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41

Generally, you should only tell them what their character knows. Some DMs don't even tell them the creature's name until afterwards, they just describe its appearance. Let them make a skill check to see how much they know (eg arcana, nature, religion, history - depending on the type of creature. Or perception, if there is some visual clue). Or, if you ...


40

I've played in and run evil campaigns of various sorts in both 3.5 and 4e (though not 5e, I think my learning will transfer), and run into a lot of problems: My Guy Syndrome comes up a lot, as does a tendency to default to a regular D&D storyline only with more stealing of spoons and kicking of puppies to remind ourselves we're evil. Sometimes an evil ...


30

You're using the spell incorrectly. Note that the condition that causes the spell to damage a creature is when the creature enters the beam. It takes movement on the part of the creature (including forced movement) to do that. It does not cause damage when the beam just passes over a creature. As you note, that would be super powerful for a 2nd level ...


29

Awakened Mind reads: Starting at 1st level, your alien knowledge gives you the ability to touch the minds of other creatures. You can communicate telepathically with any creature you can see within 30 feet of you. And from the DM's Basic Rules, page 5: A creature without telepathy can receive and respond to telepathic messages but can't initiate or ...


29

That depends heavily on what you count as "fluff". There is no defined mechanical benefit for wearing gauntlets. However, that doesn't mean that wearing gauntlets is not a thing that can be important sometimes. For example, I was playing in a game recently where there was a sticky goop covering a floor. I touched it, but that made the goop rise from the ...


29

TL;DR If thousands of other people are doing exactly the same thing for years on the net and the current employees of the firm are endorsing it (by participating, streaming, tweeting, linking-to, it) you are in the clear. There are literally tens-of-thousands of blog posts, wikis, podcasts, and vlogs of actual-play including by D&D employees past and ...


28

There is no mechanical or fluff requirement for a Paladin to follow a god. You've quoted the most relevant paragraph yourself, but for a backup, from the same page: Whether sworn before a god's altar and the witness of a priest, in a sacred glade before nature spirits and fey beings, or in a moment of desperation and grief with the dead as the only ...


26

It depends on which spell you use to bring back the dead. There are five different spells that you can use to bring a dead person back to life, and they all work a bit differently, as you might expect. Raise Dead From the spell description: This spell also neutralizes any poisons and cures nonmagical diseases that affected the creature at the time ...


25

If the Moonbeam spell required the actual moon to be shining down, and somehow focused its light (or similar), you would assume that its text would reflect that. No mention is made of this, nor of the restrictions that it would naturally apply to use of the spell. This wouldn't just be a problem indoors - consider phases of the moon, daytime, cloudy nights, ...


25

It is generally helpful for players to have a Player's Handbook readily available, especially for spellcasters who need to reference spell descriptions every now and then. Aside from that, the most help that it will do is speed up character generation and leveling-up, which is good at the table because it allows for more game-time in the session. I find that ...


24

The product you are describing is the 4th Edition Dungeon Master's Kit This was released midway through 4th edition's release and included a book as well as some maps and tokens. Unfortunately it is out of physical print. You can buy the book only as a digital PDF here. There is no "Dungeon Master's Kit" for 5e that has been released or is scheduled to be ...


23

There is currently no equivalent spell in 5e. The Stone Shape spell allows you to, well, shape stone, but only a 5-foot cube at a time. (So I suppose this is an option, just a very slow one.) The Disintegrate spell can disintegrate stone, but only a 10-foot cube at a time. The Move Earth spell allows you to alter terrain in up to 40-foot cubes, but only ...


21

As far as I am aware, there is no way to give a creature the incapacitated condition directly. However, there are 4 conditions that give a creature the incapacitated condition as part of their effects. These are: Paralysed Petrified Stunned Unconscious There are a number of ways to apply these conditions without damaging your beloved pet. Within the ...


21

Not all scrolls are Spell Scrolls. There is a Scroll of Protection. Granted the list of scrolls that NOT spell scrolls is limited to that one scroll. The section on page 200 is specific to Spell Scrolls. The effect of the two rules is that anybody that can read a written language can use a Scroll of Protection while you need the spell to be in your class' ...


21

Remember in D&D RAW, specific overrides general. The general rule for scrolls "any creature that can understand a written language can read the arcane script on a scroll and attempt to activate it" is overridden by the specific rule for Spell Scrolls: "if the spell is on your cast list you can use an action to read it...otherwise the scroll is ...


