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0

If a Druid casts Heat metal from hiding at 60' on a knight and dashes away, then the knight ends up taking 20d8 damage, since it takes 1 min to doff heavy armor. In this basic 1:1 scenario, yes. That seems pretty powerful. But a knight would be rather lost riding into a forest all alone anyway. Having help doffing armor will halve the damage. ...


2

You can use disengage to do this, but disengage provides no movement on its own. You have to use your movement, it just prevents opportunity attacks. See the definition: If you take the Disengage action, your movement doesn’t provoke opportunity attacks for the rest of the turn. (Players Basic p72). This lets the rogue move right through enemy lines ...


1

The rule on a occupied space is as follows In contrast, you can move through a hostile creature's space only if the creature is at least two sizes larger or smaller than you. Remember that another creature’s space is difficult terrain for you. There is a note under Space on page 191 that says A creature's space is the area in feet that it ...


4

There's nothing in the rules to prevent you from interacting with an object in an occupied space (most of the time prohibitions like that in the rules specify held, I think that's a reasonable bar). Thus you could use your own interact with object free action to pick up their weapon. Though as a DM I may not allow this (since it's more complicated than ...


-3

If you're going up against Druids who use Heat Metal, make sure you have some way to get fire resistance going. Even Resist Fire 10 reduces the damage from that spell from 20d8 to maybe 10 or 20 points total over the entire duration.


7

You're pretty much correct that using Heat Metal on a lone knight wearing plate is game over, but there are some other considerations to remember: Allies The events that you allude to in your question require that you have a lone knight who has no ranged options fighting against a druid in a forest, with plenty of places to hide. Even without Heat Metal, ...


3

If you absolutely feel the need to make a fix here (and to be honest, the situation you present is pretty implausible in actual game play), I'd recommend making the caster stay in range for the duration of the concentration. To be honest, this really isn't a particularly dramatic spell for the fact that it's a 2nd level spell (which means it's at minimum ...


-3

You're assuming the King wouldn't send anyone but plate wearers? Plate wearers follow scouts who don't wear heavy armor, and are followed by wizards and sorcerers who can detect magic.


0

You can milk a stinger if an animal is safely immobilized or sufficiently docile. Complete incapacitation is one way to accomplish that, but you could also could train your wyvern to “sting” a milking vial, thus collecting the poison. This would require the use of Wisdom (Animal Handling) for training the creature to do this. I recommend at least 3 weeks and ...


7

Short Answer: No. In the chapter 9 of the player's handbook, there is a section titled "Damage Rolls", which covers the general rules for dealing damage with weapons or spells. Damage Rolls Each weapon, spell, and harmful monster ability specifies the damage it deals. You roll the damage die or dice, add any m odifiers, and apply the damage to your ...


14

A spell does the damage it says it does. In the case of Burning Hands, it says it does 3d6, so it does 3d6. There are a few exceptions to this: the school of Evocation for Wizards allows you to add your spellcasting modifier to the damage of evocation spells, and certain Cleric domains allow you to add your spellcasting modifier to the damage dealt by ...


0

Technically, Nothing. (Ok, maybe, if the Wizard dies, then, possibly it 'disappears' from the story...or self-suicides) Ok..reading the 5e rules,, it's still a 'spirit' forced into a shape of a common animal...which, doesn't necessarily invalidate the point that it can be trained (without necessarily having to take Animal Training...and some bonus could be ...


3

Taking a page from history, in medieval Europe unemployed mercenaries would sometimes resort to brigandage to supplement their income. Players as bandits aren't necessarily evil with a capital E, they could be more like self-interested Robin Hoods. There's no need to roleplay torture, rape, murder. You could dangle the opportunity for banditry/thievery in ...


21

Nothing. There is no current rule that spell effects end when a caster is unconscious or dies unless they are specifically concentration spells. Thus, since Find Familiar is not a concentration spell, it's perfectly reasonable to assume that the familiar stays and is unaffected by the fact that his wizard is unconscious (or dead). And in fact, the ...


1

Don't read the MM. Either send monsters with no killing tricky features (like harpies have), or give them the important information (or some opportunity to get it) through skill rolls (as others suggested) or NPCs and other in-game ways. The more emphasis on stats, the more the players will take it as a PC game, just with graphics substituted by ...


0

It might be smart to consider how expendable you view your players characters. Is it okay for them to die once in a while fom their mistakes, or should the game never really punish for making bad choices. While it might not be nice for a chacter to die (it sucks really), always keeping your players alive might have draw backs as well. IE your players will ...


11

This is probably more straightforward advice than you're looking for, but my primary strategy is to give the DM everything he needs in one post, or at least as much as I can with the information I have. At the most basic level this means providing both attack and damage dice, whether or not I know that the attack will hit, but this also extends into other ...


