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2

Making an attack requires the ability to see the target The most fundamental tasks of adventuring—noticing danger, finding hidden objects, hitting an enemy in combat, and targeting a spell, to name just a few—rely heavily on a character's ability to see. (Player's Handbook, p183) You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature ...


3

Yes, if you issue the command properly. The servant has no voice, but a command like "Draw me a picture of whatever is around that corner" would be reasonable; you might get a stick figure, but it should be able to communicate generalities. Mending clothing requires sight and decent dexterity and reasoning, so it should be able to peek around the corner. ...


9

"Mindless" is probably the limiting factor for this problem. How a mindless servant reacts to this kind of command is simple, really. Imagine how another mindless creature, such as a servant zombie, would react. Unfortunately, I do not see a servant zombie walking ahead, peeking around the corner, and then calling out "I see three orcs and a goblin, my ...


4

A "mindless" force can not see or communicate. It is not a creature or spirit and has no intelligence of it's own. If they are looking for a scout they can communicate with that would fall under the benefits of having a familiar.


11

From the "Your Spellbook" sidebar, page 32 of the Player's Basic Rules (v0.2): When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if it is of a level for which you have spell slots and if you can spare the time to decipher and copy it. Emphasis mine. Only spells on the Wizard list can be learned in this way. In this ...


0

The fact that it is different than real sleep isn't really contested much. There have been comments that they are supposed to be great for mid-shift guards at the very least because of trance. The hard part is how to adjudicate it. I would use the Sleep spell as a baseline for sleeping characters and make them unconscious. Consider their passive perception ...


4

Spells do exactly what they say they do unless otherwise specified. With Command, it does not take effect until the following turn. So yes, no immediate effect, waits for the creature's next turn. You don't affect their current turn with this. With Thorn Whip, pull typically means that every foot of movement must move them closer to you (though this is not ...


-2

The simple answer is not to worry about the rules. I personally try (as much as possible) to avoid the players ever having to think about things in terms of rules, but in terms of what the character is doing or attpempting. My job as DM is to decide how to resolve that action. I may use a pre-defined rule, but mostly I decide on the spot with a ruling that ...


0

Eldritch blast becomes a multi-attack spell but Agonizing Blast clearly states when you cast EB add your Charisma modifier. You're only casting the spell once so you only get the modifier once. I would assume, at higher levels, when you have the ability to target multiple creatures, you get to choose which one of your eldritch beams becomes "agonizing". ...


8

There are two ways to deal with this that I have experience with. Which is better depends on your situation, but both are workable. Ask for a list of houserules. For me personally, I have a really big problem playing in a system where I can't know all of the rules up front. If I'm playing in a game where there are significant house rules, then I'd ask ...


14

Tradition... tradition!1 This is a process that requires a great deal of trust, as you must trust that the DM isn't out to get you. In a more nomothetic2 setup, the arbiter of reality is easily observable and, by virtue of being relatively immutable, is judged to be impartial. However, it was not always this way3. Groups with a more ideographic tradition ...


-5

He may be an awesome GM, but in other people's campaigns and in my own, house rules are written down... often across hundreds of pages with production values rivaling those of commercial rule systems. He should step up and write the stuff down, possibly with player help. As a player you (and your cahoots) can encourage him to do just that.


5

No, the 5e books are not officially available in electronic form, besides the free Basic rules. The one option available to you is to scan the books into electronic form yourself, or have it done for you. While I am not a lawyer, here is the relevant information for you to make your own determination. Though in the US it's not yet settled case law as to ...


1

I've been allowing tranced elves to "come awake" instantly but have not been allowing them to consider a trance state the same as a PC (fully awake) on watch. Disadvantage on perception checks (or a minus 5 on passive perc) is a good way to account for a diminished, but not absent awareness of the surroundings. Thus an all elf party couldn't all go into ...


3

Sleeping is treated as being unconscious. Thus if an elf maintains consciousness throughout their trance, they are fully aware. The big difference here is that the elf maintains consciousness. We do not at this time, have rules for what perception is like when a PC is sleeping (considering the use of unconscious, I'd guess it's automatic failure), so we ...


10

You cannot learn spells of another class without actually multi-classing or picking up a feat like Ritual Caster or Magic Initiate. While there is some overlap in class spell lists you can only ever learn the spells of your class unless you make the choice to multi-class or forgo the stat increase to pickup one of the two feats I noted above. Proficiency ...


-3

Sorry for the aside in advance. You could scan your own copies of them and have them for your own personal use, as long as no one else used the files you create. As much as I like having PDFs of books for easy reference on my computer when I go places, I still prefer having a book at home to actually pull out and reference... I have a library of Advanced, ...


