marsh terrain is a "deep bog". The water described in aquatic terrain is just water. The environments are intended to be different and thus have different rules. The rules are not "complimentary" or additive. Total cover for being underwater is somewhat of an oversimplification of refraction and ...


4

There seem to be a few misconceptions going around the table. Misconception 1. My players are not very tactical and like to run directly into encounters Explain to your players that if they wish to be sneaky ninjas, they need to act like sneaky ninjas. If the rest of the team rushes into battle, the Ninja should be staying back and hiding out, making sure ...


5

Stealth is fun. Shadowdancer may be one of the most popular Prestige Classes in 3.5e, and that is solely due to the Hide in Plain Sight feat. Many players enjoy the thought of sneaking invisibly to the enemy and rolling insane backstab/sneak attack damage. Unfortunately, stealth in D&D is not always that fun. Now, the backstab part is awesome, and ...


2

If waiting a round kills your fun, you need to learn a little more patience. Sure, the GM should have fun too. But if the rest of the group is supportive, and the player needs an extra round or two here or there to have fun with their character - man up and do it. That's really the bottom line, though I would go on to say that limiting Stealth to "a chance ...


5

I've been in this situation. Or rather, I've been in a situation similar enough: One of the PCs had started flying ("Who manipulates gravity"), and all the thugs attacking them were bound to the ground. I hadn't prepared for that situation, as that character had only just joined the group. Fortunately, Numenera has a convenient mechanic that works perfectly ...


8

I'm going to answer this question in a system-agnostic manner, as the question posed is one I've had to address a great deal in my own games despite never actually running Numenera specifically. (I tend to run superhero games, so it's quite a regular occurrence that I have to balance combats for a diverse group of character abilities.) Your first priority ...


0

For extremely large-scale combat, roll "buckets o' dice" ala simple miniatures combat rules; role a d6 for each combatant, a 5-6 is a hit, and hits kill one npc etc. Most GMs who get into large-scale battles involving player-led armies vs enemy hordes develop or borrow a special ruleset for those encounters, often based on handfuls of dice. For anything ...


2

Two options: enemies die, players slaughter them easily, they waltz through this area. level up the enemies so that they present at least a smidge of a challenge. An easy way to do this on the fly is to have the enemies realize they are being out-classed, so that they pull back and regroup. Give them better weapons, have them call in a "leader" who ...


1

Are the enemies smart enough to realize they can't harm their opponents? If so, they should probably flee, with any plot/character ramifications that entails. No reason to stick around when you have no chance of winning. Then again, if you want to have a fight at that point in the adventure, it's perfectly acceptable to increase their damage, along with the ...


0

I tend to say "yes" when I run games. This is simply because some enemies, like Orcs, have traits or feats, like ferocity or Diehard, where they can continue fighting below 0 hp, though in a staggered state. If enemies just die at 0 hp, then the balance of your encounters gets thrown off a bit.


2

So @KRyan is completely correct that flying is asymmetrical. Over time this becomes an absolute problem for really everyone. Your 12th-level two-handed fighter is basically useless against a dragon unless he's running around with a flying carpet or some version of the Fly spell. As Pathfinder is designed there are really two important methods that melee ...


5

Fighting flyers can be frustrating to flightless creatures. Fortunately, there are some tricks a monster can pull against a flyer, and further means for you as a DM to limit or negate the flyer's advantages. Before diving in, there's something worth noting: If your player is genuinely excited about playing a flyer (and not just about a cheesy "unbeatable" ...


0

From my experience, gunslingers are just not going to end up doing as much damage as other combat focused characters. Damage isn't everything though and they are quite powerful in their own way. Being able to deal damage vs touch AC with a weapon is incredibly powerful. A fighter has the best BAB you can get because it needs it. He needs to be able to beat ...


0

I don't know if this is exactly completely RAW but this is what I did. Get the biggest gun you can, most damage as possible. Every last bit is important. There's a feat in PF that lets you double, triple, then quadruple your damage with each shot. Vital shot it was called and its improved versions. Then you enchant your gun to have double crit range, take ...


1

At least at low levels, this is not as one-sided as it appears. Hovering like that requires a DC 15 Fly check to remain in flight, and until the character has invested some skill points and gained some levels, that's not an automatic success. At later levels the problem remains, although there are other sources of flight available by this point.


4

Flying is completely asymmetrical. Because a flying creature can move in 3D, they have literally infinitely more options for movement and positioning than do grounded creatures. There is absolutely no response to it for most creatures. Ranged attackers tend to do OK, obviously, and of course anyone else with flight is fine, but melee, grounded creatures ...


