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1

After all, like with the quarterstaff the spell doesn't actually boost a greatclub statswise so using one would only be flavor, so excluding greatclubs doesn't really make sense. Yes, exactly. Since the Shileligh spell only increases a club to 1d8, and a greatclub already has that damage die, there is literally no risk of imbalance if a multiclass ...


3

Yes, a D&D party can function just fine without a dedicated healer. I've played D&D in various forms for the better part of two decades, from 2nd edition, to third, to a high variety of d20-sytem / OGL variants, and not once has the absence of a healer rendered a party unable to adventure. And this was in systems prior to 4th, which sped up the ...


2

It is specifically stated in the Adventure League Guide that DM's are given latitude to adjudicate rulings that aren't expressly defined, and that a DM is encouraged to go so far as to modify an adventure in order to ensure it stays appropriately challenging, and appropriately fun. Examples they use of this aspect is adding NPC's and altering or adding ...


14

Things don't really work all that well without a dedicated healer. But there are some things you can do to work around it. The first and most obvious would be to provide plentiful healing potions. Your heroes should be able to find, and purchase, these fairly easily (maybe even at a reduced price, make up a story reason if you need one). For the first few ...


2

My experience with the starter kit says no None of the other magic user classes seem to have viable in-combat healing spells or abilities and that is where it is most important to have healing. Potions of healing only heal 2d4+2 HP, take an action to drink, and cost 50GP each. This is assuming that in your adventure/setting you able to buy as many as you ...


3

There are no weapon groups as in previous editions Bows, axes, maces, etc. are not grouped as a weapon property in 5e. The only keywords that seem to be used are those like finesse, heavy, and reach to denote particular abilities of a weapon. As such a club and a greatclub are not grouped under a "club" type. For the purposes of the Shillelagh your really ...


1

This precedent exists for prior editions of D&D, however at this time there is no mechanical relation of weapons of similar kind or name beyond the ones that are codified. That being the keywords (finesse, heavy, light etc), the types (simple or martial), and the damage types (bludgeoning, slashing, piercing). You can see a marked difference between ...


0

As written, manacles are not very useful for long-term containment of adventurers...not on their own, anyway. But manacles are never an all-in-one containment solution anyway; they're only intended to resist being broken long enough for the guy who applied them to say "STOP DOING THAT" and jab the character with a pointy stick. Organizations with bigger ...


1

The problem you are describing is a problem with many DnD actions, regardless of edition. Basically, if there is no penalty for failure, and an attempt doesn't take very long (say a round), any character who could feasibly do something will do something in roughly two minutes or less, simply by trying over and over. The same holds true for bashing open a ...


1

There are no official answers from the adventurer's league at this time. However, I think we can apply some rational thought and come up with a good answer in the meantime. All Adventurer's league PCs start out at L1s, Wild Shape is a L2 ability, so I would track what you've seen while adventuring. You might be able to make a case from your background of ...


9

It is an action to break a grab, it would be the same to break out of restraints. Miniman's illustration of Morpheus is a great example of this. Breaking or escaping manacles is a relatively quick process for an adventurer. A Fighter is just going to flex his muscles and strain a bit and the chain will break. The rogue is going to flex her fingers and ...


6

Shield specifically specifies that you are "hit" with an attack. Parry specifies that you are damaged. Generally things that allow you to use your reaction will proc on one of several conditions: You are targeted. You take this action before you know the outcome of the roll You are hit. You take this action after you know the outcome of the roll You take ...


4

This information is currently not contained in the rules and is generally in the purview of the DMG (which will not be released until November). Until then, I would class most objects as having a DC of 5 or do (10 - 5 for a Dex of 0). Armored or particularly hard objects would have an AC equivalent to roughly their amount of armor, so somewhere between 10 ...


3

I don't see any problem with this from a mechanical perspective. In effect you're just using a custom race for your PC with a significant amount of flavor elements. I would model it on an existing race (probably the race of your druid), and modify the flavor rather than the mechanics (or maybe one racial feature). It's appealing that this is mechanically one ...


8

Spells will specify if they stop or somehow don't have an affect when you are unconscious. Spirtual weapon makes no such mention, so it hangs around doing nothing while you are out. Summoned creatures for example all say: dissapears when it drops to 0 hit points or when the spell ends. And all such spells have the concentration mechanic on them. ...


5

While the question you ask is theoretically simple, there are a lot of factors that need to be taken into account when dealing with this. The difference between the two builds isn't just "Oh, I'm going to change out a couple of levels and have basically the same character!" There's a lot of differences, and there can be a lot of things that change between ...


-2

You can't dodge before combat starts, but if you're kicking down the door of a goblin barracks, the DM should declare that the combat started before you kicked down the door. Preparing to dodge and then kicking down the door was the PC's 'surprise round'.


