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123

No, It's Not You can use AnyDice to visualize dice rolls really easily and see what's going on. The links will show a table with the results for each one. Here's 3d6. Here's 1d18. Here's both on the same screen for easy comparison. Aside from the obvious issue of not being able to roll 1 on 3d6 because the minimum on each die is 1, the numbers in the ...


99

Buy some. The best "replacement" for not having Fudge dice is to buy some! Grey Ghost Press (maker of Fudge) sells a tube of four Fudge dice for about 5 bucks, or a bag of twenty Fudge dice for about 15 bucks, but a lot of places are sold out. However, Indie Press Revolution just started carrying Fudge Dice (four or twenty) to support the FATE-based games ...


76

There are two different styles of pyramid-shaped d4 dice: The purple d4 on the left is read by having the number at the bottom be the result of the roll (in this case, a 1). The light blue d4 on the right is read by having the number at the point be the result of the roll (in this case, a 4). In both die types, the result is the number that is right ...


62

A good way to analyze the differences between the two distributions is to imagine a head-to-head contest between characters. First, suppose you have two identical characters, A and B, rolling off against each other with d20. They tie 5% of the time; 47.5% of the time one wins; 47.5% of the time the other wins. In contrast, if you use 3d6, ties occur 9.2% ...


58

Playing Cards You need a source of randomness, and a deck of playing cards can do it. If you need to roll a d20, shuffle the following 20 cards and draw one: Ace of Hearts (1) 2-10 of Hearts (2-10) Ace of Spades (11) 2-10 of Spades (12-20) Essentially the hearts are the face value, and the spades are face value +10. The nice thing about this method is ...


42

Whenever my players roll before they establish their actions in the fiction (my system is Dungeon World), I say something like: "Whoa whoa whoa wait a moment. What are you doing and how are you doing it? We do not even know yet whether a roll is even required for that." I then have them explain what they do and if it triggers a move (=rolling), I'll have ...


41

There is no name for the full set other than "a set of polyhedral dice." If I need to distinguish it from another set of polyhedral dice: I would say a Set of polyhedral dice suitable for playing DnD, as compared to a Set of dice for playing L5R (10d10) or a Set of dice suitable for playing Dilettante (10 d8s and 10 d4s) History The d4, d6, d8, d12, ...


41

You read one die as the 10s place and the other die as the 1s place. Traditionally, (00, 0) means 100 instead of 0. Your set is marked to make forgetting which die is which, intentionally or accidentally, impossible. 10s| 1s | Reads as 00 1 1 00 2 2 10 0 10 30 1 31 50 6 56 80 9 89 90 0 90 90 1 91 90 ...


40

First off, those little +1s and +2s are going to be much more important. Being flanked is suddenly a matter of, say, a 50% increase in their chance to hit you rather than a 10% increase. You noticed this with Aid Another, but it'll come up other places as well. Any power that forces an enemy to grant combat advantage becomes much, much more powerful. Being ...


40

The d3 is a rare die, and the d2 is a coin. Substituting a D3 can be done with any die whose total number of faces can be divided by 3. These include in your case the d6 and the d12. The easiest way to do this is to use a d6 and say the following: 1 → 1, 2 2 → 3, 4 3 → 5, 6 Or in other words, divide by 2, rounded up. You can also work in cycles, with one ...


39

Yes, a d100 is the same as 2d10 with one as the percentile. A d100 goes 1-100, a d10 goes 1-10. Neither allows you to roll a 0, because of the way you count a percentile dice. (10 on the percentile and a 6 on the other dice forms 6, 10 on one and 10 on the other is 100, no option will result in 0) Do remember to use different colors of dice, else you will ...


38

Okay, so... You want to measure values from ~0 - ~90. You want even distribution, and high granularity (i.e. as many distinct values as possible). Well, that's easy. (Ceiling(1d6 / 2) - 1) * 36 + (1d6 - 1) * 6 + (1d6 - 1) AnyDice Provides values of 0 to 107, with even probability, and each value represented exactly once. Notes: Ceiling(1d6 / 2) is ...


38

There are a few ways to replicate dice. Cards. You can divide cards up into groups to simulate various dice. A d4 can be 10,J,Q,K of one suite. A d6 can be Ace-6 of one suite. A d8 Ace-8. d10: Ace-10 D:12 A-Q D:20 A-10 of one suit (1-10), and A-10 of another suite (11-20). D100: A-10 of one suite for the 1's digit, and A-10 of another suite for the 10's ...


38

I assume you can get your hands on a small bag and a bunch of identical beads. Take 20 beads and write the numbers from 1 to 20 on them. Put them in the bag and (optionally) write "d20" on it. To simulate a d20 roll, just shake the bag and pull out a bead without looking. Then return the bead into the bag for the next "roll". This is basically how ...


