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121

No, It's Not You can use AnyDice to visualize dice rolls really easily and see what's going on. The links will show a table with the results for each one. Here's 3d6. Here's 1d18. Here's both on the same screen for easy comparison. Aside from the obvious issue of not being able to roll 1 on 3d6 because the minimum on each die is 1, the numbers in the ...


92

Buy some. The best "replacement" for not having Fudge dice is to buy some! Grey Ghost Press (maker of Fudge) sells a tube of four Fudge dice for about 5 bucks, or a bag of twenty Fudge dice for about 15 bucks, but a lot of places are sold out. However, Indie Press Revolution just started carrying Fudge Dice (four or twenty) to support the FATE-based games ...


62

There are two different styles of pyramid-shaped d4 dice: The purple d4 on the left is read by having the number at the bottom be the result of the roll (in this case, a 1). The light blue d4 on the right is read by having the number at the point be the result of the roll (in this case, a 4). In both die types, the result is the number that is right ...


37

Okay, so... You want to measure values from ~0 - ~90. You want even distribution, and high granularity (i.e. as many distinct values as possible). Well, that's easy. (Ceiling(1d6 / 2) - 1) * 36 + (1d6 - 1) * 6 + (1d6 - 1) AnyDice Provides values of 0 to 107, with even probability, and each value represented exactly once. Notes: Ceiling(1d6 / 2) is ...


36

First off, those little +1s and +2s are going to be much more important. Being flanked is suddenly a matter of, say, a 50% increase in their chance to hit you rather than a 10% increase. You noticed this with Aid Another, but it'll come up other places as well. Any power that forces an enemy to grant combat advantage becomes much, much more powerful. Being ...


36

A good way to analyze the differences between the two distributions is to imagine a head-to-head contest between characters. First, suppose you have two identical characters, A and B, rolling off against each other with d20. They tie 5% of the time; 47.5% of the time one wins; 47.5% of the time the other wins. In contrast, if you use 3d6, ties occur 9.2% ...


36

Let's see if we can illustrate this. First thing, lets discard the notion that 3d6 and 1d18 are potentially equivalent. We know this cannot be the case as 3d6 cannot roll less than 3. So let's compare to something slightly more comparable. The result set of 3d6 has the same numbers as the roll of 1d16 + 2. Rolling a 1d16+2, we get numbers from 3 to 18 with ...


34

I experimented with the methods proposed (except liquid white-out; couldn't find any), with the following results: Paint: I used acrylic paint to fill in the numbers and paper towel to remove the excess. Very good opacity with this method, but I could not get enough paint to stay in the numbers during the removal of the excess. I tried various drying ...


34

Before original D&D was published, but after its invention and they'd started playing it, the story I've heard is that a Dave Wesley found these odd dice in an educational supplies catalogue and thought they might be good for the game. Gary Gygax had a love of statistics and probability, and that probably had a lot to do with his quick adoption of the ...


34

Yes, a d100 is the same as 2d10 with one as the percentile. A d100 goes 1-100, a d10 goes 1-10. Neither allows you to roll a 0, because of the way you count a percentile dice. (10 on the percentile and a 6 on the other dice forms 6, 10 on one and 10 on the other is 100, no option will result in 0) Do remember to use different colors of dice, else you will ...


33

Your solution is much simpler: The Lucky player should have a decrease of all hidden difficulties. Functionally, "lucky" is very hard to quantify. But if you want it to be a particularly subtle luck, then for any difficulty where the PC doesn't know the number (be it attack roll or a monster attacking her, or a skill check) simply give them a hidden bonus ...


30

Hmmm, the rewording of the question makes my and other's discussion about diceless systems mostly off topic... Rather than deleting that part I'll just expand on "Approaches/schools of thought on when to not roll or ignore dice in a dice-based system." Techniques Step one is don't require rolls when they shouldn't be necessary. I've had GMs that have ...


29

There are plenty of alternatives to using dice. Gnome Stew has an excellent article on replacing a dice system in a survival-horror game called Dread (by Epidiah Ravachol) with a Jenga tower; every risky action requires a block pull, and the game continues until the tower -- representing the player's sanity -- falls. Sometimes the more creative alternatives ...


27

There sure is! Pick a size of a pool of d20 dice. The bigger the pool, the stronger the results. Next grab a d6, d10, a different colored d20, or even a coin. Roll the die pool and roll the extra die. If you got an even number on the die, pick the smallest roll from of the pool of die and use this as a result. Odd? You pick the largest die value from the ...


26

If you forgive me, the odds are that this is a perception thing, not a reality thing - unless you own biased dice. The sane way to determine which is true is test, test, test: take a dice, and roll it a thousand times. Keep a tally of how many times you roll each number. That will do one of two things: Most likely, it shows that there is no substantial ...


