New answers tagged

1

It's not that they don't know, they just might not remember. Throughout my educational career a staggering amount of information was supposed to be drilled into me. I probably remember not even half of it. We get bombarded with information on a daily basis, we can't be expected to have it all at the ready at any given time. I like to flavour knowledge ...


1

I don't think this is so much an alignment question as it is perhaps for how to use personality traits. Alignment in 5e seems to be more of an aspiration rather than a confining factor. I.e. "My paladin is lawful good and so does his best to uphold justice and represent the common good" And use the personality traits to describe how your character is ...


3

There are no rules governing sound and audibility. And at first I thought this would be a simple "rulings, not rules" matter in 5e. "C'mon, have you ever heard a music box?" I thought. "Just figure it out in ten seconds with your GM and move on." But... There are a lot of things that depend on sound/audibility. Enough that maybe there should be rules on ...


18

You have to choose one. Subrace is a trait from the dwarf race, with the following description (PHB 20): Subrace. Two main subraces of dwarves populate the worlds of D&D: hill dwarves and mountain dwarves. Choose one of these subraces. And yes, you get both bonuses (so +2 Constitution and +1 Wisdom). (Note that there is a third official subrace ...


2

The rules1 are silent on any mechanical detail regarding "how far away the two Gnome items can be heard." That means that it is up to the GM to rule on, which is a common 5e D&D approach: rulings over rules. Music Box. When opened, this music box plays a single song at a moderate volume. The box stops playing when it reaches the song’s end or when ...


1

Price is a function of demand and supply. If you have 500 pounds of gems you might have a enormous surplus of supply, and the price should therefore decline. How much do they decline? That depends on a lot of factors. Do the villagers realise that it is the stolen tribute on it's way to the king as frodoskywalker suggest? If so do they fear the King will ...


9

Depending upon the gems... a "typical gem" is 1 coin-weight. Or about 1/50th pound. Or about 45 caret-weight. (5E doesn't have a specific reference for this, but older editions do.) The site linked to uses 18th-20th century relationships, but uses the same category values as the DMG... kind of. DMG 134 gives specific types for the default Forgotten Realms ...


4

In my experience players don't read enough about the setting in advance even when material is available. Neither will giving them a 4 hour lecture in advance solve the problem. I'll give the players enough information in advance to allow them to make characters with in scope of the group template I usually decide. I try to teach the players about the ...


19

"Not from 'round here" I've used "you were practicing in your master's keep, when there was a blue flash. When you woke up, the moon above was wrong... wrong color, wrong mare, wrong size, and wrong phase." This works quite well for players who don't have history and religion skills... for the religion skill, finding that the local gods have the same myths ...


9

My initial reaction is to ask: do you require your player's to tell you how their characters know how to walk, talk or tie their shoes? If they have no knowledge of the world then they don't know this either. Start from this basic assumption: the character's grew up in this world, therefore they know what a person who grew up in that world would know. ...


26

There is no way to know how much they're worth, since value-per-weight depends on not only what kind of gems they are, but also on how much they're worth in the local economy. (If a small town had 500 lbs. of gems sitting around, there's a good chance they're not worth a lot, are fake, or are otherwise not worth as much as you might think. No town can afford ...


4

There's a few things to take into consideration when deciding how much gold your party "needs". How much XP you're giving them every day What they can spend their money on in your campaign What your party plans on doing with their money What type and what difficulty of campaign you're going to run How much XP you're giving them every day Page 84 of ...


11

Chapter 7 of the Dungeon Master Guide has a nice set of tables regarding loot. I recommend giving them a chance. After having used them for a few session you will get to know how well they fit your DM style, and you'll be able to adjust the loot up or down as you feel appropriate. A nice feature of the tables is that they take into account challenge rating ...


2

This is what I managed to find from the creator or the Realms and Waterdeep, although it only refers to Waterdeep. From a Candlekeep forum thread from 2014 on the climate of Waterdeep: A warm current and winds both make Waterdeep more balmy than it would otherwise be. And Mount Waterdeep shelters much of the city from the direct force of storms blowing ...


4

'Balance' covers more than just 'balance', if you see what I mean It's a good thing to ask whether your creation balanced, as in whether it is more or less powerful than existing options. But there's also the question of balance as in 'is a good addition?', 'is it out of place?' 'is it useful?', 'could it even have been published in 5e in the first ...


-2

Eh, I don't see why not. It's an interesting character idea, and there are no rules specifically using alignments, so you can totally do it within the rules. Also, that's a really cool idea, and I need to try that!


10

A Strength check is appropriate. Strength Checks, PHB, p. 175 A Strength check can model any attempt to lift, push, pull, or break something ... Ability checks are not saving throws, and proficiency with an ability's saving throws is independent of any bonuses to ability checks. There is no such thing as being "proficient in Strength"; there is ...


