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-2

This looks interesting: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gwlJEh8hI63FzppPtbjpOeaxhbNuDENvWl4uowgq9RM/edit Also includes guides for AD&D 2, D&D 3/3.5, and Pathfinder.


1

You probably don't have control over this, but Bracers of Defense are a magic item which give +2 AC when not using armor or a shield.


3

Lay on Hands is not normally used for an attack, and isn't an attack. It's an ability you can use when you can literally lay your hands onto a creature. You can argue it into an "attack" several ways, but all such arguments are trying to rely on strict rules for this corner case in a game that doesn't have strict rules for corner cases; a game that instead ...


1

Lay On Hands isn't an attack... It is merely an action that let's you restore HP or remove specific conditions. There is no language about it healing or damaging certain types of creatures as channel divinity had in various versions of the playtest. As written Lay on Hands simply effects the target if you trigger it in range.


10

Touch = Melee range for all intents and porpoises. It does not tell you about what the power's attack roll/saving throw/action is. The text of the Lay On Hands ability states: As an action, you can touch a creature and draw power from the pool to restore a number of hit points to that creature, up to the maximum amount remaining in your pool. ...


7

Straight Ability increases are your hands-down best way to increase AC as a monk. Your Martial Arts class feature depends on being unarmored and Unarmored Movement only works if you are unarmored as well. You start out with no armor proficiencies so you would need to invest a feat to wear light armor anyway, whereas by increasing both Dex and Wis by 1 ...


-4

House Rule: 2nd Level Lesser Restoration removes 1 level of exhaustion. Easy.


3

I've scoured the PHB, DMG and MM and can say with some confidence there is no RAW for this in the currently-published core rulebooks. The DMG gets tantalizingly close in its rules for flying mounts on DMG 119, but that's not your question. The designers of 5e D&D have deliberately not dotted every i and crossed every t, and leave such points precisely ...


1

At first I would say that this usage of Inspiration is ok, but with more thinking I find that Inspiration is something that you can do to alter your own actions, hence I'm inspired I perform better at my actions, I can influence the outcome of this because I have control of the situation but, how do I influence with my inspiration other being's action? How ...


14

Proceed with Caution, you are entering dangerous territory. Expanding inspiration in this manner will make it more powerful (by definition). Adding dramatically more options to any ability will do this. There are also some soft differences between granting success versus granting failure. All party members succeeding once will have a very different feel ...


6

Spot has been replaced by a combination of Perception and Investigation. Perception is for noticing things about you, people sneaking up and such. Investigation is for searching for things in a room or researching things. Swim is covered by Athletics. Move Silently is now covered by Stealth skill. Everyone is capable of performing each skill. If you ...


7

Yes, this is fine. You seem to have noticed an inherent symmetry in how aggressive spells work — a spell will either: requires an attack roll to hit or requires a saving throw to avoid the effect But never both. Since the rules say you can use Inspiration to get advantage on the first kind of spell, it only seems balanced to be able to use ...


3

I would say that giving your opponent disadvantage compares reasonably with giving yourself advantage. (If I'm not mistaken) advantage/disadvantage works out to a +5/-5 bonus/penalty on average. If you're giving yourself a +5 to hit, save, or ability, giving an opponent a -5 to hit, save, or ability would be equally influential. Having said that, I think ...


4

If you're really interested in making this an important part of campaign flavor, you might want to take a page from 4E Darksun and the "Reckless breakage" option: Reckless Breakage: When you roll a natural 1 on an attack roll, your weapon has a chance to break. You can accept the result, automatically missing the attack as usual, but keeping your weapon ...


-1

Battle Master level seven feature, Know Your Enemy. That said, I play with open HP and, especially, open AC.


4

Give the weapon bonuses or advantage on things other than To Hit and Damage. For example, this weapon has a very well-made grip. You have advantage on checks to resist disarming. For example, this weapon has hooks that aid in climbing. You have advantage on climbing rolls (including climbing on to larger creatures). For example, this weapon is covered in ...


-1

If you're up for it, there are rules about objects and their hit points. (In the PHB, they mention such for boats; in the Hoard of Dragons, they have a couple of doors with HP...) For example, you could say a door has 50 hp and to break it you need an ax and hit it until you generate 50 hp of damage. Not too important if you are not in a combat situation, ...


3

The only way I see to do that RAW is by treating these Dwarven weapons as magical. Possible minor properties such as Gleaming and Unbreakable might make thematic sense in this instance.


12

All the things which in real life denote "superior craftsmanship" are not really made into mechanics, in 5E, outside of describing the weapon as "better made". That said, you have some options: Saves and Breakage It's pretty rare that objects have to make saving throws in D&D in general, but sometimes stuff like acid, intense heat, or rust monsters ...


