Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Say "Yes" The most important step to getting around single-solution obstacles is to say yes to your players when they ask if they can try something. They're going to propose their own solutions to their problems, and your job as GM isn't to decide what the right solution is - it's to determine how challenging the players' choice of solution is. Appeal to ...


0

When you're building a dungeon, you are designing a level for a game. A good starting place is to read articles and books about level design written by professional game developers. Here are some recommendations to get you started: Beginning Level Design, Part 1 Beginning Level Design, Part 2 Ten Principles of Good Level Design (Part 1) Ten Principles of ...


0

I got a one-shot idea which is very funny and require virtually no-prep (but you have to have some rulebook with typical enemies stats if you can't improvise them): The nightmare dungeon (of laziness +5) Basically the players enter a strange dungeon and you just set some very strange and intriguing elements. The truth is that they entered some kind of ...


1

TSR wrote a how-to book for 1st Edition AD&D back in the 1980's: The Dungeoneer's Survival Guide. It includes specific guidelines for creating dungeons, and guidelines for drawing them. It's available electronically. Most of the content is applicable to any edition of D&D; about 1/4 is specific to AD&D 1E, and only about 1/3 is actually rules ...


4

Two possibilities that come to mind are an article from a series by "The Architect DM" and the AD&D book "Dungeon Builder's Guidebook" by Bruce Cordell. The first of those two is a series of articles you can find on the Critical Hits blog with the specific article being found here. The other I bought many years ago, but Amazon appears to have links to ...


2

Any books I could find directly related to dungeon design were outdated/out of print. As such I'm going to give you general tips and advice for dungeon design. Take inspiration from other Media Think about Moria in LOTR or an ancient temple in any of the Indiana Jones movies. These locations/setpeices were exciting and engaging to a passive audience ...


0

Grunts I'd say the first step would be to pick a "common" monster around the CR level of the players that will encapsulate the majority of encounters in the dungeon. These are typically the "grunt" encounters of a dungeon, they exist to make the cool encounters that you plan more awesome by comparison. The most important thing when planning grunt ...


6

Generate a random and empty dungeon. Roll some dice for page numbers and get monsters from those pages, then place them in the rooms. Now think about what makes all of this monsters live together in the same place. This is my recipe for making and/or creating random dungeons. I used it a few times back then, and we all really enjoyed it, but being 3 years ...



Top 50 recent answers are included