3

Warforged and Shardminds are races very specific to the Eberron campaign setting. There is no official 5e material as of this writing, but there is an Unearthed Arcana with a first draft of Warforged on the Wizards site. From that article: Living Construct. Even though you were constructed, you are a living creature. You are immune to disease. You do ...


0

In a quote, "It is not hands that summon us. It is desire!" Powerful uses of the Wish spell are exceptionally strenuous as spelled out in the spell. Whether you are casting it from a scroll, from a ring, from a magic sword, or even straight from your mind all that matters is you are casting it and that kind of mojo has a price.


9

The Luck Blade says: you [...] cast the wish spell from it. The spell may be cast from the blade but you are still the one casting it. Therefore, you would still suffer the negative effects of wishing for anything besides copying a spell.


2

Sadly the rules are, if not silent, very quiet on this issue. In 3.5e this was handled by the Extraplanar subtype that creatures acquired when they traveled between planes and the rule that any creature that was not Extraplanar defaulted to being a native of the material plane. 5e is a brave new world though so we can't just use those rules. Native, or ...


3

As a general rule, unless there is magic involved, you should not remove agency from the players. That is, they decide if their character is intimidated, not the dice. The only thing the player's control in the world are their characters, it's not right for the DM to take that control away from them. Therefore, any affects should happen to the orcs, not ...


9

Let the players choose how to handle it Rather than simply telling the players that the Orcs are trying to intimidate them and roll X to resist, I'd suggest asking the players how they would like their characters to try to resist. Some examples: Be Intimidating right back, cursing at the orcs and calling them cowards Perform a feat of great Athleticism, ...


4

For the oil when and how much damage the character takes depends on how we model it A flask of oil can be used as an improvised weapon to cover a character in oil (PHB 152). If the oil is later lit it deals 5 damage to the character covered. Alternatively oil can be used to cover an area and then, if later lit, deals damage to any creature that enters the ...


1

For the flask of oil: she takes damage on the turn the oil is thrown at her. This then ignites the ... Web: at the start of her turn. This is specifically spelt out in the last paragraph of the spell's description.


-3

native adjective associated with the place or circumstances of a person's birth. "he's a native New Yorker" of the indigenous inhabitants of a place. "a ceremonial native dance from Fiji" (of a quality) belonging to a person's character from birth; innate. "some last vestige of native wit prompted Guy to say nothing" The common ...


5

The rules say the following (Monster Manual, p.220): The mimic can use its action to polymorph into an object or back into its true, amorphous form. This means that it does not require another object to do this. However, mimic's Adhesive ability indicates that it could theoretically do this if it wanted to, but because of the wording of the ...


4

It's up to the DM. The Monster Manual tells us that: A mimic can change forms as an action, so it just takes a few seconds for it to change. Once it has changed forms, a mimic is indistinguishable from the object it is imitating. There's nothing to indicate it needs to consume an object in order to assume its shape, or even that in needs an object to ...


4

The rules don't exclude this, and the description suggest that they do this. 5e Monster Manual (p. 220) says the following in the mimic's rules: The mimic can use its action to polymorph into an object or back into its true, amorphous form. Its statistics are the same in each form. Any equipment it is wearing or carrying isn 't transformed. It reverts ...


11

Yes. Mimic, MM p.220 ... these cunning creatures most often take the form of doors and chests ... As for the limits of a Mimic's abilities? Up to the DM, as dictated by the needs of the encounter, story, and whimsy. Some guidelines are in the Monster Manual.


22

According to the MM, page 220, its true form is amorphous. That means that it is without form in its true state. You could describe it as a blob. Shapechanger. The mimic can use its action to polymorph into an object or back into its true, amorphous form. Dictionary definition: a·mor·phous (adjective) əˈmôrfəs without a clearly defined ...


3

Because there is no direct rule based correspondence with alignment, it wouldn't make any impact on the game mechanically. Because it is solely a role-play feature, there wouldn't be any reason as to why it shouldn't be allowed. As long as you, your DM and other players are comfortable, I'd say it's a green light.


2

The answer is yes; they retain absolutely everything else contained in the stat block excluding the exception mentioned. In this case, size is the only thing that changes. The easy way to tackle this in the future, is if you take a look at a Monster Stat block in the "Monster Manual" you'll see that it has been designed over a piece of parchment. One piece ...


10

From my understanding of the alignment in 5e, it is more representing your general behavior than the other way around. So if you are more of a good human, then your alignment will be good. If you are more of an evil orc, then your alignment will be evil. If you are about 50/50, then you are neutral. I would not foresee your alignment as swinging back and ...


