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86

All this does is linearly adjust the normally-flat 5% probability for each number to occur. What results is a increased or decreased probability of any number above or below average to occur, positively for advantage and negatively for disadvantage. See this AnyDice function set, which yields the following: Black is d20, orange is highest of 2d20, blue is ...


75

I wasn't comfortable with some assumptions people are readily making in their comments, so I did some research and a few calculations. I also incorporated some suggestions made in the comments. The crushing weight of the earth He digs a hole big enough for himself (between 3-4 feet deep) Lots of people claim he'd have trouble breathing, which is ...


72

He won't get any sleep, and then he'll die. I get the impression this player hasn't ever tried to sit on the ground for a while in an undeveloped area. There's all manner of creepy crawlies out there. His bedroll will get damp and then it'll get full of bugs--whether they're upset or happy or indifferent about his presence, they'll be omnipresent. Good luck ...


46

Because it's so much easier to bury yourself and your party properly. This does require some resources, but they can basically be gathered from the surrounding forest. Kearny's Nuclear War Survival Skills is an astonishingly good reference. For this purpose, your player will be interested in the pole covered trench shelter (Chapter 5). It provides plans ...


36

Compiled Results DnD Next numbers include calculations from both the 1st and 2nd playtests. Fighter Rogue Wizard Sturdy Wizard OD&D 11 3 2 - AD&D 14 6 2 - 3.5 11 6 3 4 4e(MM1) 13 10 7 9 4e(MM3) 11 8 ...


36

"We're here to play a game of heroic fantasy. Tell me what part of this is heroic, or fantasy? It's really kind of weird." There's a subset of players who do weird things out of a sense of paranoia, they never want their characters to be in danger. The problem is, if you're playing a game called "Dungeons & Dragons" it's basically a game called ...


34

They can, sure. But the BD&D rules are quite explicit that they typically have no value. In general, Weapon and armor used by monsters are rarely in good enough condition to sell (BD&D p 42). So they can collect them, they can even use them, but no, merchants won't buy them unless they are particularly pristine.


31

Imagine you have a friend who roleplays in Second Life. There are all kinds of emoting macros there to supplement the textual channel they use to weave their stories. Now put that person on the stage. "This has so few options, I can't do anything except stand here and talk!" That would be obviously ridiculous, right? The situation is the same in D&D ...


30

The cleric is a Hill Dwarf. Page 13 of D&D Basic Rules v0.1 describes the Dwarven Toughness racial trait that Hill Dwarves have, which grants +1 hp each level, including 1st.


30

Don't feed the trolls If you don't want trolling in your game, don't feed it - don't argue the trolling and rules details. It won't get you anywhere, it will get you frustrated, it will waste time and encourage such trolling in the future. Those details don't matter, and they're not the reason why you're at the gaming table. Show, not tell You don't need ...


30

Seems legit. Real people having a hard time finding meals can eat like that, and hard-luck adventurers are the kind of people who might see a lot of time between meals. For someone who can afford to eat though, going hungry is foolish. Having a full belly when you have the opportunity to get one is just a matter of being prepared for the worst when you're ...


29

Oho, there are plenty of reasons this isn't a good idea. First and foremost... RAIN! For whatever reason, what if the straw gets blocked? Not to mention that the ground can freeze at night even in warmer temperatures, make sure to have him take penalties from that. No, a bedroll doesn't keep you warm enough in freezing temperatures. Plus, three feet of ...


28

You Should Be Dead, But... Save-or-die mechanics are pretty awful for straight-up challenges. I mean, you wouldn't exactly get a lot of tactical thrills from a game that boils down to "Flip a coin to see if you lose," would you? But that's not the only way they've been used. Practices and opinions vary pretty widely in the OD&D/OSR community, but one ...


26

A lot of the other answers to this question deal with the actual mechanics of sleeping while buried. While they all bring up good points, don't forget that there are plenty of narrative-based consequences the player's actions can have. The PC is obviously an undead Suppose the party runs into a traveling paladin or cleric. What is the first thing they are ...


25

Note that this answer assumes knowledge and familarity with D&D 3.5e. (Dis)advantage: A large number of situations and abilities where you would add a positive or negative modifier to a roll have been replaced with advantage (for positive modifiers) and disadvantage (for negative modifiers). This mechanic involves rolling twice and taking the higher ...


