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0

You could try with Love and Sex in the Ninth World. While it's written for Numenera, comments I've read about it say that it's easily applicable to most RPGs. Description: Love, courtship, and sexual practices in the Ninth World. Love and Sex in the Ninth World is a guide to integrating elements of love and sex into any Numenera story or ...


2

While I agree with the excellent answers so far, I feel that the complexity of the math has not been addresses quite yet. For every combination of AC, damage and to Hit, you would have to calculate Damage = (AC-AttackBonus)/20 * (maxDmg+minDmg)/2 Not taking into account damage reduction (see Envision's answer) Think of a simple fight between 4 PCs and 3 ...


3

As @wax-eagle said, this is a broad question. But, here's what you can do. Talk to the DM: Tell them you don't like what they're doing and see if they can explain why they're doing it. Maybe that character is given carte blanche by the plot. Maybe this is their first time and they don't understand what they're doing. Include the others: If you're the only ...


5

The best solution to bad GMs is good GMs both as examples and competition. If your club only has one GM I would recommend that you take a turn behind the screen. You may or may not enjoy it in the long run but in my experience the key power of a bad GM is the sense that there is no where else to go. You could encourage others to take a turn GMing as well. ...


3

I believe there would be several unusual side effects from trying to use this sort of averaging system. There are also several circumstances unaffected or unconsidered by this change. Firstly, any attack that has an unusually high chance of hitting will do a commensurately-higher amount of damage under this system. Any attack that targets touch AC will ...


5

Maybe most importantly, consider the effects on the fun of combat. You mentioned the absence of critical hits; I'll say from experience that finishing the fight against the Big Bad Evil Guy with a critical hit is one of the most satisfying ways to end a battle. On the other hand, the most exciting part of combat shouldn't be "roll a 15 and hit or roll a 14 ...


14

The suggested mechanic uses similar maths that optimisers use to build combat-focussed characters. Also White Dwarf magazine presented an optional Monster Mark system of experience built around expected damage to a standardised fighter (I think this may even of made it into a TSR product, but I may be mis-remembering). In the unmodified game, there are lots ...


0

Part of running a campaign without combat is having characters that are not all about combat but still interesting. The player characters are central to the story, so unsurprisingly their core competencies shape how they solve problems and what problems are important to them. How about a guild of thieves trying to make their way? A cabal of secretive wizards ...


1

There are several types of mission archetypes that are common to P'n'P games in my experience (and this is not an exhaustive list but it's pretty close to it): Extermination A simple kill-job that has the player characters violently eliminate a particular group of enemies or as many enemies as they can until the mission parameters are satisfied with the ...


0

The actual rulebooks for certain editions are available legally in PDF. Moldvay (B/X), Mentzer (BECMI) and Alston (Cyclopedia) are available at DNDclassics.com The D&D 3.5 Rules Compendium also is available at DNDclassics.com. AD&D 1E has most of the supplementary books available, but the core rules are not at present available in legal PDF. Poor ...


1

Used books often turn up with old copies in paper. I've seen them at Half-Priced Books in College Station, Austin, Houston, and Dallas. They're usually pretty beaten up but not too expensive. If they are in good condition expect to pay big bucks. eBay, Amazon, et al are also your friends but expect to pay more (although as I type the top result on eBay ...


0

If you're interested primarily in learning the rules and can't find a group, consider playing video games rather than reading through books. To learn 3.5, consider Temple of Elemental Evil, which faithfully implements most of the game's core mechanics, including classes and feats from the Player's Handbook. It's slow to start, so I never got into it. ...


7

As excerpted from earlier question How do I learn to become a good GM?, for each game you are interested in, go watch it be played (or participate in playing it). The actual differences in 'the rules' are less important than how the combination of rules, adventures, and common approaches particular to those games actually come out in real play. Watch In ...


1

There's four main kinds of DnD played at the moment, by my understanding. I'll try to give a brief overview of where you can look for resources for each of the three you don't know about. 3.5e The SRD for 3.5e is free to read and hosted on several internet sites. Additionally, people write about it a lot. Unfortunately, the SRD is missing a lot of ...


5

Nearly every early edition has a free clone or near clone. Lists mapping the retro-clones to editions are easily found. I would look at several of those and based on that pick one or two early editions to pick up. I would note most early editions are available at DriveThruRPG and core books are reasonably priced. You could sample Moldvay, and Mentzer ...