2

This is information explained in the basic rules, but I may see where you've got a disconnect. If your sheet contains precalculated modifiers for skills, those scores are based on your ability modifiers. If a skill is based on Dexterity, for example, its modifier is probably your Dexterity modifier plus, if you're proficient, your proficiency bonus. In ...


14

Sure, but alignment barely exists in 5e There's no rules in 5e on how to simulate a character with a debilitating mental disorder like this. Assigning a different alignment to each personality is sensible, and you could possibly even make a disease condition based on the Helm of Opposite Alignment (sadly gone in 5e) to control the switch. What would this ...


4

5e: Direct information on climate is limited and scattered Currently the Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide is the best source of 5e information on the sword coast. Unfortunately (for our purpose anyway) its focus is on political groups and mentions of the climate in a given area are rare. The island realm of Evermeet is mentioned as being, "the island paradise ...


2

The only official D&D 5e tabletop products in which Baldur's Gate has appeared are: Murder in Baldur's Gate - this includes a 64-page setting book on Baldur's Gate and is probably your best source. Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide - About 2 pages on Baldur's Gate, definitely a summary rather than a source of detail. Hoard of the Dragon Queen - Extremely ...


11

All the Warcaster feat does is negates the need to have one hand free to cast the Somatic component of spells, so long as your hands are occupied by either weapons and/or a shield. It doesn't allow you to cast spells through a weapon. Inflict Wounds allows you to make a melee spell attack not a melee weapon attack. As such, unless otherwise stated in the ...


3

While there is no "touch attack" in 5e D&D, let's walk through how Inflict Wounds works. Inflict Wounds has both Verbal and Somatic components. Somatic components require: A free use of at least one hand to perform these gestures. (p. 203 PHB). The simplest thing to do in the usual case is to drop or sheathe the mace and cast Inflict Wounds, per ...


0

Whether it's 'okay' depends on who you ask, what it is, and why you've made it. Tweaking the existing rules has been covered by other answers quite comprehensibly, so I'm going to focus using homebrew to expand the available content in the form of a new weapon, armour, races, etc., as asked in the first part of the question. Who you ask: Maybe my ...


3

If you break concentration it becomes hostile and might attack you From the invisible stalker entry under Directed Hunter, "...forced to serve until the magic that binds it expires". The magic that binds it is Conjure Elemental and when you lose concentration that magic expires. Then we go to Conjure Elemental which says, "...you lose control of the ...


0

No to cure, maybe to medicine Cure Wounds states, "This spell has no effect on undead or constructs", so it's out. Medicine lets you stabilize dying companions or diagnose an illness. The illness part isn't going to help as a warforged's Living Construct trait makes them immune to disease. They can be dying though so the RAW says you help them out. RAI I ...


3

In general, yes: a creature's type has no mechanical impact. Cure spells work on creatures: constructs are creatures. However, all of the curative spells in the PHB (I think) specifically say they don't work on constructs or undead; this is not a general rule though. Medicine works on "your companions": with a certain generosity of spirit, this extends to ...


8

The PCs are testing the rumor—so make a choice! Your campaign is a custom one, so while purify food and drink maybe should apply only to food and drink that's consumable by a creature of the race casting the spell or by the god that grants the spell or something, that doesn't mean the campaign's pixies aren't actually food for everybody. In other words, ...


-2

Another thing to note is if you are attacking an enemy who is prone. Melee attacks have advantage vs. prone, but ranged attacks have disadvantage vs. prone. This came up in my last game - ranger had knocked a hobgoblin prone, and my warlock was able to attack from 30' with Thorn Whip with advantage.


7

While the default answer would be "work with your DM" you are already doing that. There is no reason NOT to allow it to become a 2H version of a flame blade, since button 4 and button 5 do the following: Button 4: the rod transforms into a climbing pole up to 50 feet long ... The pole can bear up to 4,000 pounds. Button 5: the rod ...


11

5e defers a great deal to DM's discretion. So the real answer is to discuss it with your players, lay out your concerns for abuse, and decide on an answer as a group. That said, there's no good reason not be liberal in your definition of food, especially considering that your PCs do plan on eating it and aren't doing this for some other purpose, like ...


7

Monsters have armor as the DM demands Monsters do not follow the same rules for AC as players do. If you look at the monster creation rules in the DMG you'll find a table that associates AC and HP with CR and can be used to give a rough estimate of a monsters defensive capabilities. When designing a monster you use this table and the result is, "As much AC ...


1

No. Each of these abilities provide a separate reaction and neither provides a way to combine them. Oath of the Crown provides a similar effect If your player is interested in playing a style where they focus on defending others you may be interested in the Oath of the Crown Paladin from Sword Coast Adventure's Guide. At 7th level they gain Divine ...



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