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3

Flavor Start by thinking about what the "flavor" or general theme of the city is going to be like. Is it high or low fantasy? Bustling, decaying, wealthy, devastated, etc. Is it modeled after a real world culture or imagery - "Mayan cliff dwellers, but over 1,000 years of carving with magical assistance" etc. This is mostly mental, you don't need to ...


0

It all depends on what kind of information you expect about the city, but if you are looking for a quick and easy way, myth-weavers.com offers a very well made city generator, especially for 3.5. WotC also published a pdf that basically offered the same, but with dice roll tables instead of random automatic generation. It deals a lot with the power structure ...


4

All walls are passable, all mountains easily circumvented, all mundane enemies easily slain, every weather condition easily changed, every thought and alignment easily scryed, masses of people charmed at no cost. All of these things are extremely mundane. When you're dealing with Epic characters, you need a proper Epic setting, with proper Epic ...


5

So to go into this in a little more detail... Copyright, trademark, and other IP law is a whole separate standalone thing. If they have a trademark on those terms they'd be registered. I suspect those terms are general enough there's no trademark per se. In fact, you can find out. Check out this TESS search for "dungeon" which reveals "Dungeons & ...


-5

The OGL is actually more about trademarks than copyright, hence product identity. In any case, the inner and outer planes of Gygaxian D&D are all from myth and fantasy fiction, and no more copyright than "elf". Which is not to say that Hasbro might not set the lawyers on you if they feel like it, but as you bankrupt yourself to fight the case you could ...


1

The simple answer is not to set them up as a "kill or be killed" adversary. For example they can be hostile but have them do it in a gesturing way rather than an actual attack - they signal him to back away. They beat their chest and roar, etc. You could even have him run into one that's injured and trapped so it's clearly no threat to him but also not ...


12

Most normal creatures don't fight to the death as a matter of course, except in D&D. Most creatures will, when confronted with a threat (note, not food nor a rock1), run away, as this is the cheapest way of preserving life. Only if they can't run away will they fight. If they fight, they'll fight until they can... run away (see a pattern here?) For ...


2

Markovia and Tepest The book mentions the Monastic Order of the Guardians. That order is only present in Barovia, Hazlan, Markovia, Mordent, Sithicus, and Tepest. The Husband and Wife couple, Vhar and Leith, are storied to arrive in Markovia and stealing the Tapestry. Then they both return to Tepest.


13

Lots of classes in older D&D were not balanced to each other, and not balanced at every level of play. One of the main advantages that 2E monks had with the wacky unarmed combat tables was decent odds of getting knockouts or stuns - they had better chance of bumping up and down the results on the table, giving you some advantage there or of ...


4

This is, indeed, "Dragon's Lair" by Clyde Caldwell. A full-page version of the painting (without any text superimposed) can be found on page 119 of The Art of Dungeons & Dragons Fantasy Game (ISBN 0-88038-161-2)1. This book lists the original source as Dragon magazine #65. The artist's gallery (NFSW) doesn't have a version, but you can find it online ...


-1

I first saw that painting on the cover of Dragon issue 65 (September 1982).



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