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52

Honestly the best option here is to talk to your DM. Since it sounds like the rest of your party agrees with you on the matter of the fumble tables, it might help if you had at least one other player to back you up, although probably no more than that to avoid making the DM feel overwhelmed and defensive. Explain that you as players don't find the fumble ...


43

No, it does not hit. From the Pathfinder Reference Document (emphasis mine): Increased Threat Range: Sometimes your threat range is greater than 20. That is, you can score a threat on a lower number. In such cases, a roll of lower than 20 is not an automatic hit. Any attack roll that doesn't result in a hit is not a threat. To threaten a critical hit ...


35

Yes, if you roll a natural 20, it will be a critical hit despite your -5 penalty. If the d20 roll for an attack is a 20, the attack hits regardless of any modifiers or the target’s AC. This is called a critical hit, which is explained later in this chapter.


34

No, a Crit Fail doesn't automatically overrule Advantage. The Advantage and Disadvantage section of the PHB clearly states: Use the higher of the two rolls if you have advantage... (pg.173) Nothing in there says anything that would suggest rolling a 1 would cancel out Advantage so you would still take the higher of the two rolls. The Rolling 1 or 20 ...


33

Yes, because confirmation has the same modifiers as attack (all pluses and minuses). As written in SRD: ...you immediately make a critical roll—another attack roll with all the same modifiers as the attack roll you just made.


30

RAW No damage dice => No dice to double Sucks, but them's the rules. So a critical hit with an unarmed strike does nothing more than 1 damage. The tables in the player's handbook doesn't list a "1d1", just 1 damage. "1" is not a dice roll, it's a number. Of course, the designers do seem intent on making unarmed strikes do 1 damage. I doubt it's a typo, ...


28

YES From page 196 of the PHB: CRITICAL HITS When you score a critical hit, you get to roll extra dice for the attack's damage against the target. Roll all of the attack's damage dice twice and add then together. Then add any relevant modifiers as normal. Note that this only refers to the attack - it doesn't say weapon attack, or anything else ...


27

Yes, Sneak Attack and other striker damage abilities (Hunter's Quarry, etc.) are maximized. The only dice you roll are those dice that you get specifically because of the critical hit. For example, bonus dice from a magical weapon. Everything else is automatically maximized. See here. From Critical Hit [ddi] Maximum Damage: Rather than roll damage, ...


25

It Makes Critical Hits More Likely That's it, really. The confirmation roll makes a critical hit less likely, because you have another chance to fail. How much less likely depends on the difficulty of the roll to hit the target (as to confirm you just need to hit). If you need an 11 on your d20 confirmation roll to hit, then you're going to not get a ...


25

I strongly recommend that you urge your DM to ditch fumble and critical tables altogether. It sounds like this will be difficult to do, but you’ll find the game much improved – and, I think, so will he. This is because... Critical and fumble tables have myriad problems The Dungeon Master’s Guide even strongly recommends against them, for good reasons – and ...


25

Correct, critical hits do not have to be confirmed. Any 20 on an attack die is a critical hit. (Fighters of the Champion archetype eventually score critical hits on rolls of 19, and then 18, also.) Rolling a 1 or 20 ...If the d20 roll for an attack is a 20, the attack hits regardless of any modifiers or the target's AC. In addition, the attack is a ...


22

Nothing special happens 3.x As a critical confirmation roll is an attack roll, a natural-20 automatically hits (and therefore automatically confirms), but aside from that there is nothing special about having rolled 20 twice in a row. 4e There is no critical confirmation roll. A natural 20 is an automatic hit, and if the total is more than the target ...


22

No, critical hits must be linked with attack rolls. I checked with Jeremy Crawford on Twitter and he says that critical hits must come from attack rolls: @JeremeyECrawford No, since only attack rolls can score critical hits. In response to @Kevinaskevin Can my Rogue's Assassinate cause my Wand of Magic Missile to crit against surprised creatures? ...


21

Easy: 9-20. Let's start by disproving that 11-20 is the highest threat range possible in D&D 3.0/3.5. Take the Improved Critical feat, which doubles your threat range. Also take Disciple of Dispater (Book of Vile Darkness, 3.0) up to 8th level, which triples it. These abilities explicitly stack. D&D multiplication rules turn this into a quadruple ...


21

The Dungeon Master’s Guide is right to warn you about such houserules. The game was not designed for them in mind, and the game’s math reacts poorly to their introduction. In general, some of the biggest problems are that critical and fumble tables Increase swinginess, which disproportionately punishes PCs because they see many more rolls than does the ...


