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18

No, DR and resistances do not stack. DR only protects against the physical damage type. Resistances apply to other damages types, like fire, acid, electricity and so on. There is no overlap between damage types. In your example, with 10 physical + 6 electricity damage: A monster with DR 5/- would receive 5 physical and 6 electricity damage. A monster ...


11

You're safe... The spell flaming sphere says A burning globe of fire rolls in whichever direction you point and burns those it strikes. It moves 30 feet per round. As part of this movement, it can ascend or jump up to 30 feet to strike a target. If it enters a space with a creature, it stops moving for the round and deals 3d6 points of fire damage to ...


7

In this particular case, the magicalness of the damage matters not. The Barbarian has resistance to piercing/slashing/bludgeoning damage regardless of whether or not it it's from a magical weapon. Thus they have resistance to the damage from Cloud of Daggers. However, if you did encounter someone who had resistance to slashing damage from non-magical ...


5

The answer is on page 145 of the DM Manual. A creature's damage resistance is ineffective against combined damage types unless the creature has damage resistance to each of the damage types, and the only the weakest of the resistances applies. For example, a creature has resist 10 lighting and resist 5 thunder and an attack deals 15 lightning and ...


2

By Raw it isn't possible to walk through a Flaming Sphere, as the spell creates a semi-solid spongy flaming object. However, normal clothes would burn just fine.. if it weren't for a few.. issues. By Raw energy damage such as fire, lightning, or cold deals half damage to objects, so hardness is calculated after the damage is divided by two. Energy ...


2

Ask your GM. Generally, effects that damage characters don't damage the items they're carrying unless some specific rule exception or effect says that they do. This particular case is unusual, however: Most forms of energy resistance are magical in nature and assumed to apply to an adventurer's gear as much as their bodies, but as you've intuited, your ...


2

Only if the resistances are to different types of damage. If they are to the same type of damage, only the higher applies. There are pseudo-exceptions, but they stick out like a sore thumb, because they explicitly say things like, "or your existing resistance to Fire is increased by 5," which still isn't really the same thing as stacking. If neither game ...


2

Resistance doesn't stack unless it's from two different damage types, it's source doesn't usually matter. In a situation were you have resistance of the same damage type, only the highest of the two applies. From the Rules Compendium: Resistance against the same damage type are not cumulative. Only the highest resistance applies. (pg.225) For example; ...


2

All of the Sorcerers features that allow the mechanic you describe say something along the lines of: Your arcane powers ignore any target's resistance to that damage type up to the value of your resistance. (Emphasis mine) So in your case, you would only ignore lightening resistance up to your lightening resistance amount. Untyped resistances would ...


1

Resistances are explained in PBH 197. Resistance and vulnerablity is calculated and applied only once, so whether magical or not since the barbarian has resistance to slashing, they still gain resistance the slashing. If the barbarian was "vulnerable" to magic, then the question would be more interesting. In the end however, the vulnerablity and resistance ...


1

The order you use to apply resistances and damage reduction doesn't matter. In your example, the tiefling is hit for 16 total damage, 10 physical and 6 electric. The adamantium DR takes off 2 points from the physical (leaving 8). The fiendish electrical resistance takes off 5 points from the shocking grasp effect (leaving 1). Ultimately, that tiefling ...



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