Hot answers tagged

43

Yes, you must apply all the damage--but you can still leave your target alive. Except in the case of instant death: "when damage reduces [one] to 0 hit points and there is damage remaining, [one dies] if the remaining damage equals or exceeds [one's] hit point maximum." (PHB p.197) Monsters and Death Most DMs have a monster die the instant it drops ...


31

Yes, you can tell DMG p.26 When running a combat, make sure that you describe nonlethal and lethal damage differently. The distinction should be clear—both in the players’ imaginations and on their character sheets. Does this only apply to damage the characters receive? Personally I am happy to take what the rulebooks say at face value: "make ...


22

Your damage does not increase by level. (1) (1) At least not directly. You get more feats, hit more often, have higher base stats, may aquire magic items and get stronger spells. But the raw damage does not increase. If a weapon does 1d6 damage, it does so, regardless of your level. Exceptions will be noted in the damage text.


18

The rule for knocking a creature out is as follows: Sometimes an attacker wants to incapacitate a foe, rather than deal a killing blow. When an attacker reduces a creature to 0 hit points with a melee attack, the attacker can knock the creature out. The attacker can make this choice the instant the damage is dealt. The creature falls ...


16

You cannot (usually) attack twice in one turn in D&D 4e. On your turn you have 3 actions, a Standard, Move, and a Minor. Generally your Standard is your attack, your Move generally involves moving, and your Minor is something like Cursing your enemies. You can downgrade actions from a Standard to a Move or a Minor, and a Move to a Minor, but you cannot ...


16

You can choose to KNOCK-OUT the creature when you deal damage with a melee attack On page 198 of the 5e PHB it says when you drop a creature to 0 hp with a melee attack you can choose to knock it unconscious instead of killing it. From there tie it up with your rope and then wake him up and, bam! You can interrogate your prisoner.


16

No, you do not drop to 0HP, fall unconscious, and take a failed death save. When you are reduced to 0HP one of two things happens: you fall unconscious or you die outright. There is no "excess" damage to worry about, excepts insofar as it concerns the "instant death" rule. We can know this by going back one page earlier: A creature's current hit points ...


15

There are no specific rules regarding this, and the DMG leaves it up the to the DM. Your 1d4 for shattered glass seems reasonable (on par with a dagger); I might even bump that to 1d6 (have you seen what glass can do to someone? It's not a pretty sight). However, there are base guidelines for hazards and traps based on the character level and the amount of ...


14

There is now an official table and rules for adjusting weapon damage across the whole scale. Those are available in the Paizo FAQ. (Announced just a few weeks ago on the Paizo boards.) Size Changes, Effective Size Changes, and Damage Dice Progression: I'm confused by how to increase and decrease manufactured and natural weapon damage dice when the ...


14

No, you can't tell when inflicting said damage. Dale M's quote from the DMG I believe is referring to damage received rather than inflicted (hinted at by the reference to 'character sheets'), that is to say, a character should know the difference between getting battered and being killed. Due to the nature of the game, the player has a very precise ...


13

Rounding rules in 5e were a problem since the beginning. For example, RAW, at level one you do not heal at all from a long rest (half your HD is 0.5 which is rounded down to 0). This issue was addressed here by Mike Mearls, so this time the RAW was actually contradicted. However, in your case it is correct to say the rule no longer applies. Another tweet ...


13

In each case, you halve or double the total amount of damage of the given type. Since the STR or DEX bonus to damage roll is still adding to the single damage type it is {halved|doubled} along with whatever was rolled. This applies in just about every case for every individual source of damage. Any other modifiers are applied first, such as a magical ...


12

Yes, your Half-Orc Barbarian is nigh-invulnerable to death by falling, as a consumable resource. Remember that your relentless endurance and your rages both recharge on a long rest. So four times per long day you can take a header off a skyscraper and be pretty sure of living.* (At least for the moment.) Also, your Bard and Wizard friends can do this, too. ...


12

Yes: Your barbarian has virtually no chance of dying I was intrigued by your claim of "his chance of death is about 0% as long as he was conscious and raging before he hit the ground," and assuming he is at Max HP = 55. In the PMF of 20d6 below, you can see that there is very little possibility of rolling >110HP on 20d6 (in fact, that possibility is about ...


11

Lava deals an appropriate amount of damage for the level of the characters and the intensity of the challenge you want them to face. 4e doesn't use static numbers based on the objective source of the damage; in 4e the mechanics scale with the party, according to the thing's role in the story, in order to challenge the group appropriately. Lava is probably ...


