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41

Your player loves the setting, but this is blinding them to what the books actually are: casefiles. They're not true, they're what the writer believes is true. The Dresdenverse is much more complicated than even Harry Dresden knows. If your player truly loves the setting, they should embrace that fact. On page 26 of Our World, at the end of the chapter ...


38

Yes. The books never explicitly say that the GM should or must tell the players the difficulty, but that's because it takes it for granted. (It really should say, because – as you point out – keeping players in the dark is just so normal for so many GMs.) There is circumstantial evidence in the text that the GM is supposed to set difficulties "in the ...


31

See DFRPG: p.200 for Attacks p.207 for Maneuvers Whenever you attack someone, you choose the appropriate Skill to roll - Fists for punches, Weapons for knives/swords, Guns for guns, etc.. Roll 4dF (the 4 Fudge dice) and add the result of the roll, which will be between -4 and +4 to the Skill you chose. The defender gets to make a defense roll with an ...


28

Player Revolt/Intervention You must, in an out-of-character context, talk about this with your GM. There is no rule in the world that will solve player favoritism. This conversation needs to include, bluntly That this behavior is making the game unfun for you That this behavior is making the game unfun for your table-mates That the behavior must end ...


26

Write out a starter set of "power cards" on index cards, formatted somewhat like the D&D 4e power cards for familiarity. They can have some normal FATE combat options, and also some tailored to her Aspects - you can make these up yourself, or based on things you've heard her say she'd think her character could do. After each combat, tell he she ...


25

First off, DFRPG is full of "the group should agree" (YS92), "keep in mind the intended play style" (YS31), "make sure your players are okay this" (YS338), "make sure you're on the same page as your players" (341), and "when in doubt, talk it through with your group" (YS99). In many places throughout this book, the phrase “the GM decides” is often used ...


24

“Cold iron” historically is just a poetic way of saying “iron.” Worked iron (including steel) is traditionally something that the fairy folk shy away from, and many fantasy works have embraced this—but each does it their own way. The Dresden Files universe is a very practical and down-to-earth place when it comes to magical reagents. In a world where magic ...


23

To me it sounds like your player is a mix of being impulsive and a newbie to roleplaying. The newbie elements (needing stuff explicitly explained and such) should work themselves out with time. The impulsiveness usually needs a little bit of work. Here's what I did once to rebuff the impulsive players in my campaign: Set up a wonderful campaign arc that ...


23

They give a very good impression of the setting, and they also give a pretty good background for understanding how the rules work. The game was designed to very closely emulate the fiction of the books (Evil Hat and the author worked closely together for about a decade, and much of Evil Hat's work on developing and refining Fate over the years and multiple ...


22

I would say this is bad practice. You've just had the players roll alertness when they should be rolling empathy. Say one of your characters has Empathy as a Superb skill. They get a huge bonus on the roll. Say they also have only an Average Alertness. You've just denied them a +4 on that roll and they don't even know it! (If they find out they will be ...


21

Style DFRPG is rather wordy; the manuals themselves are flavorful enough to give a solid sense of the Dresden Files world and its playful-yet-serious attitudes. Sadly, this occasionally obscures the rules a little, but overall it's very well written. Also, the book's got a lot of art. General Rules with Examples (35+ pages) FATE is a weird system for the ...


20

Ask her for her character's intentions. Then guide her through the game system towards the result she strives for. The FATE system is quite different than many other RPG engines, and the great amount of creative licence granted to players can be overwhelming for newcomers used to other game systems. Some hand holding may be necessary until they get used to ...


17

The reason for the White Court catch being 0, and not +1 or +2, I believe, is that True Love, like True Courage and True Hope (for the other varieties of White Court vampires) are exceptionally rare. You can't just get access to True Love, so even if you know about that particular Catch, there's not necessarily anything that you can do about it.


17

Stress tracks in FATE work as a pacing mechanism. It's not meant to simulate the physiological reaction of a body to punishment; it's there to provide a means of determining whether a character is out of the fight or not and reproduce a narrative aesthetic. Hit points historically have worked this way; the description of what a "hit point" is has often ...


17

It helps to first tell them that in a FATE game, the players are not their characters. Players are not much different than the GM in what they do, only that they usually have a limited jurisdiction (their character) and limited resources (their FATE points). Everybody at the table has control over how the story unfolds regarding their jurisdiction, and can ...