8

They did away with Masterwork items in 5e. So we are into house rule territory. In which you could import the old Masterwork effect: +1 to hit but not to damage (compared to a magic +1, which does both). Or you could just fluff it and say - sword looks particular well, compare to other works of swords. Fluff also means it doesn't carry any mechanical ...


0

A torch also counts as a simple weapon, and most like a club as you mentioned. Anything you can pickup can be an improvised weapon, but things that approximate simple weapons can be wielded with proficiency if you have proficiency in simple weapons. Therefore the torch, lit or unlit could be wielded as a club, and a lot torch would add 1hp of Fire damage. In ...


4

RAW interpretation: Torches would deal 1d4 unlit as an improvised weapon and only 1 lit as per torch description, specific overrules general. A reason for this by RAW could be it's burning, twigs and sticks that are alight are brittle and fall apart at the softest touch. Rules as Intended/Logic Torches are usually a bunch of reeds, sticks, cloth ...


1

This came up recently in our 5e game too. I ruled it as 1d4 bludgeoning +1 fire. In my specific case it was against spider webs, so the difference in damage types mattered. Not sure if that's the actual intended ruling but it made sense to us.


-5

Now I have not played 5e and I am not really an all experienced DM. But I normally play with the rules that if you hit an enemy with a torch, it deals, in the way you have put on there. 1D4 damage. but also burning damage as well (I think its normally 1d6 in 3.5e) Depending on the enemies clothing as well, I roll a D100 to see if the item of clothing is ...


6

The creatures act on their initiative, just like everyone else. This can lead to them acting in the round they were summoned, or not. Allow me to illustrate, with the thrilling tale of Dave the Druid and Bob the Barbarian, who were larking around in a swimming pool when Bob said something about Dave's mother: A fight breaks out between Dave the Druid and ...


7

Yes, the Wyvern is probably intended to have disadvantage. While Word of God could always overturn this, it seems pretty clear that the intent is for this to apply to reach attacks. They have the key phrase "ranged attack" and use it elsewhere in the rules (e.g. in the Monk's deflect arrows ability). This heavily implies that the more awkward wording is ...


1

The Patron can certainly do so-- by killing the character. The patron has no explicit extra supernatural ability to do so within the rules and (even in a soul trade, if that's what happened) devils typically ask for things later (i.e. at the time of your death or contingent on some specific other thing the purchaser expects never to allow to happen). The ...


4

Already covered RAW, powers are not able to be stripped, as there is no class that can lose powers save the paladin, who's powers change form when he becomes an Oathbreaker. Lore states that it could be a good story hook, allowing for a very interesting story line that leads to all the things that were mentioned in the original question. Also Consider ...


3

It depends on the pact. While Theik is right about being part of the story/background of the warlock as opposed to a hard and fast. The designer did include an implied setting along with several options. The section on Sworn and Beholden reveals that the warlock abilities is based on a pact. A formal agreement between two parties. As it is an agreement than ...


6

From a purely RAW perspective, this is a pretty clear "no," as there isn't a rule saying that a warlock can lose their powers this way. It's even supported somewhat in the class description, where it says that warlocks who go around fighting against their patrons' influence in the world are good heroic concepts. But there's still a lot of leeway the DM has ...


14

As Miniman points out, you cannot grapple as an attack of opportunity because an AoO does not give you an attack action. However, your situation doesn't actually call for an attack of opportunity. Instead, it sounds like you had readied an action. From Basic Rules page 72: Sometimes you want to get the jump on a foe or wait for a particular ...


5

You've already quoted the important distinction. A grapple requires you to use the Attack action, which an opportunity attack does not give you. Your DM is free to rule that you can do this, but they have already ruled that you can't, so that seems unlikely. As far as RAI are concerned, we can only speculate, but the writers of 5e have been extremely ...


-1

While actually wielding a two-handed weapon, or a weapon and a shield, you normally won't be able to cast spells with somatic components. However, in the two-handed case, you can release the grip on the weapon with one hand in order to cast. After all, unless you're super-weak, you'll be able to hold the thing with one hand - just not attack with it like ...


8

You can't cast spells while holding your two-handed sword or your sword and shield without the War Caster feat. This is spelled out on page 203 of the PHB: If a spell requires a somatic component, the caster must have free use of at least one hand to perform these gestures. However, you don't necessarily need to take the feat in order to use a ...


10

Yes, but the game doesn't tell you which. As long as your Druid isn't a newborn baby, they've likely seen some beasts in their life (especially during and after their Druid training!), and therefore can Wild Shape into those beasts. Your background is probably the best guide to what creatures you've likely seen, as your background will imply a region ...