2

Wikipedia has a page about the different editions of D&D, and also pages for each edition, which should cover the most important parts. If you want to know more about 3.5e, the SRD has all the rules on it - and it's completely free and legal. Sadly most editions of D&D aren't freely and legally available on the Internet, and if you want to learn ...


1

For excellent images, become used to Searching I use two main sources for my stock images - Deviantart.com and Google's Image Search. It's a skill like any other to find the correct search terms - I recommend developing it, though, as it's incredibly useful for many other things as well. One specific trick that I find useful is to find synonyms of the ...


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This isn't rare at all. This is the Monster Manual from the 1st edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. It's worth about $5–$25 (US) on eBay, depending on condition. I got mine there for about $12, a few years ago, and prices haven't changed. Yours looks to be in fairly beaten condition, so you're unlikely to get anything much for it. Although it's not ...


1

Also, the 10 ft pole would have been assumed in the making of maps while exploring. Things have to be measured (which is one of the reasons exploratory movement in AD&D was so slow) and you need a standard by which those measurements are taken. If you know that your pole is 10 feet long, and the room is "two-poles by four-poles" then you know that's 20 ...


0

The Crimson Pandect contains a custom class for a sect of (mostly) elves called the Kuan Amelatu who are essentially good necromancers. Their focus is on aiding the spirits of the dead, whether that means destroying undead creatures, taking vengeance against murderers and necromancers, or soothing the spirits of those who are unable to move on to their ...


0

You can absolutely make a good necromancer by the RAW. A lot of the answers are making the assumption that you're talking about raising the dead... but necromancers make exceptional hunters of the undead. In addition to all the necromantic 'raise dead' type spells, there's also a lot of necromantic spells that specifically target hostile undead, or allow ...


-1

You can make a good necromancer, but you're going to have to houserule away the Good/Evil descriptors on spells. As everyone else has pointed out, RAW says healing Good, undead Bad, no ifs ands or buts. But since you're already planning on going a bit off-script with your necromancer anyway, there's no reason to stick to those. (And personally, I've never ...


7

After hints from @Lord_Gareth and a fair bit of searching, I found what I was looking for: Androlynne, Abyssal Layer 471. It is detailed on page 148 of the D&D 3.5 Fiendish Codex I - Hordes of the Abyss. It is ruled by an Obyrith, Pale Night, so it isn't really controlled by Celestials. Eladrin children are bound here, and Good creatures wage a ...


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It's from a 2e Planescape supplement called Faces of Evil: The Fiends, and while it doesn't appear to be a whole layer, it is all data I can find on official stuff existing on that layer. In short, on the 403rd layer of the Abyss, a Fallen Archon rules the City of Confusion, and several other Fallen Archons are her minions. They try to cure the mortals that ...


0

I'm currently developing an open-source platform-independent desktop suite to address my own needs in this area. You can check out the GitHub repository here. Right now it handles dice rolling and I'm currently working on the combat tracking. It tracks initiative, HP, position, and some statuses. It comes with a sample blank battle grid where each square is ...


2

Convert characters, rather than replacing them outright. Start by explaining to them that the characters need to all be built under the same system as each other for the game to be able to function as such. Have them rebuild the same character under the new rules. For most characters this is pretty straightforward (Pathfinder was specifically designed with ...


3

You could try to create a golden retire for their old characters. You can offer them that their characters will have important jobs in the same city/region. Try to work with them interesting destinies. Maybe, the will appear in the story from time to time, showing how awesome they are. Maybe they even can roleplay them in some occasions. They could be ...


6

Some people are attached to their old characters. But obviously, you can't run a campaign where half the players are level 10 and the other half are level 1. If you simply point this out to them, and ask them how they'd feel if the other players were a higher level than them, you should be able to make everyone see that this is necessary. In the end, ...


5

I think OP is trying to account more for the fact that a larger group of adventurers reasonably will attract more attention than a smaller group. This isn't a tailoring of difficulty persay, but more of an expression of the amount of "noise" the adventurers make going through hostile territory. In this case I would advocate rolling multiple times on the ...


6

No. I notice you didn't specify edition, but I'm familiar with them all—and none that use random encounters (and tables thereof) tailor their numbers to the size of the party. The editions that include that specific kind of randomness are already aiming to provide a naturalistic experience, where the world is not tailored to the party, and having ...



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