2

A pure warlock will be using EB a lot most likely. But with very little work, you can build a Warlock that is a melee monster. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s7vTgl1KRuR78BDTmMIdJDLbWaRs3RTLhx3CE6QLrDE is the one I've worked out. Pretty solid at range (low CHR), but can nearly keep up with the melee classes in the long haul, has a few pretty solid ...


2

Spending resources (Feats, Ability Points, etc.) to defend against this will likely cripple your character. My suggestion is to play your characters strengths, not its weaknesses. If you absolutely must have some way of defending against it or making it less effective, you have options, but they're costly. Run If you get hit, get out of Dodge. You should ...


10

Assuming you are vulnerable to 8th level spells (meaning no 9th level Globe of Invulnerability), the only way to prevent the Ability Drain effect from Feeblemind is to succeed on the Intelligence saving throw. There are several ways to improve your Intelligence saving throws. Here is an attempt at an exhaustive list in ascending order of inconvenience ...


8

1. Don't play D&D alone. No one character can be proof against everything. Even without digging in the whole ruleset, I think it's fairly likely that there are various attacks which hit the Int-based casters particularly hard too. If you're playing with a balanced party, they'll have your back. Specifically, The spell can also be ended by greater ...


13

There's a limited amount you can do proactively to prevent this. The fact that your int save isn't going to be very good is pretty much a fact of life. If you're targeted by this spell, there's a really good chance you're going to get hit with it. You can take a starting class as something that gets proficiency, but that may not fit every build (and it's a ...


10

Poor* *This only applies to their starting lifestyle for adventurer league play. For a home game you can let them start with whatever they want. It's important to remember that adventurer's league is a specific interpretation of the rules for organized play. More importantly though, this gets at how downtime works in Adv League. Downtime days in Adv ...


1

There aren't explicit rules for this. The description for Counterspell doesn't say, and there's no guidance under Intelligence (arcana). I'm pretty sure this is intentional. D&D 3.x had a "Spellcraft" skill which was specifically used to do this (DC of 15 + spell level, although as with monster identification, I'm not completely keen on that, since it ...


2

Award Inspiration for maintaining a high lifestyle if the character's Background and other roleplaying traits suggest they would do that. Award Inspiration for maintaining a low lifestyle if the character's roleplaying traits suggest they would do that. A street urchin or an uncivilized barbarian should get Inspiration for living in the dirt despite the ...


0

"Your Base AC", and "Your AC" mean the same thing. Normally, your Base AC would mean its the AC you have before you add any modifiers such as Dexterity, and that is how the term is used in the equipment section, however that is not what it means in the Mage Armor spell. Whether you are looking at unarmored defense, which sets your "armor class" to 10 + ...


2

Do I know what spell is being cast? Not through the counter spell itself. In general if there is a specific ability to do X D&D 5e specifies it through keywords or description. See Specific beats general on Page 7 of the PHB or Page 4 of the D&D 5e Basic rules. Do I at least know (somehow intuit, based on VSM components) the level of the spell? ...


10

No. There are no downsides at all (again provided the enemy doesn't have Mage Slayer or some other specific feature) to casting in melee if the spell does not have an attack roll. For all intents and purposes it's not an attack. There are several other rules that govern attacks that don't work with spells that don't have attack rolls. For instance, you ...


2

One other option you can use grappling for: Grapple a person, then use your action to knock him prone. Everyone now has advantage on attacks against him; he has disadvantage on attacks; and he can't get up unless he escapes your grapple, since grappling costs movement. A fighter or a monk could grapple a person, knock him prone, then go to town on someone ...


0

Since any "solution" is going to be some form of house rule, I would like to put in my 2 cents. I feel like it's best to compare the "norm" with the "now" - A character that regularly plays a certain lifestyle should be able to gain benefits due to their experience with that lifestyle. I would weigh it against the character's back story as well as their ...


2

I can see how this would be confusing, especially if you're coming from other editions of D&D. Part of the design of 5e is getting rid of all of the little fiddly situational modifiers, and the new Barkskin is definitely designed to work with the new spirit of the rules. If you look at the D20 version of Barkskin: Barkskin toughens a creature’s ...


0

On your own accord D&D 5th edition is trying to let players and DM handle much of these kind of "rule holes" as they feel right. Personally I would let an Arcane Focus shaped like a staff work like a weapon, but not the other way around (not every staff you find lets you focus magic). Also, regarding improvised weapons on the Basic Rules, it says that ...


2

Your base AC is exactly what your current AC calculation method says. Base AC is not a defined term, but to me it represents the less situation part of your AC. Current/total AC = base AC + temp/situational bonus/penalties (like those given from the shield spell). You will not be adding your dex mod twice when using Mage Armor. You only (sometimes) add ...


9

Your "base AC" is your AC before any modifiers. However, it is not a defined game term at this time as it has little or no use outside of the Mage armor spell. Such modifiers may include: Class based bonuses like from a Fighting style Magic bonuses from items Temporary bonuses from spells. Other things not included in this list. So your "Base AC" is ...


