New answers tagged

1

Dim-light does not impose disadvantage on attacks, only on perception checks that require sight, so yes, he can sneak attack from dim light provided he has advantage from some other means. Regarding lighting, only total darkness (or otherwise being unable to see your target) imposes disadvantage on attacks. So, you could effectively sneak attack from ...


0

You are interpreting the Skulker feat incorrectly. All it does is remove the disadvantage you normally have on Wisdom (Perception) checks in dim light. It says nothing about removing disadvantage for attack creatures in dim light. Thus (at least by RAW), you would still have disadvantage and be unable to sneak attack, even with the advantage you have from ...


0

RyanReads has the best one-sentence advice. Just keep the plot simple. Let the complexities come from the players. As an extension of that, delegate. If you have a player that's always there promote them to the game's scribe. A scribe jots down information that's discussed at the table and gets the other players up-to-speed when another session ...


4

I may be off, but here are my two cents: RAW states (my emphasis): You create linked teleportation portals that remain open for the duration. Choose two points on the ground that you can see, one point within 10 feet of you and one point within 500 feet of you. A circular portal, 10 feet in diameter, opens over each point. If the portal would open in ...


1

Is it needed? Before I suggest, let me ask up front, why is a second character needed? If it is to make up for a lack of certain skills (healing, thief skills, etc.), you could just as easily write them out of the adventure. Give some extra potions to make up for not having a healer. Eliminate locks and traps when feasible. Other than the PC being a ...


4

Let the player play two characters I know this might not be exactly what you're looking for, but maybe you just let the other person play two characters instead of having one of your own involved. This can be a bit tricky with him trying to play two characters, but in a recent campaign I played in (1 on 1). I played a barbarian and a wizard. The only thing ...


1

The answer is in the text for Sleep: Creatures within 20 feet of a point you choose within range are affected in ascending order of their current hit points (ignoring unconscious creatures). Ascending order means lowest to highest.


0

I usually direct my campaigns as a Doctor Who season. One-shot adventures with a satisfactory beginning and end and a more-or-less important "season/campaing" overarching plot and character growth/development. It isn't very important if some characters aren't there in every "episode". It actually makes it more interesting if you know which ones are gonna be ...


11

One good way to handle this is to make your GMPC a "follower" of the other PC -- that is, they're less experienced, less familiar with the world, generally less capable (you can do some of this with feats and skills, by having your GMPC less skilled in things like local knowledge, politics, tactics, etc., but competent in things like actual combat, survival, ...


7

First, don't call your character a PC. What you want to do in this case is to give a long-term NPC. Don't worry, NPCs are people too, your player can enjoy roleplaying without you making a GMPC (which is usually not a good idea). Now onto the actual question: The NPC could be subservient to the player. A loyal servant, somebody under their command, a hired ...


1

This is a similar situation to an issue that I had with a black dragon wyrmling. There is a way to force an alignment change and it would take a simple Geas spell, although I am unsure about the moral justification for it. Forcing someone to be someone they are not is just as evil as anything they are doing. Anyway Nitsua60 explained this method or rather ...


0

This sounds incredibly similar to something I'm playing with a bunch of friends in which the system utilizes GURPS for a revolving DM called Infinite Worlds. The great thing about this style is that not only does everyone get a chance to DM, but they also have the ability to pick up and play just about whenever is necessary. You may be able to adopt a ...


1

For me the big challenge was management of real time. Especially since people who can only play infrequently are often people who can only spend a fixed amount of time for a session. Since each adventure absolutely must end by the end of the session, you need to have some in-game resolution for things like running out of time in the middle of a large ...


4

Megadungeon All sessions start in the village. At any time when not in peril and the party knows the way back the party can declare that they return to the village - this ends the session. If the session time expires before they return, roll on the "What really bad thing happens to my PC while returning to the village" table. Shamelessly nicked from ...


21

The easiest way to do this is to give the PCs a base. Whether it be a fortress or house they own or a village or town they are invested in. From this you can start building up a map around them. The quests could then range from setting up trade from a nearby city so the farmers can grow food more efficiently, to defending the village, to stopping a ...


4

My suggestion would be to keep your through line simple. Consider the Marvel movies. Each has its own plot, villain, focus, and supporting cast. But the primary through line is the infinity stones---the handful of MacGuffins---leading up to the inevitable confrontation with the big bad. These movies are years apart, but we can follow along without having ...


7

One thing you can do to help your players feel like they are involved in a bigger plot is to intertwine the overarching story with the session-adventures. In each adventure, leave clues to something bigger going on. Eventually, even if you meet infrequently, your players will start to realize there is something more. Don't make these clues subtle, either; ...


