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5

There are two meanings to the "Wyrm" in D&D. In-world It's just a really big / old dragon Game mechanics term In D&D 3.0 / 3.5 Wyrm and Great Wyrm are age categories of True Dragons. As can be seen in SRD: Category Age (Years) Wyrmling 0-5 Very young 6-15 Young 16-25 Juvenile 26-50 Young adult 51-100 Adult ...


1

If you insist on staying in D&D (dont!), diplomacy is your best option. Make your players in charge of some high level organization (like a kingdom or a village or something) and design scenarios that focus on terse diplomatic situations rather than combat. Be aware many players will resort to gunboat diplomacy on the assumption that's the only ...


-1

The word for dragon in Germanic mythology and its descendants is worm (Old English: wyrm, Old High German: wurm, Old Norse: ormr), meaning snake or serpent. In Old English, wyrm means "serpent", and draca means "dragon". Wikipedia


23

Originally, the term is an Old English word that means "serpent" or "snake". It was commonly found in old European poems, where it referred to a wingless dragon. The term was later used to refer to any dragon, as with Tolkien's usage in The Hobbit and other works (which heavily influenced D&D). In D&D, "wyrm" refers to a large, presumably old, ...


24

"Wyrm" (and its variant spelling "worm") is a common but old synonym for "dragon" in English. It's not originally a D&D or RPG term, but it's seen more often in fantasy RPGs (and fantasy literature) than everyday English because archaic words lend games a more fantasy feel.


2

According to the blurb on this site, there is a map of the Feywild created for the book Heroes of the Feywild. Look about 3/4 the way down the page, or search for the term Feywild. It says you can purchase a copy, or you can probably get the book and get it that way as well.


1

In addition to the more “straight” examples offered by d7, many varieties of “true” dragon in D&D can take on the form of humanoids (as well as other animals). For example, in the 3.5 edition (which is relatively easy to reference thanks to the SRD), the bronze, gold, and silver are core dragons that are capable of it. The steel ...


7

Yes, it's possible. The idea of inverting a were-creature into a "creature-were" isn't new and has been done in various editions of D&D. There are various monsters and "PC" races (and because this is a game of imagination, new ones can — and are, often created): hengeyokai, jackalweres (not werejackals!), wolfweres, kitsune, and many others ...


2

I have been playing campaigns in Roll20 for two years now and it works pretty well for me. It's mostly system-agnostic. Their 2014 report shows that the most popular systems are D&D/Pathfinder (PF, 5E, 3.5, 4E, AD&D, OD&D in that order), Star Wars, Dark Heresy, Shadowrun, GURPS, Dungeon World, FATE, etc.


2

There's a couple of dials you can turn that create different experiences for travel. "Are we sick of each other yet?" First, it's worth noting whether this is something your group even wants in their game at all. Most of us like to play action-adventure RPGs and don't particularly care to endure mundane drama as part of our escapism. Talk to your group ...


3

Another idea that can sometimes apply, but perhaps not in this case, is to set up a tight deadline. If your party has only 16 days to get from Alpha to Beta before something happens (obviously not "you lose" but rather "things get more interesting"), then you could show them on the map that the safe route from city to city along patrolled roads takes 20. ...


1

Refluff the attacks into something appropriately arcane. The seeker's capabilities are fine, it's just the descriptions which are problematic. For this instance, either swap the primary stat to int (it doesn't harm anything) and just describe the attacks as energy and arcane based, or ... simply describe the capabilities appropriately.


-1

Erik and Jonas had good answers. One more point: Allow the players to describe a camp routine for their characters, so the GM doesn't have to ask questions like "did you post any guards" when it really matters. Let them come up with sustainable watch rotations, or deal with the consequences. Ask them just how much food and water they're carrying, if you ...


2

What about turning travel time into a puzzle or a "game-within-a-game" to add a little danger and fun to the journey? The hallmark of a fun game is problem solving and having to make difficult decisions. Without refering to specific landmarks that lie between Neverwinter and Cormyr (I don't have a map of Faerun handy), here are a few examples: Min/max ...


8

TL;DR: Skip random encounters, make encounters during travel meaningful for the story. Travel, as any other part of game you play out, should have a purpose. Actually, it should have several purposes: Involve the players, let the characters shine, move the story forward, add to the world. If all you'd do with traveling is get to a new place where the ...


54

I see two primary ways to approach this, depending on the travel. (TL;DR at the end) Travelling through civilized lands From your description, it seems like your players (who are, considering you are playing D&D4e, are basically powerful heroes) are travelling between two cities in a civilized nation. In this case, I'm not even sure if I'd run any kind ...


5

I'd like to add a few extra things to the other answers here, which are all good answers as well, but don't cover the whole feel and experience of the differences. Rules as Simulation? 3.5e attempts to simulate a world with numbers and rules. If you have X strength, you can lift Y pounds. A given weapon or spell does exactly X damage to any opponent's ...


3

Generally speaking, when using these different generation techniques the idea is that in the Heroic and Epic ones the threats you're facing will be in fact on the whole more powerful than ones you'd see at the lower levels. Their abilities are scarier, their stats are higher, and they represent threats on a larger scale than many of the foes of lower levels ...


2

Because ability score method names don't really imply game difficulty. Using alternate ability score generation methods tweaks one dial: approximately how powerful player characters are relative to a fictional "normal" person (within a certain bounding box). Certainly, if you take a low powered/classic character and drop them into a campaign of high ...



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