2

The Rule in question: from Page 192, Blood and Smoke, or from Page 240 from God Machine Chronicles (and not in Demon). Stun Gun Die Bonus 0, Durability 2, Size 1, Structure 2, Availability •, ••, o r ••• Effect: A stun gun is designed to deliver an overwhelming amount of electricity to an assailant in order to shut down her ...


2

The feat Step Up triggers only versus a 5-ft. Step Following the link, you'll see that the 5-ft. step is a specific action. Although other actions allow movement of only 5 ft. these don't meet the feat Step Up's conditions as moving only 5 ft. is different from taking a 5-ft. step. The game provides no rationale It's unclear in the rules how the character ...


-1

Why not take the 30 second turn timer idea one step further? Drop initiative rolls and ask all of the players to simultaneously attack/move with their characters during each 30 second interval. This will cut combat time by ~50% (from ~180 seconds to ~90 seconds) and will add more realism & tension to fights.


1

Wow. 25-30 rounds per encounter, and it takes an hour to resolve? Consider my mind blown. That means each round takes about two minutes. That's 20 seconds per person assuming a six-person group to complete every character and monster action and all the interstitial chatter in between. Typically, D&D 4e gets complaints of "taking too long" thrown at it ...


-2

The things you are already doing are great, however one of the weaknesses of 4th edition is that its combat system is based so heavily on miniatures... My solution to speed up most combats was to remove the miniatures and move the combat to theater of the mind. I used minis when tactics were extremely important, or during climactic fights, but not outside ...


-1

If you're running a system that turns combat into a long deliberation, and that's not what you're into... that's a flaw in the system, for your purpose. Being an oldbie I'd just drop 4e and go back to 2. (Moves go fast, but the DM has to adjucate quite a bit). Unlimately it comes down to what you like; some people love crunchfests. I consider battles to be ...


14

There are really only a few ways to speed up combat, and most of them really depend on what is bogging you down. Here is the advice I'd give if you really want to make sure you get through as fast as possible: Limit Turn Time. This is the biggie, and you're already doing it with the carrot method (providing a chip worth a +1 to any d20 roll). That's great. ...


-2

The 30 sec rule you mention rubs me in a wrong way. Instead of rewarding faster decisions, try "punishing" lightly the indecisiveness. Try to pre-agree upon that if 20-ish seconds is not enough to make up the player's mind in turn-based phases, then the ruling will be that the PC dazed off, or are being too cautious or hesitant, and thus miss his/her ...


5

Normally, you can't benefit from two different touch attack spells at the same time, because: (Taken from FAQ for the Magic rules, see under Range: Touch, FAQ on the right): If a spell allows multiple touches, are you considered to be holding the charge until all charges are expended? Yes. And from the combat rules: Holding the Charge: If you ...


4

Yes, to both of your questions. I can see why you'd be confused, since typically you can't hold the charge on a spell if you cast another spell. However, elemental touch isn't actually a touch spell. It's a personal spell that targets you. By casting elemental touch, you are giving yourself the ability to make a special melee touch attack for the next few ...


0

Given that the hair is magickal and regrows instantly, I really can't see any built in restriction about dividing it into as many strands as you want. Obviously you can't maintain more than one grapple but you can impede many people at once under the right circumstances. This is quite important as for instance, with greater grapple, which makes maintaining ...


1

First off, you can benefit from only one shield, as has been stated by @KRyan. Armor/Shield Bonus: Each type of armor grants an armor bonus to AC, while shields grant a shield bonus to AC. The armor bonus from a suit of armor doesn't stack with other effects or items that grant an armor bonus. Similarly, the shield bonus from a shield doesn't stack with ...


8

You cannot benefit from two shields at once. They both provide Shield bonuses to AC, which do not stack with one another. Moveover, as you note, those bonuses become void the moment you actually attack: rather than give a bonus to AC, the bucklers start giving you penalties to attack. Your attack routine therefore looks like this: Main: +1 (BAB) +3 ...


2

If you want to keep it simple, whereby you don't have to make extra rolls or add complete systems, then you have (ab)use the HP system itself. If Hit Points represent the way characters deal with combat and injury then their maximum Hit Points represent their full ability of dealing with combat and injury when fully rested and healed; and current hit points ...


2

Always hiding numbers from the players is my favourite way to play as it forces them to roleplay out their interactions with the world. I don't let them know what their stats are numerically either—they each have descriptions instead, and they learn more precisely how strong or intelligent they are by what they manage to do.



Top 50 recent answers are included