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0

I would suggest perhaps having one roll per skill, but make note of the amount by which the roll either exceeds or falls short of the requirement. Tally up the first five points above what was required, and half of all points beyond, for each roll that exceeded requirements; then tally up the first five points below what was required and double all points ...


0

Point Buy Your system is not bad, but it still allows for a good bit of inconsistency. A poor rolling monk could still have lower stats than a lucky Wizard. Plus, most of the top-tier classes only need one good stat to be workable. The lower-tier ones need a few high scores. A point buy system is a nice solution. Tier I: 20 pts on the standard D&D ...


4

Just Apply Penalties/Bonuses To The Roll The problem with what you're trying to do with multiple rolling methods is that it's very complicated to actually get the outcome exactly how you want it. Each one results in different odds and distributions, and tweaking them all to get the right amount of gap for each one is going to be complex and time consuming. ...


3

The simplest way to do this would be to add the two skills together (50+50 = 100) and then compared that to a roll of a larger die (1d200). This maintains the 50% chance, despite making it a rounded curve instead of a flat curve. It also allows for character with different skill levels to perform something difficult and maintains simplicity. A character with ...


3

What does success mean to you? I think the most important question here is how you are defining success. Jack wants to carve an artistic statue, so you need to figure out what successfully doing that means. I think that you're original idea of rolling a d100 for each skill check would work just fine. The only change I would make is in how you are looking at ...


0

Roll one d100. If it's above the stonecarving skill, the block is functional. If it's above the artistry skill, the stone is pretty.


9

If you have a task that requires more skill, you would expect less success rate. Roll twice, first roll decides if the statue looks like what it's meant to, second roll determines if it falls apart. If rolling two dice is interfering with fun by bogging things down, just roll once against the lowest skill. Using max or average is likely to lead to some ...


21

You don't. You just roll one d100. As you understand, rolling multiple dice is a useful tool for achieving different result spreads. But rolling multiple dice is a tool with a time and place for when you want various advantages: you can take highest or lowest, you can create a bell curve effect, or do other interesting things. However, you're not ...


5

In the same way that 2 d10s can replicate a d100 if you use decimal positioning, you could use a d2 (i.e. "coin") and a d100. d2-1 gives you the 100s place, d100 gives you the next two digits. Voilà: a deeply dissatisfying but perfectly uniform generator of numbers from 1 to 200. You can generalize this approach to generate uniform distributions with any ...


35

Average The Skills If he has to use two skills, average the two skills together and then make one roll. In this case, that'd be a single roll to get 50 or below, since he has 50 in both skills (so the average is 50). If he was better at one skill than another, it'd look slightly different. Say he has a 50 in Stonecarving and 25 in Artistry. That makes the ...


7

Let's discuss all of the "ingredients" separately, and then add them: The base odds for rolling any given number on a d6 are 1/6. The base odds for rolling a 5 or 6 on a d6 are 1/3 = 0.33 (2 out of 6 making 2/6 = 1/3). Similarly, the odds for rolling 1-4 on a d6 are 2/3 = 0.67. The odds for a successful "single-shot" explosion are 1/6 x 1/3 = 1/18 = 0.06. ...


1

The odds of getting 3 of the same result out of four are 33%. For each set of Four Fudge dice there are a total of 27 different roll results with 3 alternate outcomes per set of rolls, +, -, and o. For a total of 81 possible results. Those outcomes are below: ++++ ++-+ ++o+ +++- ++-- ++o- +++o ++-o ++oo +-++ +--+ +-o+ +-+- +--- +-o- +-+o +--o +-oo +o++ ...


7

There are 81 possible permutations of this roll. Of these, 3 have all 4 results the same, and 24 have 3 results the same. This gives us a probability of 27/81 or 33.33%, for at least 3 results the same, and 24/81 or 29.63% for exactly 3 results the same.


2

The probability of 3 of any one result is 33.33%. Here's why: The basic probability of getting at least 3 of any one outcome of fudge dice is 11.11%. This is 1/9. The fact that you have 3 possibile results from a set where the outcome of any 3 dice is 11% means that the overall probability is 33.33%. Showing my work. This program utilizes the fact that ...


7

That's fine. Everything you described is exactly equivalent: Rolling one d10 five times and recording the results as you go. Rolling two to four d10, then rerolling whichever you need in order to get the remaining results. Rolling five d10 all at once. All of them result, overall, in five dice rolls being made, and five results being recorded. There is ...


3

Unless you're talking about a specific implementation of Fate such as the Dresden Files RPG, the Fate ruleset doesn't disallow anything! If it's good for your game, they want you to do it, and questions of "is it against the rules" don't make sense in the context of Fate customisation. That said, there is precedent for this: In the Atomic Robo RPG (which is ...


5

In many cases, for published adventures and challenges, D&D will use multiple DCs. This is especially common for knowledge or perception checks. For example, with a DC 10 knowledge check you might know that trolls regenerate damage; with a DC 15 you might know that fire prevents said regeneration. When designing challenges as a GM, you could extend ...


5

Fail Forward Actually, there is support baked right into the 5e cake for part of what you're asking. From p. 58 of the Basic Rules (emphasis mine): If the total equals or exceeds the DC, the ability check is a success—the creature overcomes the challenge at hand. Otherwise, it’s a failure, which means the character or monster makes no progress ...


-1

There isn't a solution for this native to 5e. At least not yet. This is the kind of thing that might see publication in the DMG or a latter book in the series, however that's no kind of guarantee. As you said, you could homebrew this. It's actually fairly easy to handle from a narrative perspective, and in a few instances D&D provides a bit of ...


-1

One answer may be to not have every action decided by a roll. "I try to unlock the chest." "Okay, it's a basic lock and you just jemmy it with a knife." or "I climb the nearest big tree" "The tree has lots of branches; it's not a problem for someone that's been exploring dungeons for four years" or "Do I think he's lying?" "Yeah; he's awful at it and ...


0

Hand them the dice. This has worked in small tables, especially for games that don't use lots of different dice. Whether you give them the dice in person or they are kept on a bowl in the middle of the table, have touching the dice be a part of the ritual. You may also want to reinforce their behavior with treats when they wait for your input to get the ...


2

Crazy idea: Try it the other way. Have them roll a dozen dice at the start of play... Those are their rolls. They can line those rolls up however they want, but they don't get new ones until they've used ALL of the old ones. I had this used on a character of mine as a result of consulting an oracle. Don't know if I liked it or not, but it certainly was ...


2

Choosing an action after you already know the result is a form of cheating. Any of the GMs I gamed with back in my college days would have simply declared the roll to be some sort of saving throw. (such as vs. DEX to see if you tripped over a root, or whatever was appropriate to the setting). Players got the hint real quick when their impatience caused them ...


9

Train them, or it will lead to bad habits Establishing a clear statement that you always use before a player rolls helps, I find. Saying "Roll them" (or ringing a small bell) before every roll is a bit tedious but it helps form a habit, so if the words haven't been said they know. If they roll before the cue then simply ignore the roll completely, don't ...


41

Whenever my players roll before they establish their actions in the fiction (my system is Dungeon World), I say something like: "Whoa whoa whoa wait a moment. What are you doing and how are you doing it? We do not even know yet whether a roll is even required for that." I then have them explain what they do and if it triggers a move (=rolling), I'll have ...



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