5

One way is to try to structure it as an episodic drama. Basically "a TV series, with one-episode plots and maybe 1-5 season story arcs". That is, you limit the size of each session to be an episode, complete within itself, with a start and a resolution achievable within the time needed. Once you've found a suitable pacing, you can then start weaving ...


-3

I always envisioned the mimic as some sort of slime in its natural form. The Monster Manual states that the Mimic returns to it's "amorphous form" when slain, and the definition of amorphous is "without a clearly defined shape or form."


3

I do a similar thing for FFG's Star Wars, I started off running a campaign but it became difficult to keep it going due to scheduling conflicts, etc so I changed to running a series of loosely-interconnected games called Adventures on the Outer Rim. I have found the easiest way to keep the different games connected is to use elements that are shared between ...


8

I would say no and here is why: Thrown. If the weapon has the thrown property, you can throw the weapon at a target to make a ranged attack. ... Versatile. This weapon can be used with one or two hands. […] when the weapon is used with two hands to make a meele atack Thus being Throw a ranged atack Versatile (meant for meele atacks) would not apply. ...


5

Yes. Nothing in the Blink spell description prevents you from using a reaction that you have. However, there are some common reactions that no longer apply or may be less useful when you're on the ethereal plane. For example, when on the ethereal plane you can't attack someone on the material plane. "You can only affect and be affected by other ...


-1

If you have immunity, you just do not get any damage from that type of damage. Since the spell clearly says you get frighten, it is clear to me that if you are immune to being frighten, then the spell fails (the illusion may still be created and going, but it does not affect you at all). I understand that the damage says "psychic damage" and not being ...


8

Ask your DM. If you are the DM: Make a Ruling. The rules explicitly point out that other situations may arise where a Concentration check needs to be made, based on the GM's assessment of a situation in the game. In the description of Concentration (Basic Rules p. 79-80 ), the following comes after the three triggers for concentration to end: being ...


-6

There are three methods mentioned in the rules to interrupt a spell with a duration of concentration: Casting another spell requiring concentration Taking damage Dying/becoming incapacitated Outside of these three methods, there are no ways to interrupt concentration.


10

Phantasmal Killer has been errata'd http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/PH_Errata_1.1.pdf Phantasmal Killer (p. 265). The frightened target makes a save at the end of its turns, not the start So the complete exact text is: You tap into the nightmares of a creature you can see within range and create an illusory manifestation of its deepest ...


8

Yes. The frightened condition and the damage caused by the spell are separate. I read the (amended) spell description as follows: You tap into the nightmares of a creature you can see within range and create an illusory manifestation of its deepest fears, visible only to that creature. The target must make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed ...


17

Nowhere in Blink's description, or the description of the Ethereal plane on page 48 of the DMG, does it say anything about limiting your use of reactions in any way. So yes, you would still be able to use your reaction while on the Ethereal plane. You can't, however, use your reaction to make an opportunity attack against anyone on the plane you originated ...


-4

Here's the basic list for any druid. Refer to the monster manual for stats and attacks. Level 2: Max CR ¼, no flying or swimming speed (0) Baboon, Badger, Cat, Deer, Giant Fire Beetle, Goat, Hyena, Jackal, Lizard, Rat, Scorpion, Spider, Weasel (0.125) Camel, Giant Rat, Giant Weasel, Mastiff, Mule, Pony (0.25) Axe Beak, Boar, Draft Horse, Elk, Giant Badger, ...


-4

From the Player's Basic Rules v0.3, page 70. You can also interact with one object or feature of the environment for free, during either your move or your action. The DM might require you to use an action for any of these activities when it needs special care or when it presents an unusual obstacle. I would rule that removing an item from a worn ...


4

Somewhere between 25,000 GP and 125,000,000 GP. * And it sells for full price. Gemstones are small, lightweight, and easily secured compared to their same value in coins. - DMG 133 The DMG does not give the weight of gems, unfortunately, but it does say that they are lightweight compared to coins, so for my calculations, I used the same weight as ...


1

In past editions, clerics could also become liches, and I see no reason why a DM couldn't houserule a ritual that a Warlock could learn to become one as well. Hell, if it was a ritual any spellcaster could potentially do it, which opens up a lot of conceptual space for a Lich.


12

There are three ways to forcibly change something's alignment on the books. But none of them really work out well for you.... Forced attunement. Arguably the least dangerous option, if you can somehow force the dragon to attune a magical item you might change its alignment. Perhaps a Geas? If your DM sees that working, and you have any of The Book of Vile ...


-5

No, you really can't change essential nature. Alignment indicates tendencies, not absolutes. You can train the wyvern to do good, but it's nature will always steer it to thinking selfishly for itself. Any training and listening will not be loyalty based, but based on fear of consequences and tangible rewards for loyalty.