0

Warden, at least fluffwise, can also be approximated by a Paladin with the Oath of the Ancients, which grants some nature powers. Not much in the way of temporary hit points from the class proper, although the Aid Spell is on the Paladin list. The Paladin also gets Lay on Hands, with which it can heal itself, and the level 20 Oath of the Ancients ability ...


10

Not as of November 2014. Per the Mike Mearls interview of 3 November 2014: "We're definitely looking at PDFs, ebooks, and other digital platforms, but no news yet. The goal with anything along those lines will be grow D&D, not just sell ebooks to people who already play the game, so we're putting a lot of work into figuring out that side of ...


9

From the Player's Basic Rules (v0.2), page 71: If a flying creature is knocked prone, has its speed reduced to 0, or is otherwise deprived of the ability to move, the creature falls, unless it has the ability to hover or it is being held aloft by magic, such as the fly spell. So a flying creature that is knocked prone will fall, unless it has the ...


0

This is an interesting situation. Although you can use the 'normal' checks as listed above, I would take a slightly different approach (although still able to be adjudicated through the normal rules). Sometimes the basic attributes for a skill don't cover all its uses. Which Skill? I would base the skill proficiency on the type of animal you are trying to ...


6

Human Healer's Lore Cleric: Human Cleric with the Life Domain Human Earthstrength Warden: Human Druid Circle of the Moon. Your Wild Shape gives you a similar feel to the Warden's temp HP abilities: each animal shape essentially comes with its own pool of extra hit points. If you want something with a closer thematic feel but different playstyle, go for a ...


1

For the Warlord, there's the Battle Master Fighter which approximates some of the Warlord ability set. I don't have any experience yet with using that fighter build, so I don't know how closely it meshes. It may be a case where the best approximation at higher levels is a Battle Master Fighter/Valor Bard.


19

There is no direct porting guide whatsoever and directly porting characters to emulate their tactical abilities in 4e is probably impossible. 5e's combat and class system is wildly different from 4e's. Combat rules are much lighter (charging is only possible if you spend a feat and even then its very sub-optimal, for example) and overall emphasis of combat ...


1

One of the big advantages of Sage, is if you take a fairly broad field of speciality, you can ask the DM almost any question and receive an answer or know where to find the answer to that question. Yes you can't practically apply the knowledge you have of a specific skill such as Alchemy but you know far more lore than most Alchemists and are more likely to ...


6

The Specialty is purely flavor, and doesn't provide any mechanical benefit. The knowledge that a Sage provides isn't meant to be practical knowledge, but more scholarly. For example, a professor of anatomy might know the name of every single bone in your body, but that doesn't necessarily mean that he'd be any help setting a broken bone. In the same way, ...


15

From the PHB page 66: Starting at 2nd level, you can use your action to magically assume the shape of a beast that you have seen before. And page 69: At 10th level, you can expend two uses of Wild Shape at the same time to transform into an air elemental, an earth elemental, a fire elemental, or a water elemental. It seems fairly clear that these ...


-1

The Starter Set. I know you're asking for a free adventure, however the Starter Set can be bought for a crazy cheap price (currently $12 at Amazon) and the included adventure is a very good introduction to 5th edition (and D&D in general).


2

At 8:01 The DM actually explains this. Since the 3 stated that they are looking around at the woods while going to the cart the get to roll Perception. But the person who was walking straight there doesn't get the roll. Something else is going to happen. BUT since the one who rolled who got a success and warned his party about the Goblins there was no need ...


6

I would predicate the rolls based on what the shape changed character is doing and whether or not the observers would be expected to know anything about that animal. A cat lazily sitting by the road near a village ought to be almost impossible for the druid to screw up, but a deer wandering through a camp during the day, that might provoke some rolls (or at ...


1

A bit more outlandish and maybe impractical (depends on what you have in mind / how you're planning your character), but two other options would be: Take 2 levels of Rogue: You get Cunning Action, so you can Dash every turn as a bonus action. Take 2 levels of Monk: You increase you speed by 10, which (unless I'm missing something), stacks with your L5 ...


5

There's no restriction on volume, but gestures are pretty obvious. The Player Basic Rules p79 says: Verbal: Most spells require the chanting of mystic words... the particular combination of sounds, with specific pitch and resonance. Somatic: Spellcasting gestures might include a forceful gesticulation or an intricate set of gestures. Note that ...


7

There are a few ways to do this, but the best one is to get a mount. Even a basic riding horse will allow you to move 120 ft in a round without using any actions. Other options include: Getting a weapon with longer range. A longbow would allow you to attack enemies 150 ft away, or 600 with disadvantage. It doesn't gain the benefits of your Rage, but it ...