24

The key does lie in not sweating the details, but the trick is that which is the least intuitive one: positioning! Follow three principles and theatre of the mind becomes much easier: Use descriptive detail When describing a fight scene, say in general terms where everything is relative to each other. You're not used to giving this detail verbally when ...


24

note: I'm using a 1 Bar atmosphere rather than the "standard sea level" 1013 or the average on surface of 985 mBar, for simplicity. The Dirt A "standard man" is roughly 45x175cm of frontal area, which is about 0.7875m^2. (The gap between the legs and the gap by the head is eaten by the arms). At 1m depth, that's about 0.7875m^3 of dirt, at 1220kg/m^3, for ...


23

Yup. So you've pretty much got it in one, there. The leveling system itself is a holdover from OD&D and power level diversity present in Chainmail, which is much better explained here. But really, basing your assumptions of how things should work in any edition on the previous editions is a Bad Idea. I really thought we'd learned that one after 4e. ...


22

The mean result goes from 10.5 to 7.175 for disadvantage and to 13.825 for advantage. The odds go from a flat 5% for each of 1 through 20 to (disadvantage results shown; reverse the first column for advantage results): 1 39 9.75% 2 37 9.25% 3 35 8.75% 4 33 8.25% 5 31 7.75% 6 29 7.25% 7 27 6.75% 8 25 6.25% 9 23 5.75% 10 21 5.25% 11 19 ...


22

Based on having run several sessions of the playtest and the fact that little of the standout features have changed since, here are the things that stood out to me on the first pass through the Basic rules: The Inspiration mechanic. We saw from the previewed character sheets in the starter that there are traits/flaws/bonds/ideals, these can be selected, as ...


21

A few folks have mentioned to me that Mike Mearls has stated elsewhere that it's an oversight in the text, and the intent is that a level 1 character should recover 1 hit die. Seems likely errata-fodder. @MrMattFree : Hit dice question! Basic rules say you get half your HD back at a long rest but doesn't say round up. What does a 1st lvl do? ...


21

Though at first glance it might appear, that if the DM does not give out magical weapons, then many monsters in the DM guide book will make half of the party irrelevant unless the DM gives out magical items and thus the game is dependent on magical items, unlike what the article states. However, a close look at the classes and character abilities reveals ...


20

A rogue could perhaps play solo. But only if she devoted herself to stealth and avoided all out combat at all costs. D&D is a very much a party based game. And it's best played with a table full of friends, each with their own character. But at the same time, occasionally circumstances require something less than that ideal. There are two options. Go ...


20

There is a much better way to do this. Later on July 3rd, Wizards released the printer friendly version of the Basic PDF. It is far more useful when it comes to copy and pasting text from the basic PDF into the browser or a word processor. Here is a sample text from there: Blinded A blinded creature can’t see and automatically fails any ability ...


20

The answer is on page 79 of the Basic rules: Material (M) Casting some spells requires particular objects, specified in parentheses in the component entry. A character can use a component pouch or a spellcasting focus (found in chapter 5) in place of the components specified for a spell. But if a cost is indicated for a component, a character must ...


20

Support characters We do this all the time. When one or more characters are separated from the group for a long time, the GM gives the other players characters to play with. The players must acknowledge they are playing secondary characters and most protagonism must be with the main character. In your case, give each player except the cleric a goblin. Give ...


20

Yes. This is, of course, intentional. One of the problems that D&D has always faced is that characters often have wildly different skill values, which can cause issues where some players get sidelined during skill-heavy sessions, because their characters don't have any of the right skills. 4e tried to rectify the problem of disparate skills in two ...


19

This is outside the current scope of the playtest from what I've seen of it. That means that there is no rule to govern it. However, generally in D&D the kinds of simulation aspects you've asked about are governed by attack and damage penalties. In D&D 4e's math scheme, this would be modeled with a -2 penalty to attacks with no penalty to damage ...


19

Yeah, there's no reason that can't be improvised. The classic would be scooping up and flinging sand in your opponent's eyes, which would in most situations* be Dexterity versus Dexterity. Another classic (but slightly more cinematic, so possibly with Disadvantage with non-cinematic DMs) method of blinding an opponent is grabbing their shirt or cloak and ...


19

According to the Basic PDF (page 74) A creature's current hit points (usually just called hit points) can be any number from the creature's hit point maximum down to 0. So no, negative hit points do not exist in 5e. The archived development-poll blog post "A Close Call with Negative Hit Points" explains the history of negative hit points and part of ...



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