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1

An unbalanced weapon (like a mace, top-heavy) with enough blade to do slashing damage is basically an axe or a splitting maul. "How do I make a slashing mace?" begs the question of what weapon with mace-like qualities would do slashing damage - and the answer to that is an axe, a top-heavy weapon that actually does slashing damage. By recasting what such a ...


15

Now that the official PHB is out, you can find the complete list of Damage Types on page 196. Sonic would be what is called Thunder. The definition actually makes use of the word Concussive: Thunder. A concussive burst of sound, such as the effect of the thunderwave spell, deals thunder damage. If the type of bomb you are referencing is what we have ...


11

Short answer, no. I had this question many years ago and still carry around the printout from the 3.5 FAQ (http://archive.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/er/20070731a). From p76 Many animated objects have hardness scores. What affect, if any, will an animated object’s hardness have on spells used against the animated object? For example, an animated ...


2

The question seems to be over the wording in "apply damage normally" clause. Energy Attacks: Acid and sonic attacks deal damage to most objects just as they do to creatures; roll damage and apply it normally after a successful hit. Electricity and fire attacks deal half damage to most objects; divide the damage dealt by 2 before applying the hardness. ...


5

No, acid and sonic don't bypass hardness. The wording of the Energy Attacks section states that you apply acid and sonic damage "normally". This means that you apply the damage the same way you would apply any other damage. Since the "normal" way of applying damage to objects is to apply hardness, hardness will apply to sonic and acid damage. The line ...


-2

Yes, dealing sonic/acid damage to items applies the same way it does to creatures. The answer is in your question. Break your paragraph into 3 separate sentences: Acid and sonic attacks deal damage to most objects just as they do to creatures; roll damage and apply it normally after a successful hit. (Hardness does not apply). This rule invokes the ...


-3

Yes, acid and sonic damage bypass the hardness of most objects. Despite the fact that the Hardness section quoted states "Whenever an object takes damage...", specific trumps general and the Acid and Sonic energy type entry under the other quoted section states: Acid and sonic attacks deal damage to most objects just as they do to creatures; roll damage ...



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