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0

The standard roll for Dungeon World is 2d6. When the system asks you to Roll+(a value), you roll 2d6 and add the relevant value. For example, when you are told to "roll+STR", you roll 2d6 and add your Strength Modifier. For melee combat, the basic move is "Hack and Slash", which reads as follows: When you attack an enemy in melee, roll+Str. ✴On a 10+, ...


1

I guess you are confused because you dice twice for a hack'n'slash: 1) dice 2d6+STR so see if the attack works out at all, i.e. if you hit. 2) dice your characters damage dice, e.g. 1d10 for a fighter. For further information read the core rulebook, watch some youtubed livestreams of people playing the game, and join a hangout game via the dungeon world ...


5

The Animal Companion FAQ linked by @Ich addresses this to some extent, so I'd urge you to read it as it addresses many other common questions about ranger companions. One of the mechanical things you can leverage is the concept of tags, which are already used by the animal companion. Adding a tag like injured or wary of thieves or unable to fly gives the GM ...


5

The best way for the GM to handle this is to keep in mind: Don't eff with The Ranger's Animal Companion. Just like you don't break The Fighter's Signature Weapon. ...Unless they really ask for it. Which in this case, The Ranger certainly hasn't. What's more important, this one attack by The Thief, or the thing that makes The Ranger cool? You can be a ...


8

Your assumptions are correct. Cantrips and rotes are treated as level 0 spells and are subject to all rules that affect how spells work.


0

In general, I'd give the PC the use of the shield - "the orc charges you from the right, and you instinctively twist to get your shield up as he swings his hammer". This is because there's nothing explicit in the rules about the shield being dependent on positioning. If earlier action gave the character a negative consequence (like establishing weakness, ...


2

You may want to read The 16 Hitpoint Dragon. It's an excellent account of how someone used Dungeon World's rules and highlights that the actual hitpoint numbers might be quite modest, but the fiction can be quite terrifying and have it's own effects. So, "hit for 5 hitpoints" could be a lot of things, and that depends on the situation that happens in play: ...


10

This rules text covers a lot of what you're asking (Harm and Healing, P.21): Damage is dealt based on the fiction. Moves that deal damage, like hack and slash, are just a special case of this: the move establishes that damage is being dealt in the fiction. Damage can be assigned even when no move is made, if it follows from the fiction. HP loss is ...


4

As with a lot of the questions you're asking about Dungeon World, the answer here is 'it does if it makes sense within the fiction you have established so far'. A definitive yes or no is impossible, because it depends so much on the individual circumstances within whatever scene the question is being asked about. So, you need to ask yourself - does it make ...


33

Short Answer The characters don't know, so there's no need to tell their players. But why's that? Your GM principles should give you your answer here: Address the characters, not the players. Begin and end with the fiction Give every monster life Remember, your principles and agendas are rules just like HP and armor. If you're telling the players ...


3

First of all, the PCs never know any of these. HP and stats are an abstract meta concept and can ever only be known to the players. Personally, I do not tell my players the stats of a monster. However, monster stats are easily figured out by the players anyway. Monster stats are defined by the fiction. When you build a monster according to the rules, you ...


0

Definitely meta. I'd even say "You are hit with a war hammer, your left knee is smashed. Mark 5 damage." As for the two situations you depict: in many rulesets lost HP affects gameplay in some additional fiction-related way. if it's a smashed knee, there will be more thrill if it also affects running. one potion.


-4

This is a tougher choice than it looks at first. Sure camping breaks up the action and givesa quick break. Furthermore it will refresh spells/abilities/hp prepping the part back up near top fighting condition. I have had issues where a party realizes this and camps at every chance that they can. And I do mean every chance they could. I started enacting ...


9

You've said it yourself: Go with the fiction If they decide they need to camp for a night then sure, ask them to mark off rations and decide their watch order. If they're spending the night in an inn and pay for food and lodgings (or earn them through heroic deeds), why would they consume rations or have to take watch? If they're in a situation where ...


2

There is no answer for this; In fact, I'm not aware of any games where there IS an answer to "How many times in a 'session' should I expect the PCs to make camp?" It really depends on the content of the session, both in terms of 'density' (A session in which a lot of things are happening has a higher chance of the party making camp than a session in which ...


0

I´d offer an opportunity to go with the rules: Staying a night in an inn or house is making camp, too. Regain your hit points as usual, but only mark off a ration if you’re eating from the food you carry, not paying for a meal or receiving hospitality. There could be some eremit in despair need of help, and if they help him, he offers the a free ...


40

Let's have another look at the Know-It-All move (emphasis mine). Know-It-All When another player’s character comes to you for advice and you tell them what you think is best, they get +1 forward when following your advice and you mark experience if they do. Now let's look at your proposed scenario: the Fighter is under attack and you've asked him ...


9

That's not what the move says. A move applies when it's fictional description happens, and there is a significant difference between “[a] character comes to you for advice” and “[a] player […] asks [you] questions”. So, if the other players just ask you any random question at the table, this move does not trigger, and no imbalance is done. However, if ...


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Moves represent game-mechanical actions tied to fictional cues. When another PC "comes to [the wizard] for advice," that's likely to be, like, a little scene. This move is clearly about the wizard being the educated expert (likely annoyingly overeducated, hence the name). In Dungeon World, the GM decides when a move is triggered. What's going on in the ...


1

As a GM i just wouldn't let them abuse mechanics like that. After all something like that wouldn't be very DungeonWorld-esque... On the other hand I might let them play it out and, eventually the wizard might be so distracted by the constant questioning that he fails to recognise the random Goblin sneaking up on him.


1

The answer to your specific question is that due to the result of 8, which falls into the category 7–9, the villain gets to make an attack. That does not automatically mean that damage will be dealt. The GM has the choice to use one of the NPCs monster moves, which can be anything from simply doing damage or throwing a net at the PC to calling support. ...


3

It's Your Call The pace of levelling is a dial you can turn. From Advanced Delving: Changing the Basics p. 355: There are some parts of the game that are exceptionally easy to change. The amount of XP to level reflects our view, but you can easily make leveling more or less rare. As well, the kinds of things players are awarded XP for can be easily ...


7

This question really heavily depends on your groups style of play, frequency of moves and duration and frequency of sessions. Frequency of sessions: the more often you play and the shorter your sessions are, the more often you will use the End of Session move and thus earn XP at a faster rate. Frequency of moves: the more often a move involving a roll is ...


6

Yes, of course! Whenever the fictions establishes it! That means, whenever a PC (or NPC for that matter) is convincingly able to hit multiple targets, it can do so. How do you handle that mechanically? You have the PC roll any defy danger and/or hack&slash as usual, let them roll their damage and apply the damage to every target hit. On/around page ...



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