New answers tagged

-2

I think the best way to answer this question is to pull some examples from real life and literature. First, the scale from chaotic to lawful has nothing to do with the scale from good to evil. A chaotic person does not like rules. They may follow rules because they are inherently good (i.e. thou shall not steal) or because they don't want to go to jail ...


7

Is there a precedent for granting a circumstantial bonus to ranged attacks made from high ground in D&D? Yes. In 2nd edition it was a +1 bonus. 3rd edition retained this +1 bonus for high ground, though it only applied to melee attacks, not ranged. Would it make sense to grant such a bonus in a 5th edition game? Probably not. 5e eschewed most ...


0

While I sympathize with you in that disruptive behavior can be detrimental to the group dynamics, I just want to point out that the behavior you describe is not necessarily bad behavior. I'll step through each of the behaviors you mentioned in your question. Burning down a pub to stop the flow of polluted beer: I can genuinely imagine a character who would ...


16

This is "alignment," which is a label for a character's moral or ethical leanings in relation to metaphysical forces. What exactly the labels means has actually varied considerably over time. D&D originally had an alignment system inspired by Michael Moorcock's fiction: Law, Chaos, and Neutrality in between. Law generally represents a drive to order ...


25

The term 'chaotic' is part of the alignment system in D&D. Within the alignment system, your personality and decision making is rated on two scales. One from good to evil, and the other from lawful to chaotic.From the D&D Player's Handbook (5e): Lawful good (LG) creatures can be counted on to do the right thing as expected by society. Gold ...


29

D&D has a concept called “alignment,” which is a kind of shorthand for one’s ethical, moral, and philosophical outlook on life. It has two axes, the good-evil axis and the lawful-chaotic axis, and you can either be at those extremes, or at neutral in the middle. Your alignment is a combination of these two axes, so your choices end up looking like this: ...


8

The only official source I can find for this question is an article published in Dragon #80 entitled "The Psychology of Doppelgangers", which includes the following conversation: "My lord, you don't understand. One of the anomalies I found was the absence of any reproductive organs, either on the dead specimen or this one. ...


10

It is defined in some settings, such as Eberron where they are neuter: Unlike true doppelgangers, changelings do have gender in their natural form, although they can adopt any shape they like. - Changelings, p. 12, Eberron Campaign Setting It is not otherwise/explicitly defined in the Monster Manual for other settings. If it's a plot point, the GM ...


0

I found an incredibly helpful table in one of the D&D subreddits that does exactly this. It takes a few minutes to use, but it's very thorough!


4

Before you can place a town or city, you must first have a world to place it in. When building your world you will need to determine general aspects that apply to your entire world, such as gods and their religions, races and their cultures, empires and their locations and other questions beyond the scope of this question. Once you have your world, you then ...


33

The methodology I've settled on is as follows: The creature is the dominant inhabitant of the correct alignment plane (according to the Manual of the Planes). The Greyhawk (default setting for D&D 3.5) cosmology lists the Outer Planes that are keyed to the nine alignments. The creature has the appropriate alignment subtypes - an iconic Lawful Good ...


27

In AD&D, the cosmology of D&D which had gradually developed over the course of numerous publications was codified into the Planescape setting, which focused on adventures on the planes besides the Prime Material. The architecture of the cosmology focused on the “Great Wheel,” the sixteen planes surrounding the Outlands. These seventeen planes, ...


14

Only one puts magic items in the PHB: D&D 4e. All other editions, including D&D 5e, put magic items in the DMG. In nearly every edition, magic items are not only just in the DMG, but are even reserved exclusively for the DM to introduce at their sole discretion. The one exception (other than 4e) is D&D 3.x, where magic items are the province of ...


0

Flavor wise, use of charisma for spellcasting ability is that their bloodline allows them to impose their force of personality on reality in the form of spells. Personally, I feel this makes little sense. Historically and mechanically charisma changed a lot from 3.0 forwards. Previously, charisma was important for all characters. Reaction modifiers could ...


-2

I would vote for Magic Jar. It makes the role playing really creative - playing a character using the body of other. Roleplay in roleplay.


-2

Recently, I allowed a player to use create water on a shambling mound made of swampy, mostly watery plant material to cause over 40 HP of damage by causing it to swell up and explode. This was with a party of six 12th level characters finding it difficult to deliver damage to a group of shamblers. The player was pleased to find an otherwise useless low level ...


8

Following Wikipedia's Garl Glittergold publication history, I perused Deities and Demigods (1980) and the Dragon #61 (1982) article "The Gnomish Point of View" (28-30) for AD&D, Monster Mythology (1992) and Demihuman Deities (1998) for AD&D2E, Deities and Demigods (2002) and Faiths and Pantheons (2002) for D&D3E, and Complete Divine (2004) for ...


2

I'm not an expert on copyright law, but I'm fairly sure that there isn't any reason you couldn't write a story based on a D&D campaign. As long as you make sure to change anything that may be specifically owned by Wizards of the Coast (like your example with tieflings) or part of an established cannon(I think the default setting for d&d is the ...


2

The understanding of authors of D&D 5th edition is encoded in a short set of notes on the plane shift spell in the DMG's chapter on the planes that discusses various means of planar travel. To make and tune the tuning fork requires specific knowledge that can only be gained from direct experience of the destination plane itself, either first-hand or ...


19

Blame R.A. Salvatore. Lolth was represented in several D&D Works, from 1978 to 1987. The discrepancy arrived with the Crystal Shard in 1988. It was later corrected in Exile, with reason given Drizzt quietly recounted to Belwar the story of the [...] decision to forsake his kin and their evil deity, Lloth. Belwar realized that Drizzt was talking ...



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