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0

Since you tagged this with anydice, here's a simple AnyDice function to calculate this: function: SUB:s in SEQ:s { loop N over SUB { if (N = SUB) > (N = SEQ) { result: 0 } } result: 1 } output [{1,2,3} in 4d6] named "1,2,3 in 4d6" output [{1,2,2} in 4d6] named "1,2,2 in 4d6" output [{3,4} in 2d6] named "3,4 in 2d6" output [{3,4} in 3d6] named ...


4

The dice I always seem to be short on are d4s. For healing potions and magic missiles, mostly. Two d20s is essential, for rolling with advantage. But seriously folks, there's no such thing as "too many dice" :-)


4

Yes You should bring extra dice to any roleplaying event. In large numbers. There are many situations where you need more dice and they are for the most part independent of the actual system you are playing: Maybe 5 enemies attack. All with the same stats. Roll 5 dice. Maybe all 5 hit and the character needs to dodge 5 times. Roll 5 dice. Maybe someone ...


3

In my experience (I have a 5th level Ranger/Rogue in my current group), and if getting more dice isn't a hassle, I would for sure bring 2 D20(for when you need advantage or disadvantage), 1D12, 1D10, 1D8, 1D6, 1D4 for each player. Additionally I would look at each player to see what their most common attack is. For my ranger I use a short bow, with ...


15

Critical Hits When you score a critical hit (roll a natural 20 on the attack roll), you roll double damage. Therefore, you'll probably want to bring a second weapon die, depending on what weapon you'll be using. Greatswords and mauls are a 2d6 weapon, so you may want four d6s if you plan to use one of those. Half-orcs and barbarians each have a feature ...


3

This really depends on the level of the characters, if starting with level 1's then the basic 7 dice set, or pair of each is more than enough to cover you for a while. At level 5 you get access to extra attacks and to level 3 spells. There might be a need to add additional dice, lightning bolt/fireball damage starts off at 8d6. Having multiple dice is ...


12

This experiment can show that a die has an extremely imbalanced center of mass if the same number always shows up no matter how you agitate the die, but it can fail to reveal a less extreme imbalance that still causes a bias. (Also note that the center of mass is not the only thing affecting the outcome of rolling a die on a surface -- asymmetry in the die's ...


0

rolling a 1,2,3 out of 4d6 You want 3 particular values (it does not matter what they are) on 4 dice: you need 3 dice to carry those values - the other one doesn't matter. Imagine lining the dice up in order - 3 are set ((3x2x1)=5 in 216 chance) and the other dice can be in any of the 4 positions so (4x5)=20 in 216 or 5 in 54. getting a 3 and a 4 on 2d6 vs ...


2

Improving on Brian's answer; if you are going to compare multiple rolls, you can assign your "special die" to a variable and reuse it over and over again. Also, there are four 1 results in there so there's a shortcut for writing that as well. W: {-1, 1:4, 2} output 2dW named "Skill 2" output 3dW named "Skill 3" output 4dW named "Skill 4" And that's one ...


2

Answered by Jasper Flick, the creator of AnyDice: http://anydice.com/program/6268 Here is the code function: check A:n vs B:n { if A < B - 3 { result: -2 } \ CF \ if A < B { result: -1 } \ F \ if A > B + 3 { result: 2 } \ CS \ if A > B { result: 1 } \ S \ result: 0 \ DR \ } SD: d{-1, 0:2, 1:2, 2} loop A over {1..15} { A_POOL: AdSD loop ...


5

There is plenty of rolling here, that's for sure. Exploding 6s are fairly common, what concerns me is 1s. Having a punishing mechanic like this would make sense if there was an element of risk-taking: if players could choose to roll extra dice but risk them negating the successes they already have. As it stands, rolling a 1 simply negates a success, meaning ...


0

Hamate meets most of your requirements, if in a roundabout way. A dice log can be opened per-player or I believe for a campaign, with registered users being able to roll in the log and keep records. Unregistered users cannot access the dice logs but can make individual rolls with verification numbers a GM can use to make sure the rolls are legitimate. ...



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