New answers tagged

3

The problem with this question is the fact that there simply is no standard. Some DM's make all their rolls in secret and just announce the results. Sometimes it's for suspense, sometimes it's to 'fudge' the rolls a little. It's terrible disappointing, on both sides of the table, if the characters are taken out right at the start of the session just because ...


11

To begin I want to cover the idea of fudging a roll. It may be considered controversial and all to many people, but it's both advised and explained in the DMG pg 18: DM CHEATING AND PLAYER PERCEPTIONS Terrible things can happen in the game because the dice just go awry. Everything might be going fine, when suddenly the players have a run of bad luck. A ...


21

Some of the games tagged on your question do specify in their rules, adventures and supplements that certain rolls can or should be made in secret. However, in practice, whether any given roll is made secretly or openly is a matter of playstyle choice and varies from table to table. There are a number of reasons to keep the results of rolls secret. The ...


7

No* I have not read that the DM ought to hide all die rolls in D&D 3.0e and 3.5e. This comes from reading the SRDs, the player's guide, and the DM's guide (albeit not recently). There are some spells or mechanics which do require a "secret" roll, such as reputation, disguise checks, and some spells. However, there is strong evidence that all the rolls ...


-2

The simple answer: either everything (x)or rolling dice becomes a torture, but results are like the original (if you hack dice and use some coins.) The more detailed answer: After a crash course through the die system (I barely got all the details, but enough to get the most basics), I had to observe, that it heavily relies on the different dice being used ...


0

No. You can recognize this from the first cell, which should be 0.9 (results of 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0 are all 1 success, 1 is 0 successes and is also a botch). $$ \frac{9 \times 1 + 1 \times 0}{9+ 1} = \frac{9 + 0}{10} = 0.9 $$ Per clarification in the comments, you are looking specifically at V20 (Onyx Path's 20th anniversary edition of Vampire: The ...


0

Here is a good way to intuitively understand your odds at this... With one d10 there is a 90% chance of failure, that is, NOT rolling a 1. With two dice there is a 90% chance of 90% chance of failure. That is .9 x .9 = .81 = 81% you will not roll a 1. With three dice there is a 90% chance of 90% chance of 90% chance of failure. That is .9 x .9 x .9 = ....


5

There's another way of looking at this, which works particularly well with a ten-sided die. Think of the single-digit numbers from 0-9. How many of them have a 1? One, out of ten, or 10%. Now, out of all of the combinations of two digits, from 00-99, how many have any 1s? Well, there's 01, plus all ten of the numbers from 10-19, and then 21, 31, 41, 51, 61,...


2

Whenever you have an probability experiment where there are exactly two outcomes and you can assign a probably to the one of the outcomes, it's called a binomial experiment: True, false, yes, no, black, white, etc. In this case, you get a one or you don't. The number of dice would constitute the number of trials, since it wouldn't matter if you rolled a ...



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