8

You don't need two hands to hold the weapon just two hands to wield it effectively, that is to attack. You can take a hand off to fumble around for a potion or scribble a magic symbol in the air. Keep in mind your turn is an expression of what you can do in 6 seconds. 6 seconds is quite a bit of time.


-3

In any standard economy, the price for an item is dictated by the fixed cost, variable costs, and expected profit margin. Translating this into your campaign is relatively simple but may require some additional planning and record keeping. Creating a magic item requires: Fixed costs: Shop space to craft the items-one can probably assume that powerful ...


5

It's not that they don't know, they just might not remember. Throughout my educational career a staggering amount of information was supposed to be drilled into me. I probably remember not even half of it. We get bombarded with information on a daily basis, we can't be expected to have it all at the ready at any given time. I like to flavour knowledge ...


1

I don't think this is so much an alignment question as it is perhaps for how to use personality traits. Alignment in 5e seems to be more of an aspiration rather than a confining factor. I.e. "My paladin is lawful good and so does his best to uphold justice and represent the common good" And use the personality traits to describe how your character is ...


4

There are no rules governing sound and audibility. And at first I thought this would be a simple "rulings, not rules" matter in 5e. "C'mon, have you ever heard a music box?" I thought. "Just figure it out in ten seconds with your GM and move on." But... There are a lot of things that depend on sound/audibility. Enough that maybe there should be rules on ...


25

You have to choose one. Subrace is a trait from the dwarf race, with the following description (PHB 20): Subrace. Two main subraces of dwarves populate the worlds of D&D: hill dwarves and mountain dwarves. Choose one of these subraces. And yes, you get both bonuses (so +2 Constitution and +1 Wisdom). (Note that there is a third official subrace ...


2

The rules1 are silent on any mechanical detail regarding "how far away the two Gnome items can be heard." That means that it is up to the GM to rule on, which is a common 5e D&D approach: rulings over rules. Music Box. When opened, this music box plays a single song at a moderate volume. The box stops playing when it reaches the song’s end or when ...


-2

Price is a function of demand and supply. If you have 500 pounds of gems you might have a enormous surplus of supply, and the price should therefore decline. How much do they decline? That depends on a lot of factors. Do the villagers realise that it is the stolen tribute on it's way to the king as frodoskywalker suggest? If so do they fear the King will ...


10

Depending upon the gems... a "typical gem" is 1 coin-weight. Or about 1/50th pound. Or about 45 caret-weight. (5E doesn't have a specific reference for this, but older editions do.) The site linked to uses 18th-20th century relationships, but uses the same category values as the DMG... kind of. DMG 134 gives specific types for the default Forgotten Realms ...


8

In my experience players don't read enough about the setting in advance even when material is available. Neither will giving them a 4 hour lecture in advance solve the problem. I'll give the players enough information in advance to allow them to make characters with in scope of the group template I usually decide. I try to teach the players about the ...


26

"Not from 'round here" I've used "you were practicing in your master's keep, when there was a blue flash. When you woke up, the moon above was wrong... wrong color, wrong mare, wrong size, and wrong phase." This works quite well for players who don't have history and religion skills... for the religion skill, finding that the local gods have the same myths ...


14

Start from this basic assumption: the character's grew up in this world, therefore they know what a person who grew up in that world would know. Next, follow this simple rule: the players are on a need to know basis. That is, if the knowledge is not necessary for them to make the decisions they need to make to achieve their goals then, unless they ask, you ...


32

There is no way to know how much they're worth, since value-per-weight depends on not only what kind of gems they are, but also on how much they're worth in the local economy. (If a small town had 500 lbs. of gems sitting around, there's a good chance they're not worth a lot, are fake, or are otherwise not worth as much as you might think. No town can afford ...


7

It's all relevant to the campaign. There is no hard and fast "give your players X amount of gold every day" There's a few things to take into consideration when deciding how much gold your party "needs". How much XP you're giving them every day What they can spend their money on in your campaign What your party plans on doing with their money What type ...


14

Chapter 7 of the Dungeon Master Guide has a nice set of tables regarding loot. I recommend giving them a chance. After having used them for a few session you will get to know how well they fit your DM style, and you'll be able to adjust the loot up or down as you feel appropriate. A nice feature of the tables is that they take into account challenge rating ...


2

This is what I managed to find from the creator or the Realms and Waterdeep, although it only refers to Waterdeep. From a Candlekeep forum thread from 2014 on the climate of Waterdeep: A warm current and winds both make Waterdeep more balmy than it would otherwise be. And Mount Waterdeep shelters much of the city from the direct force of storms blowing ...



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