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5

Multiple dice give you a discrete, "blocky" distribution similar to normal when they are added together. This occurs because there are more combinations that sum to results in the average range and fewer combinations as you approach the high and low end of the possible results. For example, with 2 6-sided dice, there is only one combination that produces 2, ...


30

Just roll a d1000 in anydice. The probabilities for rolling 3d10 as the 3 tens places will be exactly the same as rolling a d1000. These answers shows the math for d100 vs 2d10, it's exactly the same story here just times ten. The point of using d1000 is that probabilities are easy to calculate: the chance of the number or less is equal to the number in ...


1

I ended up getting a tweet from the creator of AnyDice with an optimized solution. The function names are clear and it works quickly. @catlikecoding Hey Jasper, could you help me with an #AnyDice question? I'm still learning the ropes with the system. http://t.co/H0qMhIaIGD— Taylor Wright (@redlamp) June 6, 2014 @redlamp Don't use a ...


1

Aside from the mathematical reasons, using different types of dice allows for things such as rolling to hit and damage simultaneously rather than sequentially - most groups, in my experience, find it faster to throw a d20 and a d8 on the table at the same time than to roll the d20, decide if it's a hit, and only then roll the d8. About a year ago, some ...


6

There's quite a few reason why many different kind of dice can be desirable, I'll concentrate on the mathematical reasons. First off, in games like D&D most of the different dice are used to calculate damage. A greataxe deals a base 1d12 of damage while a dagger deals 1d4. Using different dice to model those different weapons is much easier than using a ...


14

To make life easier. Yes, you could reproduce every other probability curve - to within 1% accuracy, which is good enough for gaming - by rolling two ten-sided dice and taking a percentage, then looking up a conversion table for the outcome. But which is easier and more natural... Roll two ten-sided dice in different colours. Convert them into a ...


2

Not all modern die rolling systems directly translate to an exact percentage chance. For instance, any open-ended or exploding die system can generate an infinitely-large result a small percentage of the time. Or, systems that use a degree of success system.


11

Short answer: Yes, your hunch is right: because probability curves, and easy access to them. Sure, you could calculate (for example by using AnyDice) in advance the percentage chances of rolling a 2, a 3, a 4 etc on a 3d6, but mapping and rolling everything so would get messy and totally inconvenient practically in an instant. You want predictably varying ...



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