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23

The mace provides a magical attack that does bludgeoning damage. There is room for dispute here. Unfortunately, the term "magical attack" is never actually defined (so far as I know), but it is implied that it is any attack by spell or enchanted weapon. That has been the assumption through every edition that I am familiar with. Let's also clear up the ...


17

You take 1/4 the total damage. You are looking at two separate events. The first event is whether or not you are hit with the 'full force' of the attack (your saving throw determines this). You can think of it like diving out of the way of a fireball, or ducking under a column of ice. If you pass the saving throw, you take half (you successfully avoided ...


15

Unfortunately, by RAW, the Werewolf is immune to the damage boost from Hunter's Mark. Like you've mentioned, Hunter's Mark does not specify a damage type, and thus the boost is of the same damage type as the weapon attack. It also does not specifically grant magical properties to the weapon attack, and thus does not allow for piercing the Werewolf's ...


15

Generally 'no', but many staves' descriptions specify 'yes'. Three illustrative examples from the DMG: Staff of Power: "This staff can be wielded as a magic quarterstaff that grants a +2 bonus...." (p.202) Typical +2 weapon, magical damage. Staff of Charming: "The staff can also be used as a magic quarterstaff." (p.201) Clearly a magical weapon, but no ...


14

Page 119 in the DMG has damage thresholds for Airborne and Waterborne vehicles. Galley 20 Keelboat 10 Longship 15 Sailing ship 15 Warship 20 Beyond that, the core books don't talk about damage specific thresholds of any objects. Which puts the rest of objects squarely in the DM's purview.


14

Unarmed strikes are negated by the immunities listed According to the errata for the monster manual, the immunities in question have been changed from immunity to weapons to immunity to attacks. The exact quote is: Throughout the book, instances of “nonmagical weapons” in Damage Resistances/Immunities entries have been replaced with “nonmagical ...


13

In each case, you halve or double the total amount of damage of the given type. Since the STR or DEX bonus to damage roll is still adding to the single damage type it is {halved|doubled} along with whatever was rolled. This applies in just about every case for every individual source of damage. Any other modifiers are applied first, such as a magical ...


12

Yes: Your barbarian has virtually no chance of dying I was intrigued by your claim of "his chance of death is about 0% as long as he was conscious and raging before he hit the ground," and assuming he is at Max HP = 55. In the PMF of 20d6 below, you can see that there is very little possibility of rolling >110HP on 20d6 (in fact, that possibility is about ...


12

Yes, your Half-Orc Barbarian is nigh-invulnerable to death by falling, as a consumable resource. Remember that your relentless endurance and your rages both recharge on a long rest. So four times per long day you can take a header off a skyscraper and be pretty sure of living.* (At least for the moment.) Also, your Bard and Wizard friends can do this, too. ...


12

The mace will overcome resistance to nonmagical weapons Most creatures that have defenses against ordinary weapons will say that they are "resistant to bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing damage from non-magical weapons." The mace does not deal "magical damage"; the +1 bonus to damage from the magic weapon is a bonus to whatever damage the mace would ...


11

Lava deals an appropriate amount of damage for the level of the characters and the intensity of the challenge you want them to face. 4e doesn't use static numbers based on the objective source of the damage; in 4e the mechanics scale with the party, according to the thing's role in the story, in order to challenge the group appropriately. Lava is probably ...


11

Find one as treasure / Go on a quest for it By the book is a little odd to ask for here — the place to find an adamantine weapon is in the game world, not in some rule in the PHB that would give players unfettered access to powerful treasure. For a veneer of by-the-book analysis, unenchanted adamantine items are listed as magic items in the DMG (pp. 146–8, ...


11

I have actually looked into this before, and the answer is yes, they will be treating Fire Immunity as if it didn't exist. I have long wondered exactly why they decided to allow you to break certain character builds, and the teifling with fire damage is one of them. it used to be that you could pick up some kind of weapon to just change all or most of your ...


11

A breath weapon is not a spell. From the Dragonborn entry: Breath Weapon: You can use your action to exhale destructive energy. Your draconic ancestry determines the size, shape, and damage type of the exhalation. Spells require some combination of Verbal, Somatic, and Material components. A breath weapon requires... exhalation... The introduction to ...


9

Yes, it is a magic weapon All weapons with magical enchantments are magical weapons. I don't know if it's specified in the starter adventure, but in the Dungeon Master's Guide, starting on page 135, goes into detail about magical items. And on page 133 specifies the "[t]ypes of magic items include armor, potions, scrolls, rings, rods, staffs, wands, weapons,...