0

A fourth option for rewarding player character's nonoptimal downtime behavior such as spending gold on luxury items, consuming good food & drink, playing games, carousing & enjoying tavern music, etc., is let the players earn 1 XP per 1 gp they spend above the 1 gp/day expense for a "Modest" lifestyle. (See the designated answer to my similar ...


15

Yes, the bard gets 1/2 proficiency to initiative. In 5e all checks are ability checks. This is why every check in published materials is listed as Strength (athletics). If you can add an ability modifier to a roll, it's an ability check (unless it's a saving throw or an attack, those aren't ability checks). If you happen to have a skill related to that ...


26

Yes! The initative roll is a dexterity ability check, and is intend to gain a benefit from "Jack of all Trades" At the beginning of every combat, you roll initiative by making a Dexterity check. Players Handbook p. 177


2

Lifestyle Die Between adventures, your lifestyle earns you a Lifestyle Die. It's a single die ranging from D4 to D8. If you're living good, the die can be used as an extra Hit Die to heal, or rolled for a Saving Throw, once, and then it's used up. If you're living poorly, I'll decide when it gets rolled and it's subtracted from a Saving Throw, or a ...


6

You can, but I wouldn't This is a matter of taste and group play, but I would not enforce mechanical differences for lifestyle differences like that. In the real world, much of those differences are more a matter of comfort than effectiveness, especially once you get used to them. I spent time in the Army where during field exercises and actual ...


2

Maybe... let's say that you have a Cleric in the group who made a poverty(?) pact. He cannot gain Inspiration if he sleeps into best best room in town, while he should be rewarded for sleeping with pigs in a stable as per Joshua's quote from the PHB. As written, Inspiration should be given for roleplaying your character features. I would use Way 2 but ...


13

Since the rules in the players handbook don't offer much DM advice, I have toyed with the idea of creating random tables for each of the life styles. In the spirit of the rules stated in the Players Handbook, page 157: Your lifestyle choice can have consequences. Maintaining a wealthy lifestyle might help you make contacts with the rich and powerful, ...


12

You can award it at your discretion, however... Simply giving inspiration for having a better lifestyle does not seem to be in the spirit of inspiration. Your DM can choose to give you inspiration for a variety of reasons. Typically, DMs award it when you play out your personality traits, give in to the drawbacks presented by a flaw or bond, and ...


17

Generally, I think you're on the right track to try to enforce some mechanical consequence to the choice of lifestyle. I think the right choice is to use the second option more often than not. In specific circumstances (especially in social interactions), certain kinds of lifestyles should grant advantage or institute disadvantage. For instance, if you're a ...


2

You are absolutely right, an Eldritch Blaster is usually stronger After the 2nd level, when you get Agonizing Blast you can do d10+Cha damage, the same as a Longsword two-handed, if you are Strength primary. You can attack twice with both on level 5. At level 11 Eldritch Blast pulls ahead with 3 attacks, and the Charisma bonus on the Pact Weapon damage on ...


5

Yes! When you take levels of a new class, you get all of the benefits of their class features. When you gain a new level in a class, you get its features for that level. A few features, however, have additional rules when you're multiclassing... While channel divinity is one of the things that is listed as having a special rule surrounding it, Cleric ...


13

I couldn't quite follow your logic, but this is how barkskin works. If your AC is less than 16, it is now 16. If your AC is greater than 16 it is not changed. If your AC was less than 16 before you cast barkskin, so it is currently 16, and then something changes to improve your AC further, then you calculate your AC with the new item ignoring barkskin. If ...


1

It seems to me that this build is viable but not optimal. Dual wielding weapons will be better than using a 1d8 rapier (you'll be doing 2d6 when you hit both time). When your cantrips or spells would be better used than attacking with a weapon, as a "free action" (those don't have a real term in 5e) you can stow one of your weapons, giving you a free ...


10

The bonus proficiency is a domain feature. Domains are a class feature. The multiclassing rules state that you gain the class features when you get a new level in the new class. It then lists exceptions to this with channel divinity, extra attack, spell casting and unarmored defense. Domains are not listed, so it seems that the bonus proficiency is the ...


4

This really isn't as viable as you'd probably want it to be. First, there really isn't a way to hide and play in melee at the same time (unless you're a halfling). Second, a 16 AC is OK at first level, but will be pretty bad late in the game (the couple of high CR creatures we've seen would hit that 95% of the time, which is as much as they can). So ...


0

Addressing the Draconians specifically, the PHB states in a sidebar of the Dragonborn section that Draconians are functionally identical to Dragonborn, save that their breath weapon and resistances were traded for a different ability. We can guess that the specifics of this will be in the DMG with Kender, Warforged, and other information that is specific to ...



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