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47

History D&D started as a series of little booklets, now called "original D&D" (OD&D). These booklets were basically barely-edited versions of the house rules of Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson. In 1977, TSR hired J. Eric Holmes to develop a Basic D&D game. This was a dark blue, boxed set containing D&D in a single book, plus a module (B1 ...


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Remember that encumbrance is limited, and it determines movement rate. That 100-cn difference between chainmail and plate armors is equivalent in encumbrance to an entire week of food, or 200 arrows. Extra ammo or faster movement may make the difference between success and failure in an adventure. Be 10% better protected in the occasional fights that ...


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One of the biggest reasons for wearing Chain Mail was the price. Since starting cash was random, at first level, you might not even have enough cash to buy Chain Mail without borrowing from your friends. Once you had the cash for Plate, there'd be little reason to go back. Also, as others have said, some classes were limited specifically to chain (the ...


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I think the Role Playing consequences of wearing plate armour greatly outweigh any game mechanics. Depending on where you are if you wonder about a town wearing a suit of full plate then people are going to think that you are ready for a fight, heck it takes half an hour to get into the stuff. Chainmail, especially a chain shirt can be slipped on like a ...


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BX doesn't put the same weight on the ability scores as you appear to, so beware that adding an ability score advancement mechanic will redirect some of your players motivations away from looking for harder-to-achieve bonuses to their effectiveness. On the other hand, you don't have to worry much about breaking the balance of the game with this, because ...


7

The Challenger Series more of a generic category for products designed for use with the Rules Cyclopedia. My guess is that the reason for the terminology is because the books were an alternative/supplement to the Entry Level products that were used with the boxed D&D beginner's set. [source] I believe this to be a comprehensive list of all Challenger ...


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There is little game mechanic reasons for one or the other ... but in real life there was a world of difference. Plate is hot to wear and restrictive of your movement; imagine going to the loo. Most people required servants to help them put it on correctly and to get on and off a horse. Chain is more bendy, and you can wear it for longer periods, and it's ...


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Yes, there is a specific retro-clone geared towards BECMI gaming....it is called Dark Dungeons and it is a replication of the one-book D&D Rules Cyclopedia! This would appear to be exactly what you are looking for: http://darkdungeonsblog.wordpress.com/ You might also look at games that replicate Basic D&D, such as Labyrinth Lord or BFRPG


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1973: woodgrain box D&D. 1974-76: supplements come out for D&D 1977: Holmes collates the "basic" set, incorporating much of Supplements 1 & 2 into the rules. White editions of original rules sold as "Classic D&D", AD&D announced. 1979: AD&D starts to be released, with the PH, based firmly in Holmes' work. 1981: Moldvay simplifies the ...


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There are numerous minor wording changes, and a few more important changes. The biggest is that the Basic Set's "1d6 damage for everything" option is gone. There are minor changes to a few modifiers. The attack ranks and fighter option for high-experience demihumans are on the class's XP table, making it easier to implement them. General Skills are ...


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BECM were developed from OD&D (1974) and Moldvay/Cook Basic/Expert (1981-82), omitting various AD&D (1e) traits and expanding the original D&D game as a separate rules set. The series added many new campaign details (Dominions, the War Machine mass combat model, etc.) previously only minimally addressed by Perren (in the original 1970 Chainmail) ...


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As a GM, do you think in percentages? If so, and if you're going to tweak in LFP, then skip the d12 and jump to the d20. That makes it much easier to award bonuses & penalties in 5% increments. When that 1/6 is downshifted to 3/20 the difference is miniscule (1.6%)... or what the heck, tilt it in the player's favor (4/20); it won't change the game. ;>


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Come on people...the dice! Adam mentions that the Holmes version came with chits instead of dice after a while. When it came with chits, it also came with a coupon for a set of polyhedra. These were terrible, soft, twisted and awesome! The white d20 would turn pretty spherical and roll forever after a year or so of play. The blue d12 was as soft as ...


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Absolutely. There are a number of websites out there that still publish modules, monsters and content of classic D&D. Most refer to it as OSR - Old School Role-playing. Here are 2 sites to get you started: Dragons Foot: A lot of content here especially modules and creatures. The Mad Irishman: This site has great replicas of the original character ...


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A d12 skill system can be very elegant. See for instance Lord Kilgore's direct translation of the thief skill progression to d12. http://www.lordkilgore.com/labyrinth-lord-d12-thief-skills My ref uses a roll-high d12. Add your skill bonus to your roll; if the total is 12 or higher it's a success. E.g. with a +1 bonus you must roll 11 or 12, so 1/6 chance. ...


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When I'm running an old-school game, none of those d6 rolls are made by my players, to better preserve the players' ignorance of things that their characters don't know, such as a missed Find Secret Doors roll or even the fact that such a roll happened. In this tradition, rolling dice for these things is more like a private Oracle for what situations the DM ...


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A significant portion of the appeal of the original version of D&D were the inconsistent rules - which led to players developing their own in-house rules and distinctions in cases such as the Chainmail vs. Plate-Armor choice. There were custom class specializations (for example, allowing the magic user to wear armor, or imposing more restrictions on ...


2

In addition to all of the above plus the simple 1 per 4 levels of the d20 OGL you might look at a game called Chronicles of Ramalar. It had a system called Demeanor and Theme which each character had four circles with 12 dots around them. A goal was written in each circle and every time the character did something to advance to that goal a dot was colored ...


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Often, groups I've played with used the "whenever the DM feels like it" house rule. Frequently this was done in conjunction with one of several guidelines: As part of a finished quest: This could be a major milestone for the party as a whole (much like an XP reward) or when a character completes a specific, personal undertaking. Such a personal quest may ...


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There are none, but it's possible that you don't actually need to increase scores. As far back as his proto-D&D Blackmoor campaign, Dave Arneson used a method where he would roll from two to five d6 (depending on the difficulty of the task) and roll under some relevant characteristic, plus 1 point for every two character levels. So if you were a ...


1

The Simple Answer: From level 2-10: Every even level: +1 to ability of player's choice. From level 11-30: Every 4th level (i.e. 16, 20, 24, 28) Given that you're avoiding magical-items, it might be advisable to have some extra ability bumps. Although I'm not familiar with 'Basic Fantasy', it might be best to increase monster-stats slightly to maintain ...


1

Okay, going by the amazon reviews here, the wikipedia entry here, and the retroroleplaying's page on it here, it appears that the rules are overall the same, but that at least some editing was done to compile the sources. This would mean that the box set would have superseded rules.


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I have a partial list of OSR publishers that support all varieties of older D&D (OD&D, B/X, BECMI, 1st AD&D mostly). http://www.batintheattic.com/oldschoolsurvey.htm The big three are OSRIC (AD&D 1st), Labyrinth Lords (B/X), and Swords & Wizardry (Original D&D) Swords & Wizardry Core rules is the most used for a heavily house ...


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Looking over the Specialist Rules I don't see going with a d12 and doubling the granted skill bonus would make much of a difference. The reason why is that there is only Nine abilities to spend points among. If you play into the high teens you are going to have most of them maxed out. Unlike the +2 jump in Fighter to Hit that some D&D variants have you ...


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Just adding to the excellent answers, it appears Holmes D&D was really more a continuation of OD&D than any sort of intro to the emerging Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Holmes D&D is really almost a complete game in itself, separate from anything else ever published at TSR. Although continuations of Holmes' Blue book to higher levels can be ...



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