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38

Here are pitfalls that I would watch out for: Confusing Stress with Hit Points - Stress is not hit points. Stress is not damage. Stress is a measure of your ability to avoid lasting consequences from conflicts. Don't get hung up on the false equivalence of Stress and "damage". Looking to the mechanics to drive the fiction - In Fate, the fiction drives, and ...


21

There's no definite one way to go, though I prefer to have characters know each other. Here's some options and what you get of it: Total Strangers How well does this work? Well that depends on whether your players are all willing to buy into "a group of strangers will work together as a team in life and death situations". It's a trope that makes up a ...


20

Gomad has a great list already. Here's a few more I've thought of. The first one, especially, is something I've both experienced, and heard of others experiencing: Understanding how aspects differ from traditional bonuses - Aspects may be "always true," but that doesn't mean they provide a constant mechanical effect, the way that a "+2 sword" might. They ...


14

Strangely enough, James Jacobs, the Dungeons and Dragons 3.5-derived Pathfinder publisher Paizo's creative director, answered much the same question about burnt othur fumes (which originally appeared in the Dungeon Master's Guide, Third Edition (2000)) in 2014 in this thread: Burnt othur fumes are an awesome poison. What's othur though? Is it a ...


13

Tucker was the Game Master for a game at Fort Bragg that Roger Moore (No relation) was involved in. From the DND-Wiki: Tucker's kobolds were a fictional tribe of kobolds made famous by Roger E. Moore's editorial in Dragon magazine issue 127.1 The editorial described a dungeon crawl adventure designed and run by a Game Master in Fort Bragg, North ...


11

The Wall of the Faithless was not actually made by Kelemvor, it was made by Myrkul. I am not 100% certain how canon Neverwinter Nights 2 is for Forgotton Realms lore, but in that game, Myrkul claims he had constructed the Wall to dispose of unclaimed, faithless souls. However, there could be multiple other reasons for him to do this. For starters, it is ...


9

It’s purely up to you and your players; there is no “should” here. Many campaigns start with a “session 0” where people discuss their characters, and whether or not any of them know any of the others. Typically DMs merely set a time and place, and tell players “make sure your character has a good reason to be here when the story starts,” or something along ...


9

While the general section on beholders in Lords of Madness doesn't give any particulars of the furniture in the beholder's lair, there is an example lair detailed later in the chapter (page 56). I won't reproduce the whole thing here, but the important room for our purposes is the beholder's personal chamber: This large chamber is quite impressive; the ...


8

There is nothing in the rules (at least that I'm aware of) that either allows or prevents the acquisition of a non-combat non-magical pet. That means that whether or not you can have a pet is completely and totally up to your DM. As to whether or not there is a balance issue related to having a pet, I would not be very worried about it. It may occasionally ...


8

Transitioning from a D&D-style system to Fate can be tricky due to three major considerations: story creation versus consumption, the dice effect, and non-binary results. What I mean by Creation versus Consumption is that most D&D-style games have a specific GM role who is responsible almost exclusively for Content and Story Creation, while the ...


5

I have observed players coming from "crunchy" systems (d20, TriStat) fall into these mental traps. Assuming that most contests will be combat or d20-like skill or saving checks. In Fate, a contest could just as easily be a chess game, a stare-down, a debate, or even fashion choices. And the outcomes of those contests can radically alter the course of ...


5

Lately I mostly play one-off games at conventions and such. In that context, characters who don't know each other at the beginning are pretty common. I think what's more important is that you have players who are willing to cooperate with each other. I have a friend who I don't game with anymore, because he obstructs the story and annoys everyone else under ...


4

There is another example lair, from Mysteries of the Moonsea. It seems beholders have nests, each one a bowl-shaped indentation atop a stone pillar, holds fluffy piles of feathers, fabric, and other soft materials So in the Moonsea, these three sleep on fluffy pillows. Personally, I'm kind of disappointed with how mundane the lairs are in these ...


4

Going through the Fate learning curve coming from more traditional things, there's a few things that really had to sink in. I think I've been pretty successful at helping others get through it, so here's the top things that I've learned. Fiction First This is the biggest thing. By fiction I don't mean "the GM's pre-planned story." I mean the stuff we ...


4

In many versions of D&D, there are prices for (some) pet-like animals in the equipment list, along with the usual mounts and pack animals. So, you could buy a dog or a chicken for the listed price. These have no mechanical benefit, though if the DM allows it, you may be able to train them to perform some tasks. For example, I don't have access to the 5e ...


3

In a 5ed game I am GMing currently one player wrote his back story as a dwarf that had a trusted goat. I used the Rangers animal companion rules to create it, he had planned for it to be just a background thing. My rational is that because he is a cleric he cannot get any of the ranger class ability's that are need the take advantage of the animal ...


2

I mean, if you would like to have it as part of your backstory, and/or for purely RPing purposes? and the two people who are co-GMing, aren't sold on the idea of a non-combat pet, mostly coming from a rule-based perspective I would suggest to ask them why. Are they afraid that you'll try to elevate the status of your pet (e.g. "my dog would ...


2

These are the key points to look for when you make the transition from D&D to fate, in my experience (D&D player, Fate GM and player): Always make failure interesting You shouldn't simply fail in what you are attempting (picklocking, observing, investigating, bartering, etc...) but you should, when possible, have a success with a cost. As an ...


2

I think you need to ask yourself some more questions (in addition to what other good answers say): Is it important for your story for the characters to know/not know each other? Are motivations for adventuring and backstories important for the players or your story? What’s the beginning of the story? I think the more you need PC backgrounds and ...


1

There's a few neat tactical elements that come out of old school initiative that are worth considering: Intraparty Action Order Notice how Missles>Spells>Melee within any given side? The important thing to note about this is that ranged weapons will never get the benefit from spells in the same round, while melee can always gain the benefit of spells in ...



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