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21

You have gnolls working with goblins, kobolds, and ogres. Does the party perhaps have a human, elf, dwarf, and gnome? Because that’s exactly the same level of variety. I’m serious, it can help to think of things in those terms: the “bad guys” can be just as cooperative as the “good guys.” There’s nothing wrong with this at all. Best is if there is a good ...


21

Yes, the name/class/level relationship was originally an in-game term depicting a level of power and social status. Some in-game effects of this were the limitations on level advancement for AD&D(1e) Monks and Druids (details below), or prohibitions against Assassins (Blackmoor) having followers. Originally, the Name Level threshold opened up new ...


15

Short version: Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha appears to be available for use, but tread carefully. This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer. If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their ...


10

The closest would be OD&D and AD&D 1st edition and level titles. Particularly at 9th to 12th level at what was called "Name level" where the game gave explicit support for making the character a leader of his profession. The various level titles are evocative of various positions in the profession that the class represent, and are generally arranged ...


9

Yes I am not a lawyer and anyone can sue anyone for anything. However... Many RPGs, not under license from D&D using the OGL or otherwise, have used identically named ability scores since 1975 with no legal problems; see this great breakdown of key ability scores in major fantasy games through 1983. Some have more, some have less, most use at least 5 ...


9

There are many opinion-based answers possible for this question. For example, in your setting, kobolds and gnolls could have an ancient treaty of cooperation, or ogres could make a habit of capturing and keeping kobold slaves. But there are also mechanical approaches you could use. Listed associations The Monster Manual has an Organization line in monster ...


5

The "Holmes" blue book spells it out pretty clearly that the one-level-at-a-time rule is a hard limit to the lopsided experience point awards that would be awarded in "special circumstances" where a single character could gain experience that had been "earned" by the whole party. In early D&D, rules for awarding experience could result in some very ...


5

It was in the AD&D first edition's DMG, I'm quite sure. As for Pathfinder, part of the answer can be found in the traits of outsiders: Unlike most living creatures, an outsider does not have a dual nature—its soul and body form one unit. When an outsider is slain, no soul is set loose. Spells that restore souls to their bodies, such as raise dead, ...


4

Unless you are making a strong good-faith attempt to emulate a particular setting (such as playing faithfully in a published RPG like the Forgotten Realms, or trying to emulate a particular series of books or movies you enjoy) then these decisions are largely up to you. In general, look on this as an opportunity to tell an interesting story, though, rather ...


3

Assuming that this is written with U.S. law in mind, game rules cannot be copyrighted, at all; neither can words. Thus, you can certainly use the same names for ability scores without infringing on copyright. From the U.S. Copyright Office circular on games: Copyright does not protect the idea for a game, its name or title, or the method or methods for ...


2

Firstly, take any advice from me or anyone else who isn't a lawyer with a grain of salt. In my knowledge, it is completely legal to create, use, and manufacture an RPG or other product with the same statistics as the traditional Dungeons and Dragons ones. That being said, if the product you create too closely resembles another copyrighted product, it can ...


2

Sure, if you want to include the OGL! Well, yes, you can definitely because it's under OGL. Actually re-reading the OGL, I noticed that you would have to staple it to your finished product, but you're not actually compelled to license anything of your own under the OGL. But do you have to? Game mechanics in and of themselves are not typically covered ...


2

"Plane Speaking" A list of tuning forks for AD&D for use with the spell plane shift appears in the Dragon #120 (Apr. 1987) article "Plane Speaking: Tuning in to the Outer Planes" (43-4). Names of planes changed with editions, but determining that, for example, D&D 3.5's Carceri is 1987's Tarterus takes only a little research. (For example, an E-flat ...


1

Yes. It's perfectly legal to do so. It's also perfectly legal for WotC to sue you in civil court for doing so and seek (hugely excessive) damages. Your ability to win that lawsuit depends to what degree you can argue that your product is not substantially based on WotC's product. Currently, especially in America(United States of), courts have taken ...


1

Here is what WOTC's site has to say about abilities being open content: The System Reference Document is a comprehensive toolbox consisting of rules, races, classes, feats, skills, various systems, spells, magic items, and monsters compatible with the d20 System version of Dungeons & Dragons and various other roleplaying games from Wizards of the ...



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