New answers tagged

0

On my opinion, a dog (INT == 1) is already capable to understand that the enemy flock leader should be attacked first [i.e. the human sitting on the horse]. On my opinion, INT == 2 is the limit, from which we can talk about a primitive fight strategy. On INT == 1, the creature will do for what it was trained for, or what his instincts say (what can be also ...


1

There are some forum discussions on various sites on the Internet, such as this one, but notice that it is a similar topic but the original asker there is asking "how many fights per session can you comfortably fit in". If you really mean to focus on the game-time to real-time ratio, that may be harder to find, since that can range from 1-second-per-turn (...


13

We had a similar discussion in one of my groups and we agreed to the GM’s explanation of how he chooses the target on behalf of creeps and NPCs: Pretty much all sentient beings attack the target first that they perceive as the biggest danger for whatever reason (if they chose to attack at all). A better explanation would be, that they try to eliminate the ...


23

Enemies get to say which one of you they want to attack. Usually the mount is easier to hit, but killing it doesn't stop the rider from attacking on foot. Attacking the rider is harder, but more effective if successful (especially if the mount decides not to fight on its own). The monster is making a tactically sound decision by attacking you, since you are ...


18

Under the Mounted Combat section of the SRD, it states that If the mount provokes an opportunity attack while you're on it, the attacker can target you or the mount. The rules make no mention of monsters being forced to attack one or the other, so they attack at the Dungeon Master's discretion.


2

You can become invisible during combat, but using Cloak of Night is an Instant action that's not reflexive. If you are rolling to vanish from sight, that's what you're doing for your round that combat; you cannot shoot or strike and then try to use Cloak. That means it's best to disengage first, as the people who are fighting you have a chance to oppose you ...


2

I find this a pretty good resource. Though it is incomplete, as it only lists how to get ability modifiers. Here's a quick screencap of the initiative section for you. Another good (and more thorough) resource can be found at Brilliant Gameologists which should have the information you require. Happy Optimizing!


11

Extra damage dice are typically applied separately on a critical hit The Rules Compendium on Multiplying Damage says Sometimes damage is multiplied, such as on a critical hit. Roll the damage dice and add all modifiers multiple times. Total the results. Extra damage dice over and above a weapon’s normal damage, such as those dealt by precision damage ...


10

Let me start by addressing your stated questions first, then make some observations. Should these monsters have acted more? Not as such. Monsters should never act on their own. The monsters react to things the player characters narratively do, just like the rest of Dungeon World. As this is a very narrative game, much depends on the context you've ...


5

When everybody looks at you to find out what happens The one that's easy to miss is as follows: Player: "I punch the Giant in knee" GM: "That sounds like Hack and Slash. Roll for that" P: "11" G: "That's a hit. Roll damage" P: "9" everybody looks at you to find out what happens GM: "The giant collapses onto the floor, grasping his injured knee. One of ...


0

The d20 system, which is maintained by Wizards of the Coast, has been adapted into many different, yet compatible rule sets. This means that you can (usually) pull many different rules from many different sets into one cohesive game. For example, you can find many compatible rules and items in D20 Modern or D20 Future, plus D20 Apocalypse (a supplemental ...


5

There are two possible answers one could give here, since you didn't ask explicitly for the answer to comply with the RAW. The cold, hard, RAW (Rules As Written) answer Just as @Sebkha's answer states, on Pages 267–268 of the Dungeon Master's Guide there is an official treatment of Renaissance-era, Modern-era, and Futuristic-era weaponry. If all you would ...


0

The important thing to consider if you are to use D&D for such a setting is on how you interpret HP. D&D is intentionally sketchy about it but typically most players still think of HP damage as 'damage', 'taking blows/cuts'. Under such an interpretation it will be quite hard to get the feeling of Walking Dead. If you instead interpret HP as ...


1

I treat thrown weapons as ammunition similar to an archer's arrows. This is a case where the spirit of the law outweighs the letter. It doesn't make sense to preclude using throwing daggers or javelins yet allow an archer's bow.


0

There are a number of issues with handling modern weapons in a D&D game. And a number of solutions. You could treat magazine-based firearms as being similar to repeating crossbows, and they do roughly the same amount of damage as said crossbows but with more range (treat bursts of fire as a shot instead of tracking 30 shots individually). Meanwhile, "...


0

When considering damage for any weapon, including modern day firearms consider their damage against a regular person, who in DnD tends to have 2-3 hit points. Think about a glancing blow to the limbs, more than direct hits to the chest or head, which would be more akin to a critical hit. A small, low-caliber handgun might be no more damaging than a dagger ...