21

Nothing. There is no current rule that spell effects end when a caster is unconscious or dies unless they are specifically concentration spells. Thus, since Find Familiar is not a concentration spell, it's perfectly reasonable to assume that the familiar stays and is unaffected by the fact that his wizard is unconscious (or dead). And in fact, the ...


19

As far as actions in combat are concerned, the quote you've included pretty much sums it up. A familiar can take any action that it is capable of other than the Attack action. This includes the Cast A Spell action, Dash, Disengage, Dodge, Help, Hide, Ready, Search, and Use an Object. Since familiars are monsters, they can also take any non-Attack action ...


19

Yes, you can cast spells with a Material (M) component without issue. Your Holy Symbol takes care of it. This is one of the more difficult things to look up in the current 5e rules. It starts on page 58, under Cleric spellcasting: You can use a holy symbol (found in chapter 5) as a spellcasting focus for your cleric spells. In the equipment section, ...


19

From page 196 of the PHB: CRITICAL HITS When you score a critical hit, you get to roll extra dice for the attack's damage against the target. Roll all of the attack's damage dice twice and add then together. Then add any relevant modifiers as normal. Note that this only refers to the attack - it doesn't say weapon attack, or anything else that ...


19

You've already stated the key point: 1 reaction, which you take when you are hit by an attack or targeted by the magic missile spell. So what you need to understand here is that the Shield spell involves time travel. No, really, it does. You can cast Shield when you're hit by an attack. Not when you're targeted, or when someone tries to attack you, but ...


18

Yes Targeting Yourself If a spell targets a creature of your choice, you can choose yourself, unless the creature must be hostile or specifically a creature other than you. (Player's Handbook p204) In the case of Greater Invisibility, the caster is specified as an additional target to clarify that the caster is a valid target even when the ...


17

From the PHB, page 195: OPPORTUNITY ATTACKS [...] You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach. While there are certain things that modify this (like the Mobile feat, which I will explain further down), this is the trigger for an opportunity attack. In your example, none of what you did prior ...


17

If it's made by dwarves, we call it dwarven. If it's made by elves, we call it elven. Just because it's called Dwarven Plate does not mean it's made only for dwarves. For magic items, page 140 of the DMG states; In most cases, a magic item that's meant to be worn can fit a creature regardless of size or build. Many magic garments are made to be easily ...


17

Depending on the context of the encounter, the following might be relevant: Surprise If surprised, you lose your turn for the first round of combat. This includes loosing use of any reaction for one round, measured from the beginning of combat until the start of your turn on round two. Which I got from this quick reference: ...


16

The most important thing for an evil campaign to work is to give the players a goal or objective. In a good-aligned campaign, you don't need to necessarily start with a clear goal, and often you don't want to, as often the player's role is reactionary; someone does something bad and the players have to stop them. They do good for it's own sake, because ...


16

Looking through the rules, I can't find any specific guidance for: Dwarven Plate Magic armour Regular armour So, going by the RAW: Yes. Non-dwarves can happily wear it. Page 144 of the Player's Handbook provides an optional rule which would require that armour be adjusted to fit the individual for a cost before it would be wearable. 3.x had rules ...


15

A similar product to the 4e Dungeon Master's Kit is the Fifth Edition D&D Starter Set, which contains an introductory adventure, rules, and supplies for playing the game. It's cheaper than a rulebook and might be a good purchase if you're not sure if he'll like the new edition. The Starter Set will get your son started, but it does not contain enough to ...


14

This is a combination of history and what appears to be a small but significant oversight. The advantage of the Haversack over the Bag has always been that the Haversack always has what you're looking for on top, as compared to the Bag which is a disordered bag of stuff that's harder to sift through the more it holds (and it can hold so much). The designers ...


14

A spell does the damage it says it does. In the case of Burning Hands, it says it does 3d6, so it does 3d6. There are a few exceptions to this: the school of Evocation for Wizards allows you to add your spellcasting modifier to the damage of evocation spells, and certain Cleric domains allow you to add your spellcasting modifier to the damage dealt by ...


14

Mechanically speaking alignment has little to no bearing on play as per the 5e rules. The PHB and basic rules mention alignment a lot, and its specifically described in detail in chapter 4 of the PHB, but how to implement it beyond a notation on a Player's character sheet is not given any space. There a few optional rulesets in the DMG that hinge on using ...



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