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10

Technically, Yes In the section Nonlethal Damage in the subsection Healing Nonlethal Damage the Player's Handbook says You heal nonlethal damage at the rate of 1 hit point per hour per character level. For example, a 7th-level wizard heals 7 points of nonlethal damage each hour until all the nonlethal damage is gone. (146) A forced march requires a ...


8

Extensively use Tome of Battle strikes. The strikes sometimes involve multiple attacks, but often involve a single attack with greatly enhanced properties. This can help greatly. But note that even high-level initiators often still use regular full-attacks: you simply cannot easily replicate the reliability and sheer damage of a full-attack with a single ...


6

The problem you're running into here, is that the rules are ambiguous: The square you start out in is not considered threatened by any opponent you can see, and therefore visible enemies do not get attacks of opportunity against you when you move from that square. These rules are written for medium creatures, and don't make a lot of sense when applied ...


2

Roll Once This increases swinginess but not the average output. Simply roll the d20 once for an entire attack routine and apply the different bonuses to it. This reduces time to resolution dramatically. For example, a fighter with +12/+7/+2, roll d20 and get a 10 - you hit ACs 22, 17, 12. Works fine for claw/claw/bite and any other kind of combo. What ...


2

While you could march virtually forever, it would be a slow, crippling walk after two failed Constitution checks. While preventing the nonlethal damage from a forced march also prevents fatigue, taking the damage then healing it away is different, and does not remove the fatigue effect - removing fatigue requires 8 hours of rest. The second failed ...


2

Only very small issues–hit points and hardness should be okay. The relative scale of hit points (that is, how many hit points represent a given amount of damage) is pretty much unchanged from 3.5 to 5e, so in terms of the raw hit points of materials, those should be pretty accurate. In addition, the damage output of characters, at least at low levels, has ...


1

It is relatively trivial to make a spreadsheet calculate average damage for iterative attacks. So long as you know all the variables, reducing attacks vs AC x to an average damage means that you can roll the highest attacks, because they're fun, and then for the subsidiary attacks, to simply apply the average damage. The player should create a lookup table ...



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