11

Tl;dr - The Druid makes a Deception check, an observer has to beat their result with an Insight check. Proficiency in Nature would allow a character who was not proficient to add their proficiency bonus to the whichever of the 2 checks they were making. So, there are 2 questions here. The first is whether the Wild Shaped Druid is physically ...


1

There are two factors to think about: 1) In 5e, you can only have one concentration spell at a time. So you can only have one "buff" going. 2) You want to maximize your action economy. There are three types of actions: action, bonus action, and reaction. 3) You can take damage/instant spells that scale. You have to figure out where the "optimum" is ...


4

It would certainly depend on the spell, but I'd say most of the time he's obvious enough. Though there is no real guidance on this, all of the spell caster art has them being quite vociferous in their casting. So if you want to make a perception check out of it, DC5 or so. Now if a character were trying to cast a spell without being seen or heard ...


4

Command is not a subtle spell, unless you do something about it. The victim must do as you say, but the wording of the spell suggests this is a mental compulsion, not a persuasion effect where the target somehow "agrees" with the outcome (compare this to the 2nd level spell Suggestion). They likely will figure out what just happened. Onlookers might be ...


11

The only component of Command is a verbal component. From the spellcasting rules on verbal components: Most spells require the chanting of mystic words. From the Command spell: You speak a one-word command to a creature you can see within range. So the question is whether the spell requires verbal spellcasting in addition to the one-word command. ...


5

A character with Jack of All Trades has a baseline for all skills of half their proficiency bonus. They are not however proficient in those skills, nor do they "Add their proficiency bonus" to those skill rolls. They add half of their proficiency bonus. Thus a Rogue 11/Bard 3 would not benefit from Reliable Talent for skills where they benefit from Jack of ...


0

I think that one of most difficult things to hide would be your eye color. How would you cover that up? I'm finding myself at this disadvantage also since I'm interested in running a drow rogue. A cowl with a face mask could work fine and if needed be i could use make up to make my skin lighter or dye my hair; eyes are a different matter for drow since ...


12

It's one attack even though it has multiple damage types. You roll both damage dice and apply the damage. She drops to 0hp. With 0 death fails or saves. On her next turn she makes a death save. If she then gets hit again while down at 0hp she will automatically gain 1 death fail.


12

No, it's all one attack. The bludgeoning damage should not have been applied to her hit points until after you'd also rolled the psychic damage; then you apply it all at once as a single attack. Death saves are per damage roll, not per damage die or damage type. Damage rolls frequently have multiple dice and types, but they are still a single damage roll.


2

In Hoard of the Dragon Queen the eggs that the PC's may or may not take are Black Dragon eggs that are close to hatching. The adventure already discusses what happens when they are taken out of the incubation chamber, smashed or cracked. My players took the eggs and headed back to Greenest. Here's how it played out in our world: No one at Greenest had the ...


11

What happens when a jelly that isn't a wizard splits? The Monster Manual (p 243) says, with my emphasis: [...] it splits into two new jellies if it has at least 10 hit points. As nothing describes these jellies ever combining to reform a single entity, it seems pretty clear that the new jellies are completely independent of each other. Splitting is ...


1

This is an interesting case, but it doesn't work any differently to usual. The wizard can split into as many jellies as they want. When shapechange ends, the wizard will revert to their own form. A troll with loathsome limbs would have the same problem. In the troll's case, the natural assumption would be that the wizard would revert when the main body ...


9

It's one damage roll, it's applied to all characters. How I do this in my games is have the damage rolled before anyone makes their save. So the caster determines the damage before the saves are rolled. Then each character makes their save and the effects are adjudicated after the saving throws are made. Page 196 of the PHB has this rule: If a spell ...


1

A mechanical reason to roll the dice is that the variability of hit points (PC/NPCs; with the same hit dice) when only using average hit points is zero, while there is nonzero variability (PC/NPC) when using dice. Variability is important for a few reasons. First, the more variability, the more surprise and uncertainty. Some folks hate uncertainty. Some ...


2

A) The DM requires it. Sometimes, there are DMs that just want the good old fashioned roll to level system. B) It's more fun. Many people enjoy the risk they feel whenever they roll the dice. C) It adds more challenge to the game. Having a slightly weaker character makes the sense of danger more real. Plus, optimization takes longer for the player as well. ...


2

Although the mathematics involved do state that using high-average is a winning option, the game really isn't about winning or losing, thus we cannot simply weigh an argument based on mathematical logic. Each player and GM places their own value on various aspects of the game, and no answer is completely wrong as long as it promotes the enjoyment of the ...


1

Although I don't have a direct quote or link, WOTC has stated that this is to be a living rules set with changes as needed. They do intend to have errata, but they are not trying to rush an answer and the intent they provided about the issue of errata was that they want to go to the community itself to find appropriate answers (much the same way as they did ...



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