5

Most of these questions involve the use of ability modifiers. You can find the table that tells you the modifier for any given ability score on page 13. It's a bit late, but off the top of my head... Your ability scores are much too high for the standard point buy. They may be legal if you're using a different means of generating ability scores (such as ...


16

The most important thing for an evil campaign to work is to give the players a goal or objective. In a good-aligned campaign, you don't need to necessarily start with a clear goal, and often you don't want to, as often the player's role is reactionary; someone does something bad and the players have to stop them. They do good for it's own sake, because ...


38

I've played in and run evil campaigns of various sorts in both 3.5 and 4e (though not 5e, I think my learning will transfer), and run into a lot of problems: My Guy Syndrome comes up a lot, as does a tendency to default to a regular D&D storyline only with more stealing of spoons and kicking of puppies to remind ourselves we're evil. Sometimes an evil ...


13

It is for historical reason based on the intent of E. Gary Gygax when he designed Advanced Dungeon & Dragons. There are a couple of staff items not found in classic D&D and it looks like the 5e author followed Gygax's lead. In OD&D the the Staff of Healing and the Snake Staff were both noted as a clerical. When Gygax created AD&D he expanded ...


4

This depends on your playstyle and the way you want to play. Would the characters' reasonably know about these creatures and is that something you want to have the players' have access to as part of play? Now, there's plenty of old school play where you pretty much know nothing about a creature until you've dealt with it enough to figure out what it can ...


1

As far as the specific case of the Oath of Vengeance, I would rule that the 'greater evil' is subjective to the character. The descriptions of the Oath of Vengeance state that the oath is sworn to defeat a specific enemy. The further descriptions depict the target of vengeance to be the great evil that the paladin is attempting to thwart. The way it is ...


5

You have to balance out the fun of discovering a new monster with how devastating a LACK of knowledge could be to the party. Consider the harpy, with it's ability to lure in folks who fail a DC11 wis check. This could wipe out the entire party if they don't know to plug their ears. So is it more fun (for the players) to know about this and act accordingly ...


-9

Just what they see. Never ever read out the contents of the MM to a player, no matter which edition or indeed RPG. If they want that detail they should go to a sage or learn from experience (or a skill, since 5e uses those :puke:). In particular, you should never feel you have to stick to the MM so you're boxing yourself in if you read out the content. If a ...


4

Figuring out the answer to your question has to start with examining the intent of the authors of D&D 5e. When we look at the paladin one of the first statements we find is this. Whatever their origin and their mission, paladins are united by their oaths to stand against the forces o f evil. The author then go on to explain that paladin uphold a ...


-2

Through all the D&D's, alignment has never been an abstract philosophical concept. It has always been real in a way that it affects the real world. Being evil is no shrouded more-or-less psychatric expertise but a property of (un)living beings just like their height, weight or haircolor. It can change, but it's always clear cut. Your evil flag is either ...


1

There one general rule for making any potions. And additional one specific rule that applies to the making a Potion of Healing. The first method is to look up the rarity of the potion then turn to pages 128 to 129 in the 5e Dungeon Master Guide. There you will find a minimum level needed by a spell caster to craft the potions along with the creation cost. ...


6

If you are talking about the unarmed strike mentioned on page 195 of the PHB the answer is no unless the wild shaped form is a humanoid like a Ape (CR 1/2). Even then the Ape has a superior attack with his Fist. The exact wording of unarmed strike is When you are unarmed, you can fight in melee by making unarmed strike, as shown in the weapon table ...


5

If it has to be a Cleric, you should build a Cleric of the War Domain. All clerics get access to medium armor, shields and simple weapons. Each cleric domain gives you different features as you level up (in addition to the core class features) as well as specific spell lists. The War domain gives you proficiency with heavy armor and military weapons as ...


8

I generally don't give anything away. Discovery is part of the fun to the player. I try to give a very detailed description of the monster as the players would see it (if it's in low light they may not see ALL the tentacles). If a player has a skill that might give them some more information I'd let them roll to see if they'd know a bit more.


41

Generally, you should only tell them what their character knows. Some DMs don't even tell them the creature's name until afterwards, they just describe its appearance. Let them make a skill check to see how much they know (eg arcana, nature, religion, history - depending on the type of creature. Or perception, if there is some visual clue). Or, if you ...


6

Completely rebuild the character. Keep the character concept, and probably the class, race and level, but everything else will have to be redone from scratch. I know this isn't likely what you want to hear, but Pathfinder and 5e are just too different of games for any meaningful conversion that preserves much more than that, because this is already pushing ...


