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78

All this does is linearly adjust the normally-flat 5% probability for each number to occur. What results is a increased or decreased probability of any number above or below average to occur, positively for advantage and negatively for disadvantage. See this AnyDice function set, which yields the following: Black is d20, orange is highest of 2d20, blue is ...


36

Compiled Results DnD Next numbers include calculations from both the 1st and 2nd playtests. Fighter Rogue Wizard Sturdy Wizard OD&D 11 3 2 - AD&D 14 6 2 - 3.5 11 6 3 4 4e(MM1) 13 10 7 9 4e(MM3) 11 8 ...


29

The cleric is a Hill Dwarf. Page 13 of D&D Basic Rules v0.1 describes the Dwarven Toughness racial trait that Hill Dwarves have, which grants +1 hp each level, including 1st.


27

You Should Be Dead, But... Save-or-die mechanics are pretty awful for straight-up challenges. I mean, you wouldn't exactly get a lot of tactical thrills from a game that boils down to "Flip a coin to see if you lose," would you? But that's not the only way they've been used. Practices and opinions vary pretty widely in the OD&D/OSR community, but one ...


24

The key does lie in not sweating the details, but the trick is that which is the least intuitive one: positioning! Follow three principles and theatre of the mind becomes much easier: Use descriptive detail When describing a fight scene, say in general terms where everything is relative to each other. You're not used to giving this detail verbally when ...


21

The mean result goes from 10.5 to 7.175 for disadvantage and to 13.825 for advantage. The odds go from a flat 5% for each of 1 through 20 to (disadvantage results shown; reverse the first column for advantage results): 1 39 9.75% 2 37 9.25% 3 35 8.75% 4 33 8.25% 5 31 7.75% 6 29 7.25% 7 27 6.75% 8 25 6.25% 9 23 5.75% 10 21 5.25% 11 19 ...


21

Based on having run several sessions of the playtest and the fact that little of the standout features have changed since, here are the things that stood out to me on the first pass through the Basic rules: The Inspiration mechanic. We saw from the previewed character sheets in the starter that there are traits/flaws/bonds/ideals, these can be selected, as ...


20

A rogue could perhaps play solo. But only if she devoted herself to stealth and avoided all out combat at all costs. D&D is a very much a party based game. And it's best played with a table full of friends, each with their own character. But at the same time, occasionally circumstances require something less than that ideal. There are two options. Go ...


20

The answer is on page 79 of the Basic rules: Material (M) Casting some spells requires particular objects, specified in parentheses in the component entry. A character can use a component pouch or a spellcasting focus (found in chapter 5) in place of the components specified for a spell. But if a cost is indicated for a component, a character must ...


20

Support characters We do this all the time. When one or more characters are separated from the group for a long time, the GM gives the other players characters to play with. The players must acknowledge they are playing secondary characters and most protagonism must be with the main character. In your case, give each player except the cleric a goblin. Give ...


20

Yup. So you've pretty much got it in one, there. The leveling system itself is a holdover from OD&D and power level diversity present in Chainmail, which is much better explained here. But really, basing your assumptions of how things should work in any edition on the previous editions is a Bad Idea. I really thought we'd learned that one after 4e. ...


19

This is outside the current scope of the playtest from what I've seen of it. That means that there is no rule to govern it. However, generally in D&D the kinds of simulation aspects you've asked about are governed by attack and damage penalties. In D&D 4e's math scheme, this would be modeled with a -2 penalty to attacks with no penalty to damage ...


19

There is a much better way to do this. Later on July 3rd, Wizards released the printer friendly version of the Basic PDF. It is far more useful when it comes to copy and pasting text from the basic PDF into the browser or a word processor. Here is a sample text from there: Blinded A blinded creature can’t see and automatically fails any ability ...


19

Yeah, there's no reason that can't be improvised. The classic would be scooping up and flinging sand in your opponent's eyes, which would in most situations* be Dexterity versus Dexterity. Another classic (but slightly more cinematic, so possibly with Disadvantage with non-cinematic DMs) method of blinding an opponent is grabbing their shirt or cloak and ...