8

I would echo @nvoigt's answer: D&D was simply never meant to do this. It can be illustrated by a simple example: realistically, modern guns have a high chance to kill or disable anyone they hit. However you approach replicating this makes a mockery of the D&D hitpoint system. If you're set on using D&D as a system, then a possible alternative is ...


0

To expand on nvoigt's answer, D&D is all about special people to accomplish heroic deeds. A cleric doesn't need a morphine shot to cast restoration, a wizard doesn't need a rocket launcher to cast fireball, and a fighter doesn't need an adrenaline needle to use his Action Surge. These are things they can do because they were destined to be heroes. By ...


8

I think this is really into the realm of DM prerogative. I see two ways of looking at this. Making a second attack requires you to choose a target and thus interact (again) with your weapon. Thus once you have thrown your weapon for the first attack you cannot control it to make an additional attack. Especially for a spear or javelin, there's no simple ...


15

Yup, but it's a little tricky. Your spear or javelin is a weapon, so it qualifies for horde breaker. The tricky bit is that you've got to make your second attack with the same weapon. Not another instance of that type of weapon, but with the same weapon. So after throwing the spear or javelin you've got to retrieve it and attack with it again against ...


77

A good and solid answer was given already: Modern firearms and grenades appear on page 268 of the Dungeon Master's Guide. Please upvote that answer if you find it useful, I'm just copying it to comply with the guideline that every answer should stand on it's own even if the others get changed or removed. However, a paragraph like this has been in all ...


38

Modern firearms and grenades appear on page 268 of the Dungeon Master's Guide.


0

In D&D 3.5, the experience awarded for an encounter varies depending on the level of the party and the Encounter Level of the enemies. If the difference between the two is too high, then no experience is rewarded. (Refer to the XP Awards table on DMG pg 38, and the two tables on DMG pg 49). If the PCs are so overwhelmingly more powerful than their foes,...


5

I've done similar things, although in 4e rather than 3.5e. I think the technique is broadly applicable, but that 4e is a little more geared for the technique, as I will discuss below. I generally took two approaches to things: 1) In cases where the PCs simply and completely outclassed the opposition, and I deemed there to be effectively no chance ...


2

That is the correct interpretation of these abilities. Raging hunter pounce gives you a full attack, which means that any abilities and effects you have that apply to full attacks apply here too. However, I do want to note that Path of War is currently undergoing errata where the high amounts of damage, particularly from full attacking initiators, is being ...


7

Monsters and PCs don't use the same math for their statistics — monsters don't have Dexterity scores, let alone a bonus for a high score. There isn't even a “hidden” Dexterity bonus to AC included in monsters' final AC numbers that you can reverse-engineer. You can see this in the Halfling entry in the Monstrous Manual/Compendium: even though they are ...


2

I once used a form of possession in a crypt-like dungeon, where the main evil was a spirit that would/could temporarily take control of a random PC, turning that person against the party. The PC got a chance to resist the urge to do something nasty each round they were possessed, but could do nothing else during that time. There was a pattern to when/how ...


2

As you've taken on the responsibility of the DM (which can in its own right be more fun than being a player), there's really only one piece of advice someone can give you: Award experience wherever you think it should be earned Did the player role-play sufficiently outside of combat to receive the experience? If so, don't hold back XP simply because he ...


19

Stephen King wrote about terror. The 3 types of terror: The Gross-out: the sight of a severed head tumbling own a flight of stairs, it's when the lights go out and something green and slimy splatters against your arm. The Horror: the unnatural, spiders the size of bears, the dead waking up and walking around, it's when the lights go out and something ...


0

First of all the -10 penalty looks relly exaggerated and I definitely think you should drop it to -5 or so. Resurrection is impossible Maybe their souls will be devoured by devils. Maybe the living shadows will turn the PC's into one of their own kind. Players knowing that they won't be able to get back their characters will definitely be more cautious ...


2

Combat is rarely scary. It's what comes before and after that matters. It doesn't matter what you do as DM, combat is really just a matter of shouting out spell names and attacks and rolling dice. There can be the suspense of not knowing how it will come out, but I have never, ever seen a combat which was psychologically scary. Whatever fear-factor comes ...


4

How to make combat encounters terrifying? Terror/horror mostly happens in the mind. To set the mood, turn the lights down low in the room where you are playing. You could go a step further and not use electric lighting at all, but only light four or five long burning candles. Now and again extinguish one or two of them. Later re-light some candles if ...