25

No. Unfortunately, superstitions about dice do not actually impact probability. However, a die can be unbalanced and thereby generate uneven results. What your friend is experiencing is confirmation bias, wherein he is looking for bad rolls, and finds them, and then looks for good rolls and finds them. In order to falsify the claim of "exhausting bad ...


23

According to Wikipedia, this is called zero bias notation, and you simply use a "z" instead of a "d". I.e., your example would be written as 3z8. The only reference provided for this is an RPG.Net post. I've never seen any signs that the notation caught on anywhere, but I do like it as a system.


23

Any well written dice roller will give you perfect random rolls (well pseudo-random - the difference doesn't matter for gaming). Some dice rollers are not well written, or depend on the underlying OS/language's source of random numbers, which itself can be well written or not. The vast majority of the time you will find dice rollers more random then actual ...


22

I'l go against the grain here… Don't ever fudge rolls or help the player. It will rob them of their agency, and it will probably piss off other players. Besides, not having risks and consequences will make them into careless players at best or actually turn them into murderous cretins. Changing the system may help with the probabilities of having to deal ...


22

D100 and d%+d10 have exactly the same probabilities. If all 3 dice involved are fair, then they should come up with very similar distributions when rolled repeatedly. Obviously this isn't always the case as dice aren't consistent and there is a lot of randomness unless you roll a lot of times. It seems there might be some confusion as to why d% doesn't have ...


20

"Natural" means an unmodified roll. The number you see printed on the die when you just throw it. Not adding or subtracting bonuses, penalties or rerolling. Just the number you see. Terms will differ in individual games and groups, but usually the total result (natural roll plus any modifiers) is just called your "roll," or we'll say "I got a 25." In some ...


18

If I had to design a notation from scratch, I wouldn't use the zero bias notation (3z8) at all. The "z" is a little arcane for my tastes. I'd prefix the die size with a zero: 3d08. ETA: But, you know, 3d8-3 also works. Geeky stuff, in case you're looking to write a dice roller or something: For more power, use a range operator: 3d[0-7]. For even more ...


18

As a fellow GM of Earthdawn, and former GM/Player of DnD 4e I have some good news and some bad news: Your player is being somewhat silly if he's actually hardcore about statistics: It's easy enough to perform a numeric analysis on Earthdawn mechanics if you really want to. There's even an article that RedBrick wrote on their website. The guy uses basic ...


18

No There exist systems in which there is no “event” on a natural-1. It’s by no means a necessary component of an RPG. And this is ignoring the existence of trivial answers like RPGs that don’t use dice, or don’t use any kind of randomization at all. Those may not even have a meaningful definition of “fumble.” ...


17

You have two basic choices for how to have your players roll their dice: Ask them to make their rolls in secret, and trust the results they tell you. Ask them to roll their dice in the open, so that there's no question they're telling the truth. If you take the first option you must trust your players and accept what they tell you! You need to be able ...


16

Without any prior knowledge of any such system existing anywhere, I'll just share my thoughts on a system that may be good for getting the dice off the play. I have not tested this but it may be fun to try. Bargain for success This system uses a currency of some sort(call it karma, chi, clout, mojo, energy, mana etc. Whatever fits your campaign world. I'll ...


16

Fudge dice are good for generating a nice bell curve centered on zero. Each die is six-sided, with two minus (–), two blank ( ), and two plus (+) sides, which correspond to -1, 0, and +1 respectively. You roll them and then add up the pluses and minuses to get your result. For example, 4dF will get you a result from -4 to +4 with a mode of 0 and a narrow ...


16

My personal recommendation is to use a dice roller. If you have an iPhone, I recommend Dicenomicon ($5), dynamicDICE ($1) or Dice Bag (free). I have heard that Pip ($1) is also pretty good. I have found that the luck associated with physically rolling dice is dissociated from digitally rolling them. If you find that you still think that a dice roller is ...


15

Short answer: there's no real difference between the two types. The type of dice you're calling crystal are also known as rolling-pin or rolling-log style dice. They're actually just n-sided prisms with the ends tapered so they never land on them. Rolling a prism die like this is just as fair as any other die. To see why, take a look at a picture of a ...


15

Yes, it's true that each combination of dice rolls are equally probable, but the distribution is based on the sum. And in that, there are multiple combinations that will produce the same sum: 1+1+1 = 3 <--- only one combination 1+1+2 = 4 1+2+1 = 4 <--- three combinations: 4 is 3x more likely than 3 2+1+1 = 4 By contrast, rolling 1d18 means each ...



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