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15

Why does it ruin everything? If the GM caused the fall then re-stack and pre-pull the same as if a player had. If at any time a player other than the host causes the collapse of the tower, their character is removed from the game. This implies to me that if the host causes the collapse then nothing much happens, just re-stack and pre-pull the correct ...


8

It tends not to happen. Even conservative players will probably pull, if only because Jenga is fun. However, if you do run into someone who won't, try not to force them early on. As is mentioned by @SevenSidedDie, they will become cowardly and pitiful, and that is an interesting story. Think about the story of the guy who watches while his friends die, and ...


7

I haven't played the published scenario in Dread, but I have played my share of original games. This question is somewhat hard to answer, as anyone can make any kind of "mistake", but here are somethings I'd advise you to keep in mind: Kill 'em - If someone knocks it over, don't take it back or try to "soften the blow" people need to die. Watch the pace - ...


7

You might fill about a character questionnaire at the start of the game, but that's about all the writing you're likely to do, unless you like to take notes. There is no need for dice or books of any kind. Dread is about as light as games get. There's pretty much nothing you can do to prepare for it, except practice at home with your Jenga set.


7

The players win! Whatever the dread threat is loses this time, and they don't all die. Woot! In Dread, pacing is already heavily dependent on chance and other people - they can have 4 collapses in the first hour and game's over. So playing Dread, like any board game, you have to roll with the pacing and be ready to start a new one a lot, so this doesn't ...


7

If you and your players all happen to have Android phones you could try using the Multiplayer Online Jenga App for Android. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.naturalmotion.j3n64&hl=en I'm not sure if there is an iPhone version for those with iPhones (and even if there is, you may find the two version don't play well together if you have ...


6

I play quite a lot of Dread, and I really love the tension and the flow of the game. As @Graham mentions- You have to let them die It isn't the right kind of horror if bodies aren't dropping. However, what you can do is control the pacing of the story and the number of pulls. In every game of Dread I've played the GM leads with a slow buildup. You can set ...


6

I think your concerns are mostly valid. Before addressing them, I must admit I'm biased towards using Call of Cthulhu for Delta Green (after all, that's the system DG was designed for, and it's anything but complex), and am not a fan of Dread, seeing it as a game in which a player's (not character's!) physical capabilities play a significant role, upsetting ...


5

There is a sequel game to Dread called Dread House, "a game for kids and brave adults". In Dread House, if the tower falls, the player's PC runs away but the player then plays one of the monsters in the haunted house. Depending on the horror going on in your game, consider letting an eliminated Dread player in on the GM's story and secrets or allow some ...


5

I would be quick to offer elective pulls often if this is a first time group. As the quote says, suggesting an elective pull alerts the player that something is wrong. Sometimes its a good idea to prevent "gotcha" type effects, but sometimes it makes the game way to easy for the players (or can lead to a very strange death that is rather meaningless). With a ...


4

You absolutely can--I think the best games of Dread I've played all had 2-4 players--but it affects game length and tension in very computable ways. The game gets much slower with fewer people, so it extends the story and the GM can't come out swinging right away. More like Japanese horror than a slasher, if you like. This suited our group's needs, as it ...


3

A few things come to mind when I think of the Jenga tower: 1) When the tower pitches over, that's it. The end result is something catastrophic and final. For a D&D game, you would need to include a powerful and irreversible consequence to reaching the end of the line, whether it be a curse, or one or more PCs' deaths. 2) The worsening situation is ...


3

Pencil and paper might be helpful, but you shouldn't need dice. Dread uses a tower of balanced wooden blocks as its resolution mechanic; to succeed, you'll need to pull a block from the tower without it collapsing.


2

I would re-stack and then make as many pulls (being fair about it) as were made on the previous tower. If I was being especially sheepish, I might even leave an extra block or three in, but that might mess with your pacing.


2

In practice, I'd choose one of the following two options: Restack the tower and pre-pull, as per the rules. Restack the tower and don't pre-pull, because it takes time, and hell, let's just get on with it. But there's another consideration. In Dread, the tower collapsing feels important. When a player collapses the tower, there's been a death. Thus, ...


2

.You could play with only 2 players, but part of the appeal of the dread system is that it mirrors horror films where the level of tension and violence escalates as people are picked off one by one. The mechanic of pulling more tiles for each player dead seems to encourage a group of the size they recommend. Likewise, dead players aren't supposed to "chat" ...


2

If it happens on their first or second pull, just give them another chance. Cheat the rules. But, really, dying is part of the fun. It's slasher horror: you want people to die. Let them hang around and watch, but let them die. (Don't underestimate how much fun Dread is to watch.)


2

A good way to build tension is to have characters working against a clock (in this case represented by the tower). My first thought is, unlike Dread, where the tower always falls eventually, give the party a chance to "win" the tower (reset) by accomplishing whatever task is at hand. You would need to carefully plan how to set up the encounters to get the ...


1

I think the 2 ultimate questions are "When do i want the players to pull from the tower, and what impact will a falling tower have?" Should a player have to pull every time they do a skill roll? Should a player have to pull every time they attack? It really depends on how you want to do it. I think i would have them pull every time they roll the dice. ...



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