37

Let's see if we can illustrate this. First thing, lets discard the notion that 3d6 and 1d18 are potentially equivalent. We know this cannot be the case as 3d6 cannot roll less than 3. So let's compare to something slightly more comparable. The result set of 3d6 has the same numbers as the roll of 1d16 + 2. Rolling a 1d16+2, we get numbers from 3 to 18 with ...


36

Hmmm, the rewording of the question makes my and other's discussion about diceless systems mostly off topic... Rather than deleting that part I'll just expand on "Approaches/schools of thought on when to not roll or ignore dice in a dice-based system." Techniques Step one is don't require rolls when they shouldn't be necessary. I've had GMs that have ...


36

I experimented with the methods proposed (except liquid white-out; couldn't find any), with the following results: Paint: I used acrylic paint to fill in the numbers and paper towel to remove the excess. Very good opacity with this method, but I could not get enough paint to stay in the numbers during the removal of the excess. I tried various drying ...


36

Average The Skills If he has to use two skills, average the two skills together and then make one roll. In this case, that'd be a single roll to get 50 or below, since he has 50 in both skills (so the average is 50). If he was better at one skill than another, it'd look slightly different. Say he has a 50 in Stonecarving and 25 in Artistry. That makes the ...


34

Any well written dice roller will give you perfect random rolls (well, pseudo-random — the difference doesn't matter for gaming). Some dice rollers are not well written, or depend on the underlying OS/language's source of random numbers, which itself can be well written or not. The vast majority of the time you will find dice rollers more random than ...


34

Before original D&D was published, but after its invention and they'd started playing it, the story I've heard is that a Dave Wesley found these odd dice in an educational supplies catalogue and thought they might be good for the game. Gary Gygax had a love of statistics and probability, and that probably had a lot to do with his quick adoption of the ...


33

I appears that bySwarm is right. Here are the results: along the X axis is the total bonus over the six ability scores. Along the Y axis, the probability, obtained from 1 million runs. Results below a total bonus of +3 have been purged from the count, so the grand total of runs is less than the original 1 million. It appears that the twelve 3d6 ...


33

There sure is! Pick a size of a pool of d20 dice. The bigger the pool, the stronger the results. Next grab a d6, d10, a different colored d20, or even a coin. Roll the die pool and roll the extra die. If you got an even number on the die, pick the smallest roll from of the pool of die and use this as a result. Odd? You pick the largest die value from the ...


33

Your solution is much simpler: The Lucky player should have a decrease of all hidden difficulties. Functionally, "lucky" is very hard to quantify. But if you want it to be a particularly subtle luck, then for any difficulty where the PC doesn't know the number (be it attack roll or a monster attacking her, or a skill check) simply give them a hidden bonus ...


31

As a fellow GM of Earthdawn, and former GM/Player of DnD 4e I have some good news and some bad news: Your player is being somewhat silly if he's actually hardcore about statistics: It's easy enough to perform a numeric analysis on Earthdawn mechanics if you really want to. There's even an article, "The Bare Bones", that RedBrick commissioned for their ...


31

If you forgive me, the odds are that this is a perception thing, not a reality thing - unless you own biased dice. The sane way to determine which is true is test, test, test: take a dice, and roll it a thousand times. Keep a tally of how many times you roll each number. That will do one of two things: Most likely, it shows that there is no substantial ...


31

Just roll a d1000 in anydice. The probabilities for rolling 3d10 as the 3 tens places will be exactly the same as rolling a d1000. These answers shows the math for d100 vs 2d10, it's exactly the same story here just times ten. The point of using d1000 is that probabilities are easy to calculate: the chance of the number or less is equal to the number in ...


31

The more dice you roll, the more the outcome focusses on the average, as the high and low rolls start evening out. While there's a reasonable chance of getting a 2 on 2d6 (1 in 36) there's no chance in hell you're getting a 240 out of 40d6 (1/6^40, vastly less than one in a trillion, I don't even know how to describe this number) The copout The easiest fix ...


30

Yes, d2, d3, d4, d6, d8, d10, d12, and d20 have uniform distributions Of these, the d4, d6, d8, d12, and d20 are regular polyhedrons. The d2 and d10 are not regular polyhedrons, but each face is nonetheless equally-likely.


29

There are plenty of alternatives to using dice. Gnome Stew has an excellent article on replacing a dice system in a survival-horror game called Dread (by Epidiah Ravachol) with a Jenga tower; every risky action requires a block pull, and the game continues until the tower -- representing the player's sanity -- falls. Sometimes the more creative alternatives ...


29

In the past I've made origami dice. There is a subfield of origami works, geometric origami, that includes the polyhedrals used for dice in D&D. There are instructions online to make a tetrahedron (d4), cube (d6), octahedron (d8), pentagonal bipyramid (d10), dodecahedron (d12) and finally an icosahedron (d20). I hope it will works for you, Happy ...



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