9

In the PHB we have the following rules concerning a size difference of two or more: You cannot move through a hostile creature's space unless it is two or more sizes bigger than you. (PHB 191, Player's Basic Rules 71) You can drag or carry a grappled creature but your speed is halved unless the creature is two or more sizes smaller than you. (PHB 195) ...


2

No, size does not affect attacks. It's possible that the restriction that you're thinking of is that you cannot grapple or shove a creature 2 sizes larger than yourself. There are a number of other exceptions around size, but none that affect regular attacks. The primary rules on creature size in combat are on page 71 of the Player's Basic Rules.


-1

1Sorcerer/2 Paladin/4 Warlock/6 Paladin/7 Sorcerer Human Varient 8 Str/16 Dex/14 Con/8 Int/10 Wis/16 Cha Arcane Focus/Holy Shield : AC: 13 + Dex : 16 + 2 shield = 18 AC @ Level 1 Feat: Polearm Mastery 1: Sorcerer Origin: Draconic (Gold/Fire) / Draconic Resilience 3: Smites/Dueling Combat Style 4: The Fiend 5: Agonizing Blast/Devil's Sight 6: Tome: ...


24

Cunning Action absolutely does let you Dash again, but Dash doesn't work quite like you're remembering (PHB, p. 192): When you take the Dash action, you gain extra movement for the current turn. The increase equals your speed, after applying any modifiers. So it's not multiplying your speed, it's adding your speed to your speed. With only one Dash, ...


0

The Arcane Trickster is an Archetype. When you level up, you still take levels as a Rogue, and the Arcane Trickster features scale up as you gain levels in the Rogue class. It is not its own class, so it doesn't need to have the same stuff a class has. So when you need to reference your Proficiency Bonus as an Arcane Trickster or an Eldritch Knight, you ...


1

There is no proficiency bonus listed in that chart because it is listed with the main rogue chart. The same is true of the eldritch knight archtype of the fighter class. As an aside proficiency bonuses dont really need to be listed with eaxh class because it is completely dependent on character level not class level. I.e. a fighter5/rogue5 has the same ...


9

The rule says you add your proficiency bonus to spell attack rolls, so you do. It's not missing from the table, it's just in another table on page 95, along with all the other core Rogue numbers. Spellcasters usually have spells as a core feature and they have all their level-based numbers in one table (see the Sorcerer just a few pages further on, on page ...


-4

We ruled it like this: Barkskin replace your armor (Leather, Chain, Plate..) And your AC is 16+Dex Bonus + Shield + Ring of Protection, whatever. Keep in mind, it's an concentration spell. So, you wont cast it on the whole party. And the rules dont say your AC IS 16. It says your AC cant be less than 16, means it can be higher. Our Sorcerer has with the ...


13

There are no general rules for ability damage, almost certainly because ability damage in 5e is incredibly rare. With that said, there are some sources of ability damage, so it's worth taking a look at them. The following effects are the only sources of ability damage I can find: The Intellect Devourer's Devour Intellect ability, which can reduce a ...


8

This is actually an intentional strategy on the part of WOTC. Obviously we don't have full insight into everything they are thinking, but Mearls did talk a good bit about the intended release schedule in the run up to the release of the edition. Honestly, I think our current plan fits my ideal pretty well. It was also driven by the data we collected as ...


22

Does Armor Stack? In general, there are two notations for AC: The most common variety sets your AC to a fixed value, and looks something like this: AC = 11 + Dex Modifier (Padded armor) Your AC equals 10 + your Dexterity modifier + your Wisdom modifier (Monk Unarmored Defense class feature) Alternately, some items increase your existing AC, ...


5

Bracers of Defence (DMG Pg 156) While wearing these bracers, you gain a +2 bonus to AC if you are wearing no armor and using no shield. Plate (PHB Pg 145) Plate consists of shaped, interlocking metal plates to cover the entire body. A suit of plate includes gauntlets, heavy leather boots, a visored helmet, and thick layers of padding ...


3

Yes, there are rules for this. Armour does one of two things: it either tells you what your new AC is, or it gives you a +X AC bonus. When a piece of armour just tells you what your AC is, they are not additive. Only when an item gives a bonus to AC can it be added to the AC provided by other items.


8

Even if you look at it from the 5e mechanical/descriptive perspective, there are easy reasons to stick with golem creation rather than an undead army. The first is control. You can only control so many undead before they start to lose it and attack people. This is evidenced by the necessity of constantly recasting the spell to retain control over them. ...


3

RAW certainly doesn't say one way or the other, thus leaving it to DMs Judgement (DMJ). However the sources and language cited strongly imply bridging large horizontal distances. I'd invoke the Olympics as an example: long jump versus high jump. You'll note that both events use various surfaces to land on. Sand in one case, and a large poofy pad in the ...



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