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13

It's from a 2e Planescape supplement called Faces of Evil: The Fiends, and while it doesn't appear to be a whole layer, it is all data I can find on official stuff existing on that layer. In short, on the 403rd layer of the Abyss, a Fallen Archon rules the City of Confusion, and several other Fallen Archons are her minions. They try to cure the mortals that ...


11

This isn't rare at all. This is the Monster Manual from the 1st edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. It's worth about $5–$25 (US) on eBay, depending on condition. I got mine there for about $12, a few years ago, and prices haven't changed. Yours looks to be in fairly beaten condition, so you're unlikely to get anything much for it. Although it's not ...


7

As excerpted from earlier question How do I learn to become a good GM?, for each game you are interested in, go watch it be played (or participate in playing it). The actual differences in 'the rules' are less important than how the combination of rules, adventures, and common approaches particular to those games actually come out in real play. Watch In ...


7

After hints from @Lord_Gareth and a fair bit of searching, I found what I was looking for: Androlynne, Abyssal Layer 471. It is detailed on page 148 of the D&D 3.5 Fiendish Codex I - Hordes of the Abyss. It is ruled by an Obyrith, Pale Night, so it isn't really controlled by Celestials. Eladrin children are bound here, and Good creatures wage a ...


6

Some people are attached to their old characters. But obviously, you can't run a campaign where half the players are level 10 and the other half are level 1. If you simply point this out to them, and ask them how they'd feel if the other players were a higher level than them, you should be able to make everyone see that this is necessary. In the end, ...


6

No. I notice you didn't specify edition, but I'm familiar with them all—and none that use random encounters (and tables thereof) tailor their numbers to the size of the party. The editions that include that specific kind of randomness are already aiming to provide a naturalistic experience, where the world is not tailored to the party, and having ...


5

Oriental Adventures was produced both for AD&D 1e and then again for 3e; the latter was actually an adaptation to d20 of the pretty deep Oriental game The Legend Of The Five Rings. Both had very in depth honor systems and the latter especially tried to hew to a non-Western way of looking at things. For the Jade Regent adventure path, Paizo came out with ...


5

I think OP is trying to account more for the fact that a larger group of adventurers reasonably will attract more attention than a smaller group. This isn't a tailoring of difficulty persay, but more of an expression of the amount of "noise" the adventurers make going through hostile territory. In this case I would advocate rolling multiple times on the ...


5

Nearly every early edition has a free clone or near clone. Lists mapping the retro-clones to editions are easily found. I would look at several of those and based on that pick one or two early editions to pick up. I would note most early editions are available at DriveThruRPG and core books are reasonably priced. You could sample Moldvay, and Mentzer ...


3

You could try to create a golden retire for their old characters. You can offer them that their characters will have important jobs in the same city/region. Try to work with them interesting destinies. Maybe, the will appear in the story from time to time, showing how awesome they are. Maybe they even can roleplay them in some occasions. They could be ...


2

Convert characters, rather than replacing them outright. Start by explaining to them that the characters need to all be built under the same system as each other for the game to be able to function as such. Have them rebuild the same character under the new rules. For most characters this is pretty straightforward (Pathfinder was specifically designed with ...


2

In Dragon Magazine 404 (4th edition), there is a rules supplement covering exactly what you are looking for: Unearthed Arcana: A Matter of Honor The article presents different ways to implement honor and different styles in which it can be presented such as "Thieves' code", "Bushido", "Chivalry" and "Harper's code." If you implement the Honor code system ...


2

Wikipedia has a page about the different editions of D&D, and also pages for each edition, which should cover the most important parts. If you want to know more about 3.5e, the SRD has all the rules on it - and it's completely free and legal. Sadly most editions of D&D aren't freely and legally available on the Internet, and if you want to learn ...


1

There's four main kinds of DnD played at the moment, by my understanding. I'll try to give a brief overview of where you can look for resources for each of the three you don't know about. 3.5e The SRD for 3.5e is free to read and hosted on several internet sites. Additionally, people write about it a lot. Unfortunately, the SRD is missing a lot of ...


1

For excellent images, become used to Searching I use two main sources for my stock images - Deviantart.com and Google's Image Search. It's a skill like any other to find the correct search terms - I recommend developing it, though, as it's incredibly useful for many other things as well. One specific trick that I find useful is to find synonyms of the ...


1

Also, the 10 ft pole would have been assumed in the making of maps while exploring. Things have to be measured (which is one of the reasons exploratory movement in AD&D was so slow) and you need a standard by which those measurements are taken. If you know that your pole is 10 feet long, and the room is "two-poles by four-poles" then you know that's 20 ...



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