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69

All this does is linearly adjust the normally-flat 5% probability for each number to occur. What results is a increased or decreased probability of any number above or below average to occur, positively for advantage and negatively for disadvantage. See this AnyDice function set, which yields the following: Black is d20, orange is highest of 2d20, blue is ...


26

You Should Be Dead, But... Save-or-die mechanics are pretty awful for straight-up challenges. I mean, you wouldn't exactly get a lot of tactical thrills from a game that boils down to "Flip a coin to see if you lose," would you? But that's not the only way they've been used. Practices and opinions vary pretty widely in the OD&D/OSR community, but one ...


20

A rogue could perhaps play solo. But only if she devoted herself to stealth and avoided all out combat at all costs. D&D is a very much a party based game. And it's best played with a table full of friends, each with their own character. But at the same time, occasionally circumstances require something less than that ideal. There are two options. Go ...


18

The mean result goes from 10.5 to 7.175 for disadvantage and to 13.825 for advantage. The odds go from a flat 5% for each of 1 through 20 to (disadvantage results shown; reverse the first column for advantage results): 1 39 9.75% 2 37 9.25% 3 35 8.75% 4 33 8.25% 5 31 7.75% 6 29 7.25% 7 27 6.75% 8 25 6.25% 9 23 5.75% 10 21 5.25% 11 19 ...


18

This is outside the current scope of the playtest from what I've seen of it. That means that there is no rule to govern it. However, generally in D&D the kinds of simulation aspects you've asked about are governed by attack and damage penalties. In D&D 4e's math scheme, this would be modeled with a -2 penalty to attacks with no penalty to damage ...


15

Yes. The New York Times revealed on January 9, 2012 that a 5th edition of D&D was in the works for a release at Gen Con 2013. Mike Mearls confirmed it shortly thereafter. An open playtest for the game began on May 25, 2012.


14

Advanced D&D 1st edition: Hit points and AC ranges for "typical" 1st level PCs Fighter: 1-14 HP (1d10, max +4 for CON) AC 4 to -1 (Splinted Mail+Shield, 6-18 DEX) Thief: 1-8 HP (1d6, max +2 for CON), AC 8 to 4 (Leather, 9-18 DEX) Magic-User: 1-6 HP (1d4, max +2 for CON), AC 11 to 6 (No armor, 6-18 DEX) Then there's the Goblin: 1-7 HP, AC 6, damage 1d6 ...


14

It appears that you have conflicting interests: a lack of permanent character death, but a real threat of death which involves real problems. There are no obvious ways to reconcile these two points. An easy way out of permanent character death reduces the problems associated with dying, and having a god decide to resurrect a player seems too much like Deus ...


13

The math is straightforward With an advantage you are looking for best of two results. To figure out your odds you need to multiply the chance of FAILURE together to find out the new chance of failure. For example if you need 11+ to hit rolling two dice and taking the best means instead of a 50% of failing you have only a 25% chance of failing (.5 times ...


13

Eh, a dedicated meat shield isn't necessary anyway. If you're fighting in an open area, and there's someone behind the guy with the armor shooting spells at you, why wouldn't you go take him out? Ranged attackers could just shoot over the meat shield directly of course, but a group of melee folks could simply run around. One meat shield can't stop that ...


13

To preserve the probabilities exactly, the new DC should be "14 + monster defense." How I got that number So, you want to convert this: d20 + monster_save vs. 8 + caster_modifiers Into this: d20 + caster_modifiers vs. ?? + monster_save Here's how to figure out the "??" using a bit of intuition about probability: Ignore the modifiers for a ...


12

I've run plenty of solo adventures before, both with sidekick characters and with the player on their own. There are several key factors I've found when running solo adventures that make them more enjoyable Pander to what the player likes as much as possible; that isn't to say you make everything a cakewalk - far from it. What you need to do is find what ...


12

I'm going to cover 4e and Next in this answer. 4e first: Assumptions: For ease I will use Essentials classes. Mage HP: 23, AC: 14 (CON 13, INT 18) Surge value: 5 (28 HP) Knight HP: 31 AC: 20 (CON 16, Plate, Heavy Shield) Surge Value: 7 (38 HP) Thief HP: 25 AC: 16 (CON 13, DEX 18, Leather) Surge Value 6 (31 HP) Goblins and Kobolds (No L1 non-minion ...


12

To be honest, this shouldn't matter much in Next. My impression of Next from running a couple of fairly early playtest packets was that by the time the design was fairly mature, they had made combat very costly. Generally what you'll want to do is let this party focus on skulking and intrigue, as you've done. Combat should be the skirmish sort and this ...


11

In the current 5E playtest, there is no flanking. In fact, there are few rules for combat at all, and definitely no rules for grid-based combat and positioning. As stated elsewhere, the playtest doesn't represent the final ruleset, so positioning rules may be added later on, but for now, granting advantage is merely a judgement call. Personally, I would say ...


