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10

RAW-a helmet by itself is not armor in game terms. It doesn't appear on the armor list, and a helmet itself provides no change to a characters AC. Extrapolated from text and from the common understanding of helmet-A helmet is traditionally a piece of armor, and Druids don't encase their bodies in metal armor. I would rule that any metallic piece of ...


5

According to a dictionary: Armor, noun any covering worn as a defense against weapons. a suit of armor. a metallic sheathing or protective covering, especially metal plates, used on warships, armored vehicles, airplanes, and fortifications. mechanized units of military forces, as armored divisions. Also called armament. any protective ...


0

As far as I can tell, the rules are silent on whether a helmet alone is considered "armor". That means that this is a case where the DM has to exercise common sense. It could be argued that the intention of the rule is that Druids do not want to wear metal at all. That would include helmets. That said, I assume that there is some mechanical consideration ...


12

Let me reply to your question with a related question. My cleric worships Pelor, the god of goodness, healing, and the sun. What happens if my cleric wakes up at midnight and decides to draw runes in demon blood on his forehead and sacrifice a goat to Asmodeus? I think the answer to this question is pretty clear. According to the Rules As Written, ...


0

Armour is a specifically defined mechanic. The list of what is considered armour can be found on PH pages 144–145. Plate armour includes a helm, but none of the other armours list a helmet as part of the garb. Because druids are only restricted in the armour they wear (per PH65), they can wear magical hats, helms1, circlets, tiaras, and any other piece of ...


8

From page 65 of the PHB: Proficiencies Armor: Light armor, medium armor, shields (druids will not wear armor or use shields made of metal) So, RAW a druid will never choose to wear metal armor or use metal shields, so the main thrust of the question is based on a flawed premise. If a druid were forced to wear such items then, as soon as they were ...


3

Another role-play based answer is that the scimitar may not be available or even exist the the game world, as would be the case if your game world is Celtic based, remember that the scimitar was a weapon found predominantly in the Middle East/Asia IRL and would be completely foreign to anyone in the British Isles or France in the middle ages. The land the ...


11

It appears that they simply will not wear metal equipment. The PHB says they will not use metal equipment. It does not say that they are not proficient with it. From page 65 of the PHB: Proficiencies Armor: Light armor, medium armor, shields (druids will not wear armor or use shields made of metal) Since I can't find any mention of ...


22

Because it's Cool! Remember D&D is a role playing game first and a war game second. If the player imagines her Druid as a sickle wielding bad ass, reaping the foes of nature: fan-bloody-tastic. I am DMing a player whose gnome cleric dual wields daggers - mechanically she is giving up +2 AC from a shield or a 1d8 primary for the chance to do roughly the ...


7

He wouldn't, if he could help it A sickle is a simple weapon. A scimitar is a martial weapon. Strictly speaking, martial weapons are straight up better than simple weapons, role-playing aside. This is balanced by the fact that magic heavy classes tend to not have martial weapon proficiency, so they are limited by what types of weapons they can use. It ...


44

The shortest answer is, assuming the druid has the best-case scenario available to them, they wouldn't. The scimitar is all-around a better weapon than the sickle, assuming you're proficient in both (since the sickle is simple and the scimitar is martial, this is a reason why a character might wield the sickle instead, but doesn't apply to the druid). As a ...


9

The feat Wild Cohort provides no option for the wild cohort to have a template The benefit of the feat Wild Cohort says, in part, that You gain an animal cohort.... Provided the DM gives her approval, at 1st level you can choose from a badger, camel, dire rat, dog, riding dog, eagle, hawk, horse (light or heavy), owl, pony, snake (Small or Medium ...


12

Plant Growth There are two possible uses. If you cast this spell using 1 Action, ... all normal plants in a 100-foot radius become thick and overgrown. A creature moving through the area must spend 4 feet of movement for every 1 foot it moves..." Land's Stride "...moving through nonmagical difficult terrain costs you no extra movement. You can ...


9

The weapon attacks of a creature such as a Beast are 'Natural Weapons' and each entry for those attacks found under the Attack heading for each beast stat block tells you what kind of attack it is. For instance, a Claw and Bite attack count as a 'Melee Weapon Attack'. Nowhere in the description for these natural weapon attacks do they count as either ...


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Yes For the purposes of creature type you are a 'Beast' (or Elemental at L10) while in Wild Shape form and no longer Humanoid. As it has been pointed out to me by a fellow exchange friend, you are still yourself. Still a druid (with your memories and personality in tact). You never stop being who you are, but your form alters in such a all encompassing way ...



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