Hot answers tagged

85

As with other aspects of the game, as the GM you have a lot of leeway here. Just because the Adventure Path/Campaign/Monster Manual says that these creatures are spiders doesn't mean that they have to be. After all, all a monster is is "A block of stats with fluff" (Thanks @Grey Sage, I particularly liked that quote) You can easily reskin spiders with creepy,...


73

One thing to keep in mind before you just port spider-like abilities over to something that isn't quite a spider is that real arachnophobia isn't just a matter of being "creeped out" by them. I have a good friend who suffers from it and it's a real condition that is completely outside of his control. Halloween is a terrible time for him, because fluffy toy ...


24

You should probably just have this discussion with the player, rather than trying to plan something out without their input. Phobias are very personal things, and no matter your best intentions, creating a creature that acts almost exactly, or even partially like a spider, could still trigger that phobia. Ask them what it is about spiders that worries ...


21

While I agree with the selected answer, I feel like I would be remiss if I do not suggest some kind of slime creature as a substitute, since it has worked for us. I don't have resources handy at the moment, but slimes and other similar creatures can easily tick these boxes while avoiding general insect imagery. Need them to risk getting stuck in one place? ...


12

If you're wary of your reskinning being too apparent, an option that has at least some amount of preexisting relevance is a Dilophosaurus, the dinosaur that killed Dennis Nedry in Jurassic Park: https://youtu.be/MNoWveBtrZc?t=164 It spits sticky goo, you could easily say its bite is venomous, and if you describe it as it appears in that scene, it isn't too ...


8

My wife is highly arachnophobic, so my group has had to handle this in the past. Our system is pretty simple. Rather than replacing the creatures, we use a set of code words: spiders are now sheep. Everyone, including my wife, knows what the words really mean. But because we keep them consistent among themselves, it offers each player a choice: mentally ...


7

Have you considered splitting the powers up between multiple opponents? For example, instead of giant spiders, you have a sect of net wielding goblin rangers with a viper animal companions. The goblin uses the net to trap opponents so its comparatively weak snake can bite them more easily. And the sect has a preferred tactic of launching a surprise ...


6

According to RPGGeek, it was written for Original ("White Box") D&D. There are several retroclones available that are more or less compatible with "White Box" rules. (Even BECMI or AD&D-1e are not too different.)


5

Jeff L makes a really good point about why this might not be the best idea. However, if you really want a spider replacement, the Ettercap is just about ideal. It has these things going for it: Poisonous bite Web ability Web walking ability Humanoid, so doesn't look much like a spider The picture in the Monster Manual is pretty much the opposite of scary, ...


4

If the encounter should have immobilization of the characters you could use giant insects in place of spiders. This will keep the theme of real life animals made into giant monsters. Example: Giant moths that spin cocoons out of silk to trap PCs and have a poisonous dust that emits from them. OR: Giant ants that craft devious traps out of leaves. PCs ...


4

Response out of personal experience and irrational fears in RPGs. Not necessarily a direct response to "what to use in place of spiders" but more "how to handle out of game phobias in game". I have a fear of zombies and they scare the hell out of me (I can usually handle skeletons). Unfortunately, undead are a pretty regular theme in most RPGs. I've played ...


3

Well, it looks like you're trying to find a cross-edition answer, but that is going to be really hard to pull off becuase game design philosopies changed over the years and some of your examples clearly show so (and this should answer your last question properly). In D&D 4e, radiant and necrotic are just two different types of damage, just like fire ...


3

The Caverns of Thracia is compatible with Original D&D, Holmes Basic, and AD&D First Edition. To the extent that AD&D Second Edition didn’t change much of the basics, it is also compatible with that, and the same is true of the later Basic/Expert/etc. and Rules Cyclopedia versions of D&D. Thracia reads like a mashup of OD&D and Holmes ...


1

There is a version of Caverns of Thracia that was written for D&D 3.5 on drive thru rpg if that helps. I remember seeing it there a few weeks back when I was looking for old modules to work into my campaign setting. I would link it but I'm new to stack exchange and don't know the rules regarding links. The original was way before my time so I can't help ...


1

This is not a rule-based answer (Ye have been warned). My opinion as DM is that unless the commoner has a really good reason to want to come back, the draw of the afterlife will probably keep them away. Think about it, they are going from a world where they could die at any time, suffer from diseases or just be struck down for being in the way, have to pay ...



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