11

The Creature is Unconscious The rule for massive damage is (PHB p.197): Massive damage can kill you instantly. When damage reduces you to 0 hit points and there is damage remaining, you die ... The rule for Monsters and Death is (PHB p.198): Most DMs have a monster die the instant it drops to 0 hit points, rather than having it fall ...


10

Yes, you'll deal an extra 1d6 with every ray that hits. Hex says that: You deal an extra 1d6 necrotic damage to the target whenever you hit it with an attack. And Scorching Ray says that you: Make a ranged spell attack for each ray. On a hit, the target takes 2d6 fire damage. Finally, to make it really clear that all 3 rays count as separate ...


10

The DMG (pages 246-247) has specific information about how objects can be damaged including ACs for different substances and suggested hit points based on size and resilience. These rules can easily be applied to damaging spells too. I'm not going to reproduce the whole entry, but your pile of wood would probably have an AC of about 15 and hit points of ...


9

Your assumption is not correct, only the damage left over from the attack is transferred to your humanoid health. (Think of Wild Shape as a type of "overshield" or "bonus health") Ex: You have 12 HP in your beast form. The barbarian that you are fighting hits you dealing 15 points of damage. This leaves 3 HP left over. So that remaining 3HP is dealt ...


9

Yes, you can reroll each of your attack dice that rolled a 1 or a 2. Just for reference, this is what it says in the PHB: When you roll a 1 or 2 on a damage die for an attack you make with a melee weapon that you are wielding with two hands, you can reroll the die and must use the new roll, even if the new roll is a 1 or a 2. The "When" here is ...


9

A creature takes 4d4 slashing damage when it enters the spell’s area for the first time on a turn or starts its turn there. This 4d4 damage is per time affected (and per creature), not once for the spell. You do not roll once when casting the spell and then deal the same damage to the affected creature each time the spell deals damage; you roll once ...


9

I rule that the targets of these spells only take damage once a turn. Additionally, they don't take damage on the turn when the spell was cast, as per this Sage Advice from Mr Crawford (thanks Airatome). Consider the following example (from another answer here), a wizard (W) and a barbarian (B) are fighting the Evil Bad Guy (E). The initiative order is W ...


9

The Spell does not provide a mechanism for doing damage to the spiritual weapon, the mechanics by which it would save, or its susceptibility. Since nothing is defined, Rules as Written, nothing exists. Maintain concern for Dispel Magic spells, anti-magic areas, or attempts to incapacitate the Cleric.


9

Generally no, it wouldn't be destroyed, or at least the rules don't account for the level of detail a ruling like this could potentially bring to a game. Adventurers presumably carry a lot of stuff, either strapped to belts, stuffed into a backpack, held in their hands, or in their pockets. So if an object in a pocket were to take damage, why not everything ...


9

These rules have two entirely separate triggers, and if a single attack satisfies both, then so be it. The attack reduced the creature to 0 hit points, and it was a melee attack. So you can choose to knock the creature out; it's now unconscious and stable. However, there was leftover damage from the attack equalling or exceeding the creature's maximum ...


9

Neither the section on falling, nor the section on acrobatics make a reference to reducing falling damage in this way in 5e. Therefore it's pretty safe to assume (given the presence of such a mechanic in previous versions) that it's not something the designers wanted to include for 5e. That said, there are other ways provided to prevent falling damage, ...


9

If I were to crate a masterwork blue ice long sword, would it be the same as +1 blue ice long sword? (Minus it being magical) +1 to touch and +1 to damage? For the purposes of attack and damage rolls, yes. For most other purposes, no. The issue is that while attack rolls with the weapon have a +1 enhancement bonus, and damage rolls with the weapon have ...


8

This is clearly written in both the player's handbook and even the player's basic rules, in the respective chapter about Combat. I suggest you read either of those before asking basic questions. From the basic rules, page 73 (emphasis mine, identical text is found in the PHB): ATTACK ROLLS When you make an attack, your attack roll determines ...


8

Historically, chainshot (the technical term) was very much less effective against people than grapeshot (canister of musket balls) or even than roundshot (single ball) precisely because the latter tore up large impaling splinters, and indirect casulaties were heavier than direct. Chainshot was normally fired at masts and sails, in the hope of bringing down ...


8

Your second option is correct. As per Mage: the Ascension Revised (p.151) and Mage: 20th Anniversary (p.543), the successes one gets on a Magickal effect translate into a number of levels of damage, modified by the Spheres used. The Base Damage for most Spheres is two lethal per success on the roll. (Forces adds an extra level; Mind is bashing; Entropy ...



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