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17

Technically, Yes In the section Nonlethal Damage in the subsection Healing Nonlethal Damage the Player's Handbook says You heal nonlethal damage at the rate of 1 hit point per hour per character level. For example, a 7th-level wizard heals 7 points of nonlethal damage each hour until all the nonlethal damage is gone. (146) A forced march requires a ...


11

Extensively use Tome of Battle strikes. The strikes sometimes involve multiple attacks, but often involve a single attack with greatly enhanced properties. This can help greatly. But note that even high-level initiators often still use regular full-attacks: you simply cannot easily replicate the reliability and sheer damage of a full-attack with a single ...


11

You only need the Pathfinder Core Rulebook to run a game. The GMG is not the equivalent of the old DMGs; the core rulebook is basically PHB+DMG. The GMG has help, additional rules, advice, NPCs, etc. You do not need the 3.5e DMG either. You can see a lot of the content (specifically the rules content) of both the CRB and the GMG on the PRD site to compare ...


8

Light Weapons that the rogue has proficiency in These are really the only significant concerns. You need a light weapon for Weapon Finesse and/or Two-Weapon Fighting, and you need too many feats to burn one on proficiency in something fancy. You could go with a rapier in one hand and a light weapon in the other, if you wanted, but if you have any feats or ...


7

The problem you're running into here, is that the rules are ambiguous: The square you start out in is not considered threatened by any opponent you can see, and therefore visible enemies do not get attacks of opportunity against you when you move from that square. These rules are written for medium creatures, and don't make a lot of sense when applied ...


7

Because they are different. Note, the water described in a marsh terrain is a "deep bog". The water described in aquatic terrain is just water. The environments are intended to be different and thus have different rules. The rules are not "complimentary" or additive. Total cover for being underwater is somewhat of an oversimplification of refraction and ...


7

Try the Gnome Battlepick, an exotic weapon from the Arms and Equipment Guide. 1d6 damage, 4x crit. The Arms and Equipment Guide being a 3.0 book, it is listed as a "small" weapon.


6

Enjoy the absurdly-named exotic weapon, the Dragonsplit Appearing the Monster Manual IV in the Greenspawn Sneak entry, the dragonsplit can be used as a piercing weapon like a short sword. Alternative grips use its long edge for slashing attacks or its short edge for chopping and hacking. It counts as a light weapon for the purpose of Two-Weapon ...


6

Yes, You Need All Of Those The Rules Compendium is a collection of rules. It doesn't have class information (PHB), Magic Items, Prestige Classes, or world building stuff (DMG), and has no monster stats (MM). You can replace those with the SRD if you feel like it, but some source of that stuff is required. So What's It Good For? It's handy if you are ...


5

Blood Magic I had a quick look for blood magic compatible with 3.5e, and I found, well, a lot of stuff. People seem to like this concept a lot. However, there isn't really a lot of it that seems any good, though. I'll summarize what i've been able to find, and then give some suggestions. 3.5e Material (Non-Homebrew) Spell Thematics - From Player's ...


5

Only very small issues–hit points and hardness should be okay. The relative scale of hit points (that is, how many hit points represent a given amount of damage) is essentially static from 3.5 to 5e, so in terms the raw hit points of materials should be unchanged. In addition, the damage output of characters, at low levels at least, is about the same in 3.5 ...


5

While you could march virtually forever, it would be a slow, crippling walk after two failed Constitution checks. While preventing the nonlethal damage from a forced march also prevents fatigue, taking the damage then healing it away is different, and does not remove the fatigue effect - removing fatigue requires 8 hours of rest. The second failed ...


5

Pathfinder does not follow the three-book PHB/DMG/MM tradition that D&D does. Although PF's Bestiary series serves the same purpose as D&D's Monster Manuals, PF's Core Rulebook is more like a combination of D&D's PHB and DMG, as opposed to being analogous to the PHB alone. You can certainly use the fluff from 3.5e's DMG if you wish. You can even ...


4

Our group has been playing in the Planescape setting for years now using the 3.5 edition rules and we haven’t had any real problems with using the 3.5 edition rules in the Planescape setting. For converting monsters (and other rules although we rarely had to use that) to 3.5 edition you can use the Planewalker site. The effect of the planes on magic and ...