29

If they aren't scared of death, make them scared of negative modifiers. DMG pg. 272, Lingering Injuries Nothing is stopping you from having a monster tear a guys arm off in battle with a particularly vicious strike. The kind of magics needed to reconstruct a limb are a lot harder to come by. Other things you can run into are things that can cause real ...


1

I use improvised weapon mechanics to simulate this. I'm going to assume they already have the target grappled since trying to choke something you don't have a hold of is a bad episode of the Three Stooges and not a combat tactic. So when somebody grapples something and wants to strangle it they have two options: Bare hands = 1 + STR for damage Tavern ...


1

In your particular case I would take the following approach: Did the PC stand idly by while the others butchered the "old man"? Yes -> give him the XP award, but call his alignment into question - severely! (Openly or not, depending on how your group functions, but be sure to make a note that he is slipping, and make sure that he is aware of this). No -> ...


6

Taking a bit of a different tack here. Remember that unlike previous editions, 5e allows the GM considerable leeway in leveling characters. It is even suggested as an optional rule in the DMG (p 261), that the DM just periodically levels the party up when he deems it appropriate. You can do away with experience points entirely and control the rate of ...


8

If you don't want to give him "old man murder xp" give him "Roleplaying XP" for sticking to his character's convictions. You can also feel free to adjust this (you are the DM) as you see fit. For example, for the main group members of my party, I typically give them half xp if they are not present for a session (but their character is there "in game"). ...


0

The enemy is knocked out According to RAW, Miniman is right, the enemy is dead. But if you consider the spirit of the rules, as in rulings over rules: A good attack roll does not mean big wounds, it means big success. The character wanted to knock out the enemy, and she succeded. Rolling a lot of damage means it was knocked out unusually thoroughly. A ...


2

According to the Dunegon Master's Guide, all party members receive experience from defeating a monster, regardless of their contribution. When adventurers defeat one or more monsters - typically by killing, routing, or capturing them - they divide the total XP value of the monsters evenly amongst themselves. If the party received substantial assistance ...


3

If they are present for the fight in some form (even for sleeping the whole fight like I did once...) then yes. Usually XP is usually awarded as a group to keep everyone in line in terms of power. After all, the rogue might not have been able to learn about a political connect if the fighter had not protected him. People missing sessions cant be avoided so ...


17

Charging Last one first: you can't “charge” someone's back when they're facing you, because charging has to be a relatively straight, well, charge at the intended target. It's definitionally not charging if you're not running straight at them. A charge can't involve stopping to turn around. (If you're coming to AD&D 2e from D&D 3.5e, this may seem ...


2

The main reason is avoiding attacks of opportunity. You can't pass through an area within reach of your opponent without provoking an attack of opportunity. This means with an opponent with a reach of 5 feet, starting just out of reach you have to travel 16 feet just to go around them. IF you are already in melee you have to leave melee, which again provokes ...


1

I would rule that a shield bash should be treated like an offhand attack under the two weapon fighting feature. Since it is not a light weapon, I would count it as an improvised weapon that will do 1d4 bludgeoning damage with no positive Str bonus, and you lose the shield bonus to A.C. until the next turn.


6

Only when the attack actually follows through. It triggers on you using the attack action or full-attack action, not for any other action, including initiative actions like readying.


0

I would like to add that the ambidextrous talent removes the -20% off-hand penalty and thus makes it worthwhile to have a weapon in your off-hand that does not have the defensive quality (only parrying weapons have this). Furthermore, if you have 3 attacks, ambidextrous, quick draw and a pistol in each hand, you can attack twice, then use quick draw to ...


2

As you are fishing for house rules, I feel okay bringing in something from an earlier edition: D&D3.5 had the Choker; a monster for whom strangling opponents to death was their whole schtick. It came with a well written out mechanical ability that allowed it to do so. On more than one occassion I've succesfully applied this same ability to other ...


10

Our party barbarian wanted to choke out another NPC half-orc that she had challenged to a fight. Our DM followed the following pattern: On the strangler's turn, a regular grapple contest is made, with the strangler at disadvantage. This represents the difficulty in getting your hands/forearms/legs around the neck of the enemy. Since it's simple ...


-2

I'm going to take a "real world" approach here that meshes with the 5E game mechanics, so I hope you'll follow along. tl;dr For me, to save headache and adding too much rules, use advantage/ disadvantage rulings (more specific) There's several things going on here, and I'm going to try to tie them in together in a tidy package. For sake of argument a ...



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