19

A few folks have mentioned to me that Mike Mearls has stated elsewhere that it's an oversight in the text, and the intent is that a level 1 character should recover 1 hit die. Seems likely errata-fodder. @MrMattFree : Hit dice question! Basic rules say you get half your HD back at a long rest but doesn't say round up. What does a 1st lvl do? ...


18

From the Basic Rules, p22 & p30: The (class) table shows how many spell slots you have to cast your spells of 1st level and higher. To cast one of these spells, you must expend a slot of the spell’s level or higher. You regain all expended spell slots when you finish a long rest. You prepare the list of (class) spells that are available ...


18

According to the Basic PDF (page 74) A creature's current hit points (usually just called hit points) can be any number from the creature's hit point maximum down to 0. So no, negative hit points do not exist in 5e. The archived development-poll blog post "A Close Call with Negative Hit Points" explains the history of negative hit points and part of ...


17

Head designer Mike Mearls has tweeted Lots of Q's about the staggered release: You will not need the MM or DMG to run a campaign. Or the PH or Starter Set to make a character. To what extent this is true in practice remains to be seen! To me, the last point suggests they might have some basic resources available online for free, which might include a ...


16

The math is straightforward With an advantage you are looking for best of two results. To figure out your odds you need to multiply the chance of FAILURE together to find out the new chance of failure. For example if you need 11+ to hit rolling two dice and taking the best means instead of a 50% of failing you have only a 25% chance of failing (.5 times ...


16

Yes. From the D&D Basic Rules: Casting the spell doesn't remove it from your list of prepared spells. Basically, 5e Wizards (and Clerics) are 3.5e Sorcerers who can swap out their "known spells" based on their spellbook (or godly mandate). I can't speak to the exact reason behind the design decision, but I assume they wanted to enable a level of ...


15

Yes. The New York Times revealed on January 9, 2012 that a 5th edition of D&D was in the works for a release at Gen Con 2013. Mike Mearls confirmed it shortly thereafter. An open playtest for the game began on May 25, 2012.


15

To preserve the probabilities exactly, the new DC should be "14 + monster defense." How I got that number So, you want to convert this: d20 + monster_save vs. 8 + caster_modifiers Into this: d20 + caster_modifiers vs. ?? + monster_save Here's how to figure out the "??" using a bit of intuition about probability: Ignore the modifiers for a ...


15

First, I'm not a lawyer, I just have a keen personal interest in IP law, from a desire to be a well-educated consumer and creator. You likely don't need legal advice for this, but if you do, get a lawyer, &c. Yes, the "NDA" is still in effect, but no, it doesn't control use of the retail rules. The Online Playtest Agreement ("OPTA") only covers the ...


15

Yes High Elf simply states: Cantrip. You know one cantrip of your choice from the wizard spell. While cantrips are described as: Cantrips A cantrip is a spell that can be cast at will, without using a spell slot and without being prepared in advance. Repeated practice has fixed the spell in the caster’s mind and infused the caster ...


15

Bounded Accuracy is the culprit behind your observations. Rodney Thompson describes Bounded Accuracy and the why behind it. These are the reasons behind bounded accuracy. Getting better at something means actually getting better at something. Nonspecialized characters can more easily participate in many scenes. The DM's monster roster expands, never ...


15

Yes. This is, of course, intentional. One of the problems that D&D has always faced is that characters often have wildly different skill values, which can cause issues where some players get sidelined during skill-heavy sessions, because their characters don't have any of the right skills. 4e tried to rectify the problem of disparate skills in two ...


15

No OGL/GSL for 5e yet. Plan is an announcement @ 2014 fall. To be released in 2015 At this stage before all core rules are out, there does not exist a public license that grants you the right to create contents based on D&D 5e, whether commercial or not. Here is an official post about it: We want to ensure that the quality of anything D&D fans ...


14

It appears that you have conflicting interests: a lack of permanent character death, but a real threat of death which involves real problems. There are no obvious ways to reconcile these two points. An easy way out of permanent character death reduces the problems associated with dying, and having a god decide to resurrect a player seems too much like Deus ...


14

On Page 58 of the Lost Mine of Phandelver in the D&D Starter Set. Goblins have a ability called Nifty Escape that allows them to disengage or hide as a bonus action. Like D&D 4e the 5e monster stat block spells out any special abilities and exception to the normal rules.



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