17

Baltimore is the most fully realized setting, The Dresden Files RPG books Your Story and Our World cover Baltimore fairly in-depth, with locations, aspects, NPCs, and plot hooks. Chicago is the default setting, But it's more covered in the novels than in the game, so although there's a lot of Chicago in the game manuals there's no proper setting bible ...


17

There's two ways to understand your question: as a request for example spells, or as a plea for help because you don't really know what Spirit does. There's no exhaustive list of example Spirit spells, and besides, working from a list of spells is the opposite of how the DFRPG magic system works. So I'm going to answer the latter interpretation of the ...


16

Attacking a character with high Athletics (or anything else) is pretty simple, as long as you don't simply try to beat it head-on. Simply put: use maneuvers that aren't opposed by Athletics. (Or, ideally, at all.) FATE is highly flexible, and gives you lots of room to work. Leverage your skills. There are lots of ways to turn scores in other skills ...


16

Wraith's answer is absolutely right: Fate is designed to be open and transparent, and revealing aspects is crucial to the players' mechanical viability in the narrative. Now, DFRPG itself occupies a rather peculiar niche in the Fate paradigm and its narrative style unfortunately led to a lot of engine philosophy being implied rather than stated. So I'm ...


16

FATE doesn't go for fiddly bits FATE, as I'm sure you've noticed, has narrative expendiency as its core philosopy. One result of this is that mechanics are pretty simple and don't have a lot of exceptions or fiddly bits hanging off. So when the book describes one Court as stronger than another, that's primarily a narrative distinction, not something that ...


15

If you have high Conviction and low Discipline, you're a lot like Harry Dresden! I've been running a DFRPG campaign for several months now, we've completed one "novel" and we're in our second. So, I consider myself a pretty decent authority on this fairly young game. Here are some tips: You don't HAVE to gather as much power as your Conviction, you just ...


15

From Your Story, page 232: A Lawbreaker ability is a supernatural power (page 158) that reduces your refresh by one—you should sit up and take notice here. (Remember, if a character’s refresh ever drops to zero or below, he stops being a viable PC. He loses his free will, becoming a creature subservient to his nature, always acting in accordance ...


15

Yes, that is exactly the risk a character runs when they run out of fate points. Fate points represent a character's ability to modify... fate, or their free will. IF they don't have any fate points then they are locked into doing what their core character would do. This is the same as being an npc with 0 or less refresh, you are bound by your nature. It ...


15

Yes, you can offer a concession that kills you. From the glossary: Concession (Playing the Game, page 206): An alternative to being taken out in a conflict, wherein a player accepts defeat for his character (or the GM, for an NPC) in exchange for being able to dictate the terms of that defeat. Going further and checking out page 206: A ...


15

The book does answer this question, but in the margin on page 253. sigh… I love Evil Hat, but hiding this important rule here is rather… Evil. Thanks to the player that was trying to cast the reactive shield for finding it. Billy, Can you do Block evocations instead of rolling to defend? How about counterspells? As written, no—although your group ...


15

Play a session or two of Roll For Shoes. Like an improv exercise, it will shake out your narrative muscles and make you stretch them a bit in a gaming context where it's ok to do the "wrong" thing or take the game in absurd directions. This is the game that did the most to transition my old group from a D&D context to a more player-driven context. We ...


15

I think that one thing to refer him to (in the book appropriately titled Your Story) is the section on "Running the Game"YS306 . In the first part, "What the GM Does", this statement is a good starting place: Generally speaking, the GM is “where the buck stops” for any decisions about the game that come up during play—questions of setting and tone, ...


15

Stunts I would argue that this falls perfectly under the application of stunts - using one skill in place of another. From Your Story p.147: The first possible use for a stunt is to broaden a skill by giving it a new trapping. Often this is a trapping that’s “transplanted” from one skill to another. Sometimes this trapping may need to be modified, or ...


14

Was reading through and found this blurb on YS 106: The procedure to invoke an aspect that isn't on your character is precisely the same as a regular invocation: just declare how that aspect is relevant, spend a fate point, and take a +2 or a reroll. The only thing to keep in mind is that, if you're invoking an aspect on another PC or on a NPC ...


14

Yes. You can choose how an opponent gets taken out. That means you don't have to worry about accidentally violating the First Law. There are some complications in the moment. One is that any of your aspects that indicate bloodlust can be compelled so that you do kill them. The other is that what the consequences have to match the action you took. If you ...



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