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29

Let's break this down a little bit using the Basic Rules you have available. Page 73: Attack Rolls To make an attack roll, roll a d20 and add the appropriate modifiers. If the total of the roll plus modifiers equals or exceeds the target’s Armor Class (AC), the attack hits. Pretty straight forward. You roll a D20 and add modifiers, in ...


12

In 3.5, the base damage for a medium creature's greatsword is 2d6, not 1d12. You may be thinking of the greataxe, which does deal 1d12 damage. Your damage on an ordinary attack is 2d6 + 3 (1.5× str) + 2 (spec). In a rage, your strength modifier is +4 (unless you are high-enough level to have an improved rage), so this rises to 2d6 + 6 (1.5× str) + 2 (spec). ...


8

This all explained pretty clearly in the rules, but I can see how confusion might stick if you are new to it all and are starting from some misconceptions. Most importantly, the d10 is used for damage when fighting with a halberd, but you always roll a d20 to see if you hit, no matter what the weapon. (A d20 is used for most checks to see if something ...


7

The damage die seeming less important happens with very highly boosted damage. Your calculations look right on first glance. I do wonder where you got Weapon Specialization, as the four-level splash into Fighter for it seems a waste on a Barbarian, but that's an optimization nitpick, not an answer to your question. Damage with a two-hander is... die + ...


6

It is exactly as you're saying in your last paragraph: you first roll a d20 plus modifiers to see if you hit or not, then if you hit you roll for damage, a d10 in your case plus a different set of modifiers. From page 9, Weapons: When you make an attack with a weapon, you roll a d20 and add your proficiency bonus (but only if you are proficient with the ...


4

James Jacobs says it adds to the damage of the triggering attack (typically, the second claw that hits, though it varies by monster), which is also how the Two-Weapon Rend feat works, meaning that it does not apply DR again nor Power Attack again (nor Sneak Attack or on-hit effects like flaming), because it's just bonus damage on the attack.


1

Simply put, to attack you roll 1 20 sided dice (1d20), you add 4 extra score on top of your rolled score, and now you have your attack score. For example you rolled a d20, and it turns to be 17, now you put 4 to make it 21. Your enemy's AC is 16, so you hit him. Now roll 1d10 plus your damage modifier. Good luck !


1

“Strength modifier damage” doesn't mean anything, because it's two fragments of two different pieces of the phrase. This wording is really common in 4e powers, and makes straightforward sense… once you've seen how to read it, that is. It's a little bit like a garden path sentence though, so it's not really your fault for reading it wrong. How you've parsed ...


1

An ability modifier (strength in this instance), is calculated by taking the strength score, subtracting 10 and dividing the remainder by 2 (round down). So if your score is 18, your modifier is 4. So in the power with a text of 1[W]+str, with a longsword, the damage at L1 with a Strenght of 18 would be: 1d8+4 (plus other modifiers) As your strength ...



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