New answers tagged

1

I think there's some useful new info regarding Earthdawn across versions. In particular, it seems like they've changed the "d20" jump at step 14 between editions. Some good AnyDice stats cribbed from here, comparing 1e and 4e. Note the more "normal" distributions on the second graph? As a player back in 1e, that abnormal curve always really got to me ...


-2

Try magnetic dice, available on Etsy, rolled on a steel tabletop.


3

One way I can see to roll actual dice (carefully) would be to use a magnetic plate (alternating north and south pole domains, like flexible magnet tape) and steel dice. As long as you roll gently enough the dice don't bounce too high, you'll get an honest roll and the dice will stick to the plate. Another method would be to use a ball bubbler mechanism, ...


10

You use computers instead of dice. Computers have pretty good pseudo-random number generators these days (assuming you're not using them for cryptographic purposes). I count at least a dozen free dice apps on the Android app store; I'd imagine there are at least a dozen on the Apple app store as well. It's also not very hard to write your own (less than 100 ...


1

I would use a tool for playing online. I'm sure there are some available, but I wrote my own. It was a basic chat client that allowed private messages to the DM / group, and dice rolls - including players/DM rolling hidden dice that only the DM can see. Players like to roll their dice even if they can't see the result. So we used the app and everyone can ...


10

If a game asks you to roll a ten-sided die, you treat the "0" face as "10." This gives you the value range you'd expect: 1 - 10, matching the other dice. This is extremely common. Usually if a game wants you to treat that face as a zero result, the game will call it out explicitly. There are a couple reasons for this. One is simply cosmetic. With nine ...


36

There are 10-sided dice numbered 1-10. You should be able to find some easily if you search. But it's extremely common, especially among wargamers, to use 0-9. There's a simple reason for this: Percentages. Many systems use a percentile chance of something happening. By rolling two dice labelled 0-9, in different colours with one die chosen as the tens ...


6

Ten-sided dice, often sold in pairs (the two are different colors), are most commonly used to roll percentile values -- that is, the two dice are rolled together, and the result read by multiplying one previously designated die as ten times its reading, and adding the other's reading. This gives a result from 00 to 99. Because of this, most 10-sided dice ...


3

Most d10s (as that die is usually called in English) count the way the actual decimal system does, starting at 0. You can think of 0 as being 10 if you like; it's basically the same thing. The only time this gets very complicated is if you need to roll 2 d10s as a d100 (percentile) die. But as long as you maintain a consistent system, you're fine. (Counting ...



Top 50 recent answers are included