20

Bane has no bearing on a Critical Hit. From page 194 of the PHB: If the d20 roll for an attack is a 20, the attack hits regardless of any modifiers or the target’s AC. In addition, the attack is a critical hit, as explained later in this chapter. Since a Critical Hit is determined by the roll of a natural 20, and not by the end result adding up to 20,...


20

There Is No Difference When [you have advantage], you roll a second d20 when you make the roll. Use the higher of the two rolls… (PH 173). Even though you're rolling two dice, you are only using one of them, and thus it's a normal, everyday, vanilla critical hit.


19

From the Player's Basic Rules: Critical Hits When you score a critical hit, you get to roll extra dice for the attack’s damage against the target. Roll all of the attack’s damage dice twice and add them together. Then add any relevant modifiers as normal. To speed up play, you can roll all the damage dice at once. For example, if you ...


19

By strict reading of the text, Yes. Although you are not rolling to hit, the spell itself says it automatically "Hits" and therefore fulfills the requirement of: In addition, any "hit" you score against a creature that is surprised is a critical hit. Critical hits with spells are double damage dice. Therefore, each missile you produce would deal ...


19

Apparently, you cannot. At least not any more. Jeremy Crawford, the official rules sage of Wizards of the Coast, was asked in December 2015: @JeremyECrawford Can I cancel a "Natural 20 Critical Hit" using Cutting Words? 9:26 PM - 2 Dec 2015 He responded at that time: @LeonardoNocchi Yes, you can. 6:48 PM - 3 Dec 2015 My reasoning at that time ...


17

Yes, they do. But, because of they deal plain damage (no damage roll) their "maximized" damage is equal to their base damage. However, they could have traits or powers that trigger on a critical hit, or they could receive such properties by a nearby leader monster. For example, the Ankheg BroodlingDDI's mandibles (from Monster Manual 2) work this way: ...


17

It's neither the first attack nor the first round. As far as RAW is concerned, if you're surprised, you're surprised at least until the end of your first turn. From the Player's Basic Rules, page 69: The DM determines who might be surprised. If neither side tries to be stealthy, they automatically notice each other. Otherwise, the DM compares the ...


16

From the definition of Critical hit on DDI (or the Rules Compendium, pg 216): Natural 20: If you roll a 20 on the die when making an attack roll, you score a critical hit if your total attack roll is high enough to hit your target’s defense. If your attack roll is too low to score a critical hit, you still hit automatically. Precision: Some class ...


16

No, it doesn't. The critical deals (1d6-1)+(1d6-1). From combat#TOC-Critical-Hits: A critical hit means that you roll your damage more than once, with all your usual bonuses, and add the rolls together. From combat#TOC-Damage: Sometimes you multiply damage by some factor, such as on a critical hit. Roll the damage (with all modifiers) multiple ...


16

Yes! Attack rolls for spells are attack rolls, per the page you cite, so they can critical.


15

No. You can only use a free action to attack once per round; from the Player's Handbook Update PDF (pg 19): Free Actions Page 267: Replace the “Free Actions” bullet in the “The Main Action Types” section with the following text. This update limits the power of builds that capitalize on recursive attack power combinations. ✦ Free ...


15

I would say the answer is no, you can't apply the same feat twice. I don't have a strictly RAW basis for this, but these are my reasons: Wording If the wording was "You can apply two effects of a critical feat", then the answer would be yes - the thing that is doubled is the effect, and that can be the effect of any critical feat. But here the text reads "...


15

The result of a roll is not determined until the DM says what the result is, even in the case of a 1 or 20. There are cases, such as attacking an illusion or something immune to that damage type, wherein the DM lets the player roll just to hear the dice clatter.


15

Yes for the Champion's instance of an expanded critical range. Improved Critical specifically says you score a critical hit on a 19 or 20. A critical hit is a type of hit; by scoring one, you've also scored a hit. If the word 'critical' wasn't there, the ability would certainly read as if you couldn't miss on a 19 or 20. This is in contrast to if the ...


14

Yes. Critical successes are a general mechanic in GURPS and not limited just to weapon skills. Just like critical hits, they always occur on rolls of 3 and 4, and on 5 and 6 for effective skill 15+ and 16+ (respectively). See "Degree of Success or Failure" (Basic Set: Campaigns, p. 347) for the general mechanic.



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