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8

Since I couldn't actually find a character sheet like this for The Dresden Files, I created my own. Since I used assets from the Evil Hat character sheet, I'm submitting it to them first to make sure it's OK for me to distribute it, and I'll post it when I do (or make whatever changes they require). But I did want to post images of the character sheet as ...


8

The idea of handing out additional stunts (or aspects - to be honest, I prefer new aspects as it creates a closer tie to the narrative of the game) is the most common within Fate systems (it's the primary mechanic in Starblazer in my mind). That said, one of the game's designers, Byron Kerr, has actually opined on this topic: Create characters as ...


7

In the specific case of an attacker trying to overcome a defender, if you don't get a shift, the defender doesn't take any stress or consequences. See the Resolving Attacks section of the FATE SRD. This kind of equates to "the defender wins ties" though you can more specifically narrate it as a "hit but didn't damage" scenario if you want (not that FATE hit ...


7

Diaspora takes a strong stance on counting bullets, hence the Out of ammo aspect mechanic of firearms. And the approach in the rulebook assumes that the grenades are not weapons but ammunition. When you list grenades in your character's weapon manifest, he is assumed to have a number of grenades ready, and he's out when someone compels the aspect. In that ...


6

A higher skill may augment another one in Diaspora by +1 when they work together. In other words, you get the +1 only if your Stamina is or higher than your Weapons skill. Diaspora p. 10 skill a is amplified by skill b This indicates that Skill A is used for the check. If Skill B exceeds Skill A, then an additional +1 is granted. For example, a ...


6

Absolutely. Diaspora is a Fate based system. Fate is "rule lite," story oriented, and uses minimal dice (called "FUDGE" dice) and character statistics. That makes it uniquely suited to online play. While there are still dice involved, the game does not revolve around your dice rolls and pure chance. D&D, Shadowrun, and other games that follow a more ...


6

Actually, I think the DFRPG would support troupe-style play pretty well! You need to go check out pp.YS24-48 again. The entirety of city creation is done by the group as a whole - it's never really "handed over" to the GM. Characters in DFRPG are made in the same 5-step FATE process as they are in Diaspora (I assume. I've never played Diaspora, something I ...


6

Given the level at which Diaspora usually handles things, I'd model grenades not as individual objects ("I have two grenades"), but as a weapon type representing a collection of exploding things. ("I have a belt of grenades" or "I have a grenade launcher".) Generally, Diaspora doesn't bother to track individual ammunition, and neither should you - FATE ...


5

Shifts and Spin Instead, for every three by which you exceed the attacking roll, you generate spin. Players may use any spin accumulated by them or an ally to gain +1 on their roll. Any number of spin points may be used towards a given roll. Diaspora lets gain multiple spin and spend multiple spin. (This is different from Spirit of the ...


5

There are several places in the rules where they defer to "social initiative", which is just "whoever speaks up first". I point this out because this is incompatible with play-by-post, so looking for these cases and considering how to manage them differently will help the game go smoothly. In particular, the space combat minigame uses social initiative. ...


5

Simple answer In whichever manner the table decides they do. More complex answer There isn't an explicit relationship in the rules. Therefore, there are several approaches to pick from. Entry and linkage options: drive programming determines which route direction of entry determines which route direction picked upon transition Links to slipknots all ...


3

I've played Spirit of the Century with scoped aspects. Players still use only the obvious, but do so in a different manner. They'll grab the most obvious opponent aspect, the most obvious character aspect, and if desperate the most obvious zone or scene aspect. Anything past that is almost always an auto-success... as there's no "diminishing returns" ...


3

I would switch between scenarios. (every significant milestone, or around three or four sessions, but mainly whenever the current "dungeon", "book", or "adventure" is done.) I'd suggest taking a look at the books in the series- there are one or two long term issues throughout the books, but by and large each one is a mystery within the book. What you need ...


3

There are some distinct cases depending on how the success of the roll is measured. Technically, there are no "Ties" in FATE. If an opposed roll result is 0, it may mean one of three things. If the roll is for a subjective result on the ladder, then 0 corresponds to a Mediocre result, whoever was trying to accomplish something achieves a mediocre result ...


3

Here is a novel approach that I have been playtesting for a while for a game I'm developing, based on Diaspora. The initial results seem to be good. It may work for you, and if you try it, let me know how it turned out for you. Ghosts of the past Every character has a secondary sheet where they record every skill, aspect and stunt they ever had, even if ...


3

When they are or become mechanically relevant: They are involved in a roll An aspect is applied to them The players start treating them as mechanically interesting They're already statted up Any time before that is premature or distracting for minor NPCs. However, I do keep a roster of generics on-hand – soldiers, guards, scientists, those green things ...


2

You may as well define a NPC with a single aspect like Linda, the curly computer genius and then only start to detail them as they become more relevant to the story. Once it becomes clear that they need to be more than a scene aspect, you can break out a blank NPC card for them and fill it out on the run as needed.


1

The key reason to play with everything in the open in a FATE game is to give the players enough information so they play a part in making the game interesting. If you've got a pre-prepared card for an NPC before a conflict starts, the players should get to see that when the conflict starts. If you're making things up on the fly, scribble down the important ...


1

I'd suggest that Fate games are generally ill-suited to play by post, as they require a fair amount of 'back and forth' between players and GM to resolve even fairly simple situations that can lead to a somewhat glacial pace of play. That's certainly not to say they won't or can't work, but I don't feel in general they are geared towards that style of play. ...


1

My table's answer Your very precise momentum vector determines where you will end up, since that is distorted by the multiple moving masses in the system, the safest place to control that is the point where all the system's gravity distortion cancels out. (That's why advanced T3 Nav computers can handle a slip a bit further away from the actual zero point, ...


1

Depending on the stories you want to tell, multiple GM can work really well as long as there is a partition of knowledge about things. It can be easy to say "Ah, we'll go see NPC X that I run as a GM and they will give us a boom stick that can kick the Red Court out". So if you game with mature people that is no problems. Otherwise... You could adapt ...



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