9

Yes, because the damage is "bonus damage." Let's take a look at Colossus Slayer and Hunter's Mark, the ancillary damage-dealers in question: Colossus Slayer: Your tenacity can wear down the most potent foes. When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, the creature takes an extra 1d8 damage if it’s below its hit point maximum. You can deal this ...


9

Jeremy Crawford has finally weighed in: The damage dealt by the hunter's mark spell is magical. #DnD twitter.com/redwullf/statu… 8:08am - 7 Nov 2015


8

All weapons that have a plus and are magic are magic weapons, by definition. Phandelver goes further, and says explicitly that Lightbringer is a magic weapon: On page 25, it is called a magic weapon in the NPC's notes. On page 48, it is called a +1 mace in the Treasure for that area, and… Note the italics in “+1 mace”! By calling it a +1 mace in italics,...


7

Similar to the example from online basic rules, they would take quarter damage. DAMAGE RESISTANCE AND VULNERABILITY Some creatures and objects are exceedingly difficult or unusually easy to hurt with certain types of damage. If a creature or an object has resistance to a damage type, damage of that type is halved against it. If a creature ...


6

Yes, it still can be targeted. The ongoing damage is an effect that lies upon a character and the condition for casting that abilities is, that that target is afflicted with this status. That is why it makes sense to role against that effects also, because you would not like to suddenly have this major effects upon yours. You could also loose resistance and ...


5

No. Errata (as per xander's answer) aside, the intent of the rules is very clear in this regard. Unarmed strikes are not intended to ignore immunities. E.g. for Lycanthropes Damage Immunities: bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing damage from nonmagical weapons that aren't silvered. Note that unarmed strikes are used like weapons (even though they're ...


5

The roll and the appropriate modifier are added together to get total damage. When attacking with a weapon, you add your ability modifier-the same modifier used for the attack roll-to the damage. Let's say for example, a level 1 rogue with a +1 DEX mod attacks with a dagger(1d4) which does piercing damage. He would add the 1d4 + 1, but he also has ...


5

Burn Everything says "Fire Immunity is Fire Resistance" and Level 1 Pyromancy Apprentice says "Fire Resistance is irrelevant". So yes, as the rules are written, this combination completely negates fire immunity for all your arcane fire attacks. Feel free to exploit.


5

4e does not attempt to simulate reality. Effects should have mechanics that relate to their role in the story, rather than what would be "realistic" (whatever that means in a setting with magic). If the fire is meant to be impassible, then it probably does a lot more than just 20 fire damage per round, as well as having additional negative effects not ...


4

The Hunter's Mark damage is from a spell (i.e. magical) therefore it bypasses immunity. Hunter's Mark states: ... Until the spell ends, you deal an extra 1d6 damage to the target whenever you hit it with a weapon attack... The damage type is unspecified so we can safely assume it is of the same damage type as the weapon that was used. If the weapon ...


3

You are completely at the mercy of your DM whether or not you will be able to obtain a magical weapon or mundane weapon constructed from a rare material. The surest way to "tool up" against Gargoyles et al is to play a class that provides you with a magical weapon. Eldritch Knight Fighters can bond to mundane weapons which makes it magical for the ...


3

No As you discussed in your option B, it explicitly lets you bypass fire resistance. Resist all is not resist fire + resist lightning + resist radiant + etc. It is straight up reduction of all damage. If you want to pierce resist all, you need an effect that explicitly allows you to do so (I'm wanting to say there are 1 or 2 effects that let you pierce ...


3

1) Monster with dr 10/ It takes full damage, as Damage Reduction only reduces physical damage from natural attacks or weapons (falling, suffocation, starvation, etc, ignore DR aswell). Frostbite is energy damage. The difference here is that this damage is recovered faster than lethal frost damage. Energy Damage Energy damage is typically dealt by ...


2

DR never affects energy damage, just plain ol' weapon damage. While you are delivering them in one "package", so to speak, treat them as separate and completely normally within the rules to determine the effect of defenses thereon. The part you quote about B/P weapons is only talking about weapon types, it is not relevant in this case. So for a melee ...


2

Yes, if the DM wants it to. No, if they don't. Fire resistance protects against damage with the type 'Fire'. There aren't specific rules for smoke inhalation, so the DM needs to decide how/if to model the problem. You could just ignore it if your group is fine with that. You could model it with fire damage, which I think would be a little odd, but do ...



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