11

WotC includes all (publicly available) rules in their playtest packets, so if it's not in the playtest packet then there are no rules for it at the moment. As of Feb 28, 2013 no rules for multi-classing in DnD Next have been released. Update: Here is a summary of the multiclassing rules as of the final playtest packet. Multiclassing is similar to 3rd ...


11

Since you mentioned mage spells, I will answer in a mage's perspective. In short: Use more cantrips, and adapt to the situation. Most of all, cooperate. Use more cantrips 1. How can a mage learn new cantrips after character creation? Since cantrips are spells, and the mage can add two new spells to his or her spellbook each level, a mage can ...


10

I think its pretty clear what the intent was -- there are two effects: A -2 penalty on both rolls the stipulation that "you use only the light weapon’s damage dice to determine its damage; you add no bonuses to it" The latter can be described as a limit, but the former probably wouldn't be. Anyway, make sure to give them feedback on the wording!


9

On page 3 of Character Creation it states, that the spell casting bonus applies to two things: The Spell DC for the spell (you add this to your stat and 10 and get the DC) The attack from the spell. If the spell makes an attack you add this to the attack roll. The melee/ranged attack modifier also only applies to the to-hit. It does not apply to the ...


9

4e Con is a useful stat for fighters, and as heavy armor users they can afford to grab a 14. Rogues are all about Dex, so they too can afford to diversify a little bit to get a 12 Con. Wizard1 is a staff-wielder, so he has a 14 Con. Wizard2 is going orbs, so he has a 10 Con. We'll assume each spends 1 healing surge (presumably through 2nd wind, but ...


9

1d6+3 Finesse. When making an attack with a finesse weapon, you can use your choice of your Strength or Dexterity modifier with your attack and damage rolls. - Equipment Rules, P. 4 Any attack made with a weapon that has the finesse keyword lets you use either STR for attack and damage modifiers or DEX for attack and damage modifiers.


9

No, that sounds fun and flavourful. I'm picturing Vikings at the moment because it fits really well, but it would be a neat detail for all kinds of made-up cultures. There will be published adventures that will go contrary to these expectations, and you'll either have to not use them or spend time adjusting them to fit into your setting better. The big ...


8

Obviously since there's only 31 pages of D&D Next rules, these are the kinds of interpretations that have to be informed by earlier editions and DM fiat. Usually "there's a bugbear in the trees" is not sufficient to avoid a sneak attack because the others still don't know exactly where it is. It certainly might allow them a second Wisdom check to spot ...


8

3.5 (I'm adding another answer rather than editing my existing one because my existing answer is already pretty darn long). I'll be assuming the maximum value for the level 1 hit die; this was a common house rule, and I believe was also the official rule in many of the organized play leagues. Let's give the fighter a +1 Dex mod (he's going for plate), a ...


8

"The world is cruel. And the only morality in a cruel world is chance. Unbiased. Unprejudiced. Fair." You said it yourself in the question, your two goals are inherently at odds with one another. Save-or-Die effects are incompatible with attempting to tell a story where the characters only die at appropriate, dramatic moments. Any neutering of death in ...


7

Here I present the answer as of January, 2014: Yes, the rules for multiclassing debuted in the playtest packet released at Sep. 19, 2013, which is the final playtest packet. In these rules, multiclassing requires you to have sufficient ability score for the class to dip in. (Specialties such as magic-user or mystical healer are cut off, by the way. You have ...


7

Basic D&D Fighter: 7.5 HP (1d8+CON), AC 2 (Plate+shield) Thief: 2.5 HP(1d4), AC 4 (Leather, -3 DEX bonus) Magic-User: 2.5 HP(1d4), AC 9 (No armor, no DEX bonus) Goblin: HD 1-1, avg. dam 3.5 Rounds to kill: Fighter: 2.14 hits, 17 to hit = 10.7 rounds Thief: 0.71 hits, 15 to hit = 2.37 rounds Magic-User: 0.71 hits, 10 to hit = 1.29 rounds


7

Being a playtester DM I've spent some time to make a list of all the things that grant advantage and disadvantage within the current ruleset. The following things grant advantage to an attack roll: Hidden attacker Attacker being helped† Paralyzed target Prone target (melee attacks only) Restrained target Stunned target Unconscious target Unless you ...


7

I suspect medium armour is likely to be tagged to certain class restrictions, much like pathfinder clerics. There are also numerous other reasons listed in this question: (crucially weight and RP reasons) Why would chainmail be preferred over plate


7

You decide which cleric spells are available to you to cast. Whenever you complete a long rest, you prepare the list of cleric spells that you can cast of 1st level or higher, choosing from the list of spells available to all clerics (see the “Spells” document). You decide which mage spells are available to you to cast each day. After completing a ...



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