9

Refer to the DMG. Chapter 4 of the DMG has lots of tables and advice for creating NPCs both as party followers and and villains. Focus on fidelity of character and power level over slavish devotion to matching details. Statistical and racial bonuses are going to be very different between the two. You should aim to keep the power level of the NPCs roughly ...


14

This is a combination of history and what appears to be a small but significant oversight. The advantage of the Haversack over the Bag has always been that the Haversack always has what you're looking for on top, as compared to the Bag which is a disordered bag of stuff that's harder to sift through the more it holds (and it can hold so much). The designers ...


-7

You're forgetting that the rules for interacting with a Bag of Holding and interacting with a Handy Haversack are different. A Bag of Holding is simply a bag and if you're looking for something inside, you have to search for it. Retrieving an item from the bag requires an action and has all the penalties of reaching for an item during combat. (In 3.5, this ...


8

This is the general case. Chapter 9 gives rules that tell what you need to do when a encounter requires the characters to resolve their actions within combat. There is nothing that forbids a referee to apply any or all of the combat rules while the characters are exploring a dungeon or moving around. But there is nothing specific either so the referee has ...


16

From the PHB, page 195: OPPORTUNITY ATTACKS [...] You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach. While there are certain things that modify this (like the Mobile feat, which I will explain further down), this is the trigger for an opportunity attack. In your example, none of what you did prior ...


18

From page 196 of the PHB: CRITICAL HITS When you score a critical hit, you get to roll extra dice for the attack's damage against the target. Roll all of the attack's damage dice twice and add then together. Then add any relevant modifiers as normal. Note that this only refers to the attack - it doesn't say weapon attack, or anything else that ...


30

You're using the spell incorrectly. Note that the condition that causes the spell to damage a creature is when the creature enters the beam. It takes movement on the part of the creature (including forced movement) to do that. It does not cause damage when the beam just passes over a creature. As you note, that would be super powerful for a 2nd level ...


7

From page 194 of the Player's Handbook: If the d20 roll for an attack is a 20, the attack hits regardless of any modifiers or the target’s AC. In addition, the attack is a critical hit, as explained later in this chapter. From page 196 of the Player's Handbook: When you score a critical hit, you get to roll extra dice for the attack's damage ...


2

There is no Trap the Soul spell for D&D 5e (yet). It was either deliberately dropped from the book during production or accidentally cut out during editing, but left in the PHB lists.


1

Let's look at it this way; an archer can, as part of their attack action do the following, while maintaining a grip on their two-handed bow with one hand: Reach to their quiver Draw an arrow Align the nock with the string Put the nock on the string Change their grip on the arrow/string Draw the string back Release the string Here we have gripping and ...


8

Yes it can be that deadly. I blogged about the initial encounter in detail in this post. The Party Elven Wizard Human Rogue Human Wizard Human Fighter The Fight Four hours outside of Phandelver the party ran into an ambush set by four goblins. The party roll perception rolls. The goblins rolled various 20s for their stealth check. The Goblins got a ...


2

Pure Sorcerer also considering DMG items with and without feats Now that the Dungeon Master's Guide is out, it's worth revisiting this question. Without any magic items: Draconic Resilience : AC 13 Dexterity 20 (+5) : AC 18 Temporary: Shield spell (+5) : 23 Without any Magic items but with optional feats: Feats (Lightly Armored, Medium Armored for ...


0

The encounter can be made deadly by a DM intent on killing one of the PC's, simply because it's an ambush, and ambushes tend to work extremely well or fizzle out as soon as the first PC comes into passive perception range. My own experience, with a reasonably careful party whose suspicions were immediately roused by the location and the dead horses, was one ...


5

I've run a couple of mental simulations of this combat (in addition to actually running it twice), and it has the potential to be deadly. If the goblins get a surprise round and gang up on 1 character at a time, it is absolutely a deadly encounter. However, if the goblins split their attacks between 2 or even 3 party members, then it's not so deadly. The ...


7

Taking your hand off the weapon should not require any action expenditure - you are just letting go of it, same as if you dropped it. You can then use your free object interaction to restore your grip after casting.


2

Yes you can cast a Bonus Action spell and still attack with a two-handed weapon. Taking your hand off it in the first place should not require any action expenditure - you are just letting go of something, same as if you dropped it. Reloading is part of the attack action with a ranged weapon. To reload, you must first take one hand off the crossbow. If ...


3

It's not simply about spellcaster versus non-spell caster. Clerics, Warlocks, and Sorcerers are determined by major factors that are largely out of the character's hand, and not really a 'choice' once the power is obtained. Those that decide at first level A Cleric starts as a worshiper of a specific deity, and a specific aspect of that deity. This ...



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