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3

There is now an official table and rules for adjusting weapon damage across the whole scale. Those are available in the Paizo FAQ. (Announced just a few weeks ago on the Paizo boards.)


2

Let's assume that we are simply trying to maximize the expected value of our roll. (As discussed this might not be a realistic representation of actual gameplay, but we can work it out anyway.) Then the rolls on any of the dice don't affect our decisions to reroll for other dice - that is, any one die's rolls and strategy is independent of other dice and we ...


9

This cannot be nicely modeled purely as probability The issue with this system is that it's not purely a matter of randomness, it's (as you seem to be presenting it) a matter of both randomness and decision-making. A dice rolling program can model the randomness, but not the decision-making (at least, not in a manner that is of much use). Basically, using ...


-1

You can also use Everclear or high quality vodka... which has the added benefit of being consumable when your dice are clean.


4

In their FAQ, Sharpie recommends using Amodex ink & stain remover to remove their markers.


2

Before you roll, designate which of your two dice will represent the tens digit, and which die will represent the ones digit. This is easiest if the dice are visually distinct: two different colors, or one solid-color and one metallic, or different sizes or shapes, or whatever. But if you have some other way to keep track of which die is which, that will ...


3

So is it then true that on the first d10, the 0 counts as zero, but on the second d10, the 0 counts as ten? That is a mathematically coherent way to do it, but most people just read it as a two-digit number, then translate 00 to 100. This also adds a bit of dramatic tension when rolling sequentially - if you roll a 0 first, then you're probably going to ...


18

Add face values: X|00|10|20|30|40|50|60|70|80|90| -------------------------------- 0|00|10|20|30|40|50|60|70|80|90| 1|01|11|21|31|41|51|61|71|81|91| 2|02|12|22|32|42|52|62|72|82|92| 3|03|13|23|33|43|53|63|73|83|93| 4|04|14|24|34|44|54|64|74|84|94| 5|05|15|25|35|45|55|65|75|85|95| 6|06|16|26|36|46|56|66|76|86|96| 7|07|17|27|37|47|57|67|77|87|97| ...


9

Starting from scratch: Percentile dice (d%) is meant to get you a number between 1-100. The "classic" way of getting this number is with two d10s, one designated as your "tens digit", the other as your "ones digit". (Some sets will give you a tens-digit dice that's actually labelled that way: instead of 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0 it'll have ...


5

There is no single right way. The important point is that everybody knows how you do it before you roll. It might also be nicer, if everybody in the group rolls the same way, but it's not something to get into a fight over. I prefer just adding the tens and ones, and 00+0 is 100. Arguably, it's also nicer when all zeros is the special number 100, instead of ...


40

You read one die as the 10s place and the other die as the 1s place. Traditionally, (00, 0) means 100 instead of 0. Your set is marked to make forgetting which die is which, intentionally or accidentally, impossible. 10s| 1s | Reads as 00 1 1 00 2 2 10 0 10 30 1 31 50 6 56 80 9 89 90 0 90 90 1 91 90 ...


14

output 3d{-1,1,1,1,1,2} named "fiveSixths" Your mechanic returns 1 success exactly 5/6ths of the time. But it's a lumpy bi-modal distribution on 1 and 3.5 total successes. Make sure to provide free aspirin to players, as calculating results will be entailed.


2

Yes, it is perfectly acceptable and possible to make a d3 from a d6. If the desired dice is a divisor of the actual dice, you can apply the modulo function to it to get the desired dice. For example, rolling a d6 % 3 will give you a d3. Roll a 1: 1 % 3 = 1 -- thats a 1. Roll a 2: 2 % 3 = 2 -- thats a 2. Roll a 3: 3 % 3 = 0 -- thats a 3. Just bear with me ...


1

Your intuition is correct - you can use a d6 to simulate a d3 or d2 by assigning the sides of the d6 to the numbers 1 and 2, or 1, 2 and 3. If you find yourself needing a d2 or d3 a lot, and don't feel 100% comfortable with making the substitution, you can simply take a d6 and repaint its sides. For example, paint the 6 to show 1, the 5 to show 2, and the 4 ...


6

Substituting by multiplication and division is easy. What you can't do is substitute by adding and subtracting. Others have gone into the basic explanation here. You can also do it with exponentiation and roots, but if give each die its own meaning. For this to work, the number of sides on the large die has to be a power of the number of sides on the small ...


1

You can absolutely do that. Cut the value in half (round up) or take the value mod 3 and add one. There is another option, however. In this case, it's odious, but it can be a useful tool: you can always simulate a small die with a larger die. If, for example, you found yourself in need of a d3, rolling a d4 and rerolling 4s will do fine. Rerolling can be a ...


9

Yes you can by choosing a die that is multiple of the one your are trying to simulate and then divide, as explained by some of the others. If you don't want to perform any calculations, you can also use any die with more sides than the one your are trying to simulate, and reroll when you roll higher than the die you are trying to simulate. So, you can use ...


10

Yes, you can and are intended to do that, division has no other effect on the probability distribution. You can use any other die with sides divisible by your target die size (so you can use a d6 both as a d3 and d2 safely, for example).


34

The d3 is a rare die, and the d2 is a coin. Substituting a D3 can be done with any die whose total number of faces can be divided by 3. These include in your case the d6 and the d12. The easiest way to do this is to use a d6 and say the following: 1 → 1, 2 2 → 3, 4 3 → 5, 6 Or in other words, divide by 2, rounded up. You can also work in cycles, with one ...


4

There is no such thing as a d3 or a d2, except for very specialised dice. What you're supposed to do with these dice is take a d4 or d6, and use half the result of each side, rounding up. (Or for a d2, just flip a coin.) It is the same with a d5, substituting a d10.


3

I recommend using the Dice Roller here: http://catchyourhare.com/diceroller/ It allows you to share a password, and then roll and manipulate dice on a virtual tabletop. This works really well for Dogs, because you all roll your piles of dice (each player using a different color) and then they can move them around as they are used in the conflict, and ...


0

For financial reasons, I don't really have access to dice, and taking the time to make the kinds of dice otherwise advocated here would be fairly prohibitive to me. As a result, except when one of the other participants brings dice which we share, I use the following method when GMing: 1) Think of a random (or pseudorandom) number between the size of your ...


7

I wanted to put that as a comment, but I believe it would be a better answer and help the asker in a way beyond question's scope. While it's admirable effort to develop a dice rolling application usable in ALL systems, its impossible to predict all required rolling schemes. Ever heard of One Roll Engine or exploding dice? Notable modern rolling engines no ...


1

This essay specifically looks at how dice are used in RPGs and how to calculate probabilities for them. It might be more helpful than some other resources because it is written with a focus on RPGs. This playlist on YouTube has some good video tutorials on probability theory. If you want to really dive into probability, you could also download this 520 ...


7

There have been hundreds of books written on this topic, and there's even a whole branch of mathematics called Probability that studies this in detail. This following link discusses the theorems behind it very clearly, written in formal mathematical language: http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Dice.html



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