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3

Yes, your math is correct Per the Player's Handbook (page 278) (also quoted in one of the other questions you linked): Maximum Damage: Rather than roll damage, determine the maximum damage you can roll with your attack. This is your critical damage. (Attacks that don’t deal damage still don’t deal damage on a critical hit.) Extra ...


8

Equipment takes damage under a variety of circumstances, but most of the circumstances are rare unless a character devotes resources to breaking things Such a character might... sunder a item held or worn by a foe. The character picks the item to sunder. If the sunder attempt is successful, determine if the item breaks by consulting Damaging Objects. The ...


4

Generally, gear doesn’t break unless something explicitly says so. Sunder explicitly involves attacking equipment. Various spells also explicitly mention damaging equipment. Firearms can misfire, as explicitly described under their rules. Equipment with the Fragile property also have an explicit chance of breaking. But without such explicit mentions, gear ...


2

It's complicated While skoormit has pointed out that the average increase for 1 die is 21.43, the overall increase for multiple dice is not straightforward, and highly depends on your Charisma modifier, more so for more dice. I used a small python script to roll xd6. The lowest c dice (where c = positive Cha modifier) were re-rolled, unless there were less ...


1

No. I don't think there is quite a rule that covers this. But the damage from Witch's Bolt's add on feature would be counted the same way as other kinds of no-save damage is counted (Magic Missile for example. It's not a part of the attack roll's damage roll, and thus is not doubled if you roll a critical on the original attack.


2

# Simple Case: Available Rerolls Equal to Number of Dice Rolled # You can expect half of the dice you roll to be below average. You will reroll those dice. For a d6, you are going to reroll the 1s, 2s, and 3s. Those dice (1, 2, and 3) have an average value of 2. The reroll has an average value of 3.5. So, half of your dice will increase by 1.5, on ...


0

So we have to ask ourselves, how likely are we to need a reroll, how many rerolls do we need, and then, how much does this increase our damage output. I'm going to use a d6 for my examples, because, frankly, it's the most common spell die and the one you're most likely to be concerned about. Similar analysis can be done for higher dice values, although the ...


1

When you reroll a die, you can statistically expect to get an average roll. Therefore, you compare what you got to what the average is, and the difference is how much more damage you'll probably do. The average roll for any die is [sides / 2] + 0.5. For example, a d10 is 10/2 + 0.5 = 5.5. So if you rolled a 1 on a d10, you can expect a 5.5 on your reroll, ...


0

As you say, it depends on what you rolled. The average increase on each individual dice you reroll will be (Dice roll average value, I.E. 3.5 on a d6) - (current value of dice you are rerolling). As an example, if you're rerolling 3d6, one of which came up 1, one of which came up 2, and one of which came up 3, you'll see an average increase of: (3.5 - ...


5

Your examples are distinct Damage rolls, in particular, are completely different from any other check, since they do not use a d20, but rather anywhere from 1d2 to 2d6 (and that’s just for player-race-sized options!) plus various “damage bonuses” that vary from weapon to weapon (non-composite projectile weapons get none, light weapons get ...


1

Dexterity and Strength-based checks are affected by Armor Class Penalty. Damage and attack rolls are not thusly affected. That is because, despite being 'rolls', they are not skill checks. Similarly, ability-checks do not (normally) cause damage, they are not attack rolls and they certainly are NOT damage rolls. They may have similarities at a ...


3

They are all distinct. Basically, unless a game says that two different but similar things are the same for some purpose or other, they're not. Otherwise the rulebooks would be three thousand pages long, noting every possible fact and interaction explicitly.



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