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14

There are a number of elements in the Smallville RPG that are potentially derived from the indie scene and could be called "innovative." Rather than physical or mental characteristics, the main attributes of a Smallville character are Values based on their dedication to certain theme elements — Duty, Glory, Love, Truth, Justice, and Power — and their ...


9

The Watcher never rolls against himself. In cases where the Watcher character is unopposed, such as this, they use their action to apply a die from their datafile (one of the ones that would be in their dice pool) directly as an effect. So, a Watcher character with Godlike Strength d12 could spend their action smashing the heck out of a Scene and add d12 ...


7

If a villain wants to do an action that doesn't target a specific hero, what happens? It works. Either the heroes try to prevent it (and then, they are the ones rolling against), or it happens automatically. There would be no point in having the villain try to do his 'villaining' unresisted, and fail just by himself, right? So, no rolls. On the other ...


5

I would say that it is perfectly possible to run a game without all of the roles filled. While they represent all of the typical roles in a heist, you don't necessarily need to have them all. The Hitter and the Mastermind tend to come into their own when things go wrong, so I can see those being a bit easier to do without. That said, I think that you ...


5

There is a Marvel Heroic plugin for G+ Hangouts. We use that. It allows not just die rolls, but color coding for keeping die results or die type, and "click to keep" flexability; which allows you to keep more than the normal amount of dice (like if they pp to add more dice). In addition it has a Plot Point tracker. Edited to add: @Jay suggests that the ...


5

As written, the Assert rules (p66) don't explicitly say, so it's up to you. But, there are clues suggesting that it's reasonable. Complications are basically the Fixer's Assets, and the game blesses the players using them. ("Complications and Player Cleverness", p 112-113) The game also lets players create assets that change NPCs. "The Role of Assets" ...


5

Let us use simple math and probability. The standard starting doom pool is 2d6. So for starters we get difficulty < 4 66% of the time with d6 effect. That is pretty easy and not really challenging to most heroes. So what would challenge the heroes? Let's say that a difficulty that they can overcome only 30% of the time is really challenging. How many ...


4

The "spotlight scene" doesn't necessarily exclude the other heroes, but the focus of the attention should be on the wounded character; the trade-off here is one additional dangerous scene for him or her rather than losing the character for the rest of the Act or moving the timeline forward enough for them to heal. (It shouldn't be the next Action scene ...


3

The Core rulebook came out on April 2nd; with that, you have everything you need to play the game by itself. The book includes all the rules, the Crew Sheet, and a recap of all the Episode of the show and hints on playing them. Unless you really want to play the Adventures from the Echoes of War line, you don't need any of them.


3

You're in luck. The Cortex-Plus Hackers Guide has what you're looking for: If the Gamemaster rolls a 1 on his dice, this is known as an Opportunity, and any player can spend a Plot Point to step an existing Complication back to a smaller size die. A d6 becomes a d4, and a d4 goes away. If the Gamemaster’s dice include multiple 1s, you may step ...


2

I believe that RPG.net had an interesting article about it -- basically, instead of the standard "attribute plus skill", it changed the focus to "attribute plus motive". If your character is about honor, then you do better at things that focus on honor. So, it's less simulation and more story-telling -- instead of letting the best person win, it's more ...


2

I've found that the Doom Pool is best built through introducing Complications early for the PCs to focus on. Rather than pitting them immediately against a villain, allow them to use their efforts to fight smaller independent problems; in "Breakout," for example, I introduced things like "Blackout d10" and "Panicked Crowd d8." This gives them a chance to get ...


2

Well, I have an answer of sorts, as Cam Banks answered to my question somewhere else. Since Cam has an account here, I will remove this answer if he ever passes by. Here is his answer: There is actually an order in play here. Firstly, he exploits his own stress, including it in his reaction. After rolling the dice for his reaction, his stress is ...


1

From Firefly Echoes of War: Serenity Crew: This release was first featured in Gaming in the 'Verse: Gen Con 2013 Exclusive. This title is the stand-alone version. You will need this product, the Gen Con Exclusive, or the Firefly RPG corebook to play Echoes of War adventures. In theory, this is true. However, the reality of it is a bit more ...


1

I've only played Heroic, but according to the Hackers Guide (page 111), under Action there's a list of ways to use an opportunity. I won't copy the list here, since you already have the guide (and I encourage others to get a copy, it's an excellent resource). Also, page 194 details the Heroic rules for Watcher opportunity use.


1

I ran MHR for a one-shot just fine using chatchyourhare.com's dieroller and Skype. The combination of text chat, VOIP, and a visual die-roller made the game work pretty well; the one issue is that assembling dice-pools is slowed, since you can't simply show the die as you pick it up. chatchyourhare.com's dieroller Note that the catchyourhare die roller is ...



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