4

Is it Light? Light weapons qualify for Weapon Finesse. As a Rogue, you will often have lots of DEX and not lots of STR. Weapon Finesse is thus really nice to let that DEX help you hit things. Short swords qualify, which is one reason they're nice Rogue weapons. Light weapons also make Two Weapon Fighting easier, and you want to do that to maximize your ...


4

Core: Light Pick The light pick is a 1d4 damage, 20 crit, ×4 multiplier light martial weapon. Weighs 3 lbs, costs 4 gp. 4d4 averages only 10 damage, but if you have, say, 14 Strength that’s 4d4+8 for 18, plus your Sneak Attack damage whatever it is, for a pretty nasty Fort save. Not much is surviving that regularly. And that’s ignoring ...


4

Yes, a cleric can UMD items of opposed alignment spells. UMD is always available for activating any item, regardless of your class or class features. This is also why a specialist wizard can use UMD to activate items from banned schools. Doing so is still an aligned action, so doing so too often can change your alignment and put you in disfavor with your ...


3

It is relatively trivial to make a spreadsheet calculate average damage for iterative attacks. So long as you know all the variables, reducing attacks vs AC x to an average damage means that you can roll the highest attacks, because they're fun, and then for the subsidiary attacks, to simply apply the average damage. The player should create a lookup table ...


3

The horse breeds are in the Champions of Valor monster section, hidden under the "Agents of Good" heading (starting on page 153).


3

Unknown. Most Volley attacks, including the Manyshot feat specify that the 'arrows', 'spines', or 'small thrown weapons' (Palm Shot), use 'the same attack roll' and 'only apply precision damage once'. This seems to indicate a single attack, which is therefore a single hit, and is therefore deflected entirely by Deflect Arrows. However, it doesn't say ...


3

The rules are obnoxiously vague: Powers stored in command thought items are usually not augmented, because the manifester level of such an item is assumed to be the minimum possible to manifest the stored power. Powers stored in use-activated items are usually not augmented, because the manifester level of such an item is assumed to be the minimum ...


3

RAW, yes, but no one lets that happen. The spellweaver’s spellcasting ability is not marked Ex, Sp, or Su; that makes it a “natural ability” of the spellweaver. Natural abilities are defined thusly: abilities a creature has because of its physical nature. They are also explicitly placed in a category separate from Special Abilities. ...


3

No Spellweave is an Ex special quality, so a Master of Many Forms 7 would get that. Spellweave itself doesn't say "Sorcerer spells", it just says "spells". So it would be usable with the MoMF's Druid Spells. But, the Spellweaver's Sorceror spell casting is not Ex, and MoMF (like Druid Wild Shape) does not grant the spell casting of the form your change ...


3

A Somewhat Obscure but Semi-official Option The prestige class charlatan appears on pages 62-6 of Dragon #335. The Brilliant Gameologists' forum has a very short charlatan handbook that describes (but doesn't reproduce) many of the class's features. The gist of the class is that, instead of casting spells, the charlatan convinces folks that he cast spells, ...


2

There's a few things I can think of that might mitigate the problems you're worried about. Magic Items The writers of the original Planescape setting seem to have foreseen the problems you're worried about, and included some countermeasures in the rules themselves. First, most magic items come from a very small number of places: The Prime Material Plane is ...


2

Roll Once This increases swinginess but not the average output. Simply roll the d20 once for an entire attack routine and apply the different bonuses to it. This reduces time to resolution dramatically. For example, a fighter with +12/+7/+2, roll d20 and get a 10 - you hit ACs 22, 17, 12. Works fine for claw/claw/bite and any other kind of combo. What ...


1

This may seems too simplistic for an answer, but it might help: One thing which worked really well for me when I was teaching children D&D 3 - 3.5 (even as young as 6 years old), was the combination of these two basic ideas: Use the fast dice variant: roll all attack and damage rolls simultaneously, use different colored dice for different attacks. ...


1

I got this idea from mxzyplk answer to use a single roll, and from KRyan comments on how this can nerf the warriors in a substantial way. I did the math, and... yep. Rolling a single dice can be harmfull for the figther. Rolling multiple die can, however, be harmfull for the fun, since it can take a long time to resolve a single turn. How we can resolve ...


1

While the back cover explicitly states, "All the rules of the game..." it is in fact not, all the rules in the game. The fine print does explain that a bit though. In many cases, there was a rule in the "core" books that was expanded on, made more explicit or otherwise changed in a companion book. For example, Complete Adventurer added numerous "expanded ...



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