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44

Stop dealing with the 98% of the population. If they're so rich, they are now peers of the 2% of the population who rule in various ways. Peasants may have little to offer in reward (perhaps fealty?), but queens, nobles, generals, and the heads of merchant empires will want to either control or ally with such powerful figures – before their rivals do. As a ...


33

There are a few games with reasonable economics: Runequest (2nd or 3rd ed, not the Mongoose versions) and Pendragon (all editions). Fantasy Wargaming, for all its derision as a game, has decent econ research. Later versions of Chivlary & Sorcery also do reasonably well at it. Several supplements for Hero System also have decent price lists. There are ...


26

In Adventurer's Vault pg 198 it describe uses for the Enchant Magic Item ritual: ... the ritual can also be used to place a property in a magic item that has no property, or to upgrade a magic item to a more powerful version 5 levels higher. This use of the ritual follows the same rules for enchanting a magic item from a mundane item but ...


24

Eberron has maglev trains Eberron, which was originally written for 3.5, has the so-called Lightning Rail, which is basically a magical maglev train. It’s a fairly major part of the setting, and certainly doesn’t ruin anything. Forgotten Realms and Greyhawk don’t have trains, or, apparently, mages who think As you say, considering the ...


17

The 3.5 Dungeon Master's Guide contains a small table on building costs. Page 101. But, for detailed guidelines on how to handle character-made buildings in 3E (including detailed cost and construction time rules), refer to the Stronghold Builder's Guidebook. It is a 3.0 book, but requires minimal updating. As far as renting goes... you could calculate the ...


16

I'll head to the Dungeon Master's Guide 2, chapter 5, section Item Components, page 146. A quick and easy way to solve your issue is suggested in the 4. Upgrade or Replace? subsection: 4. Upgrade or Replace? An item created using these guidelines could replace an old item. Or the process could impart a new power to an existing item, upgrading it to a ...


14

Yes, these and more are legal It’s fairly trivial to destroy the economy in 3.5. In fact, I have actually seen tables that basically assume that money is unlimited after a certain (fairly low) level. I’m not super convinced about the undead-squirrel-based factory, since Crafting typically requires checks that are beyond the abilities of ...


14

The money pumps as described are both legal and restrained. While SirPoley is writing high-opt, he's... very carefully not touching various "I win" buttons and most of his wealth comes from very simple arbitrage. His recent (and brief) dip into artificer failed to produce a number of objects of "I win" (slotless use-activated tatoo of chained shatter, ...


13

I like trying to get realism in my worlds and that includes economies. The best gaming source for this is HarnManor which, though nominally for Harn, has no real ties to that system - it's a toolkit with examples for generating a real fief/village/manor and its economy. I've used it in many a campaign. Chivalry & Sorcery is also a good source. I think ...


13

Consider the fact that there is no DungeonMart to go purchase supplies from. There are no autolooms to help weave fabric. No cotton gin to quickly process cotton into fluff. The process of crafting items was time consuming and labor intensive. Only the wealthy had any sort of real wardrobe. If an adventurer needed a back pack they would most likely need ...


13

I see no problem. Let's assume the characters are not essentially rich, they just have very valuable equipment. They could have stolen it, found it, or rewarded with it. Apart from that, they don't need to be very rich. If they want to trade their equipment for a cheaper one and buy a house or a farm (if they can), let them have it. On the other hand, ...


12

Someone did write a book about this! It's called Grain Into Gold: A Fantasy World Economy, and it answers all your questions to various degrees. If you're interested in learning more, this review archived by the Wayback Machine is very informative. It most answers your first question, by detailing a fantasy world economic model based on raw materials and ...


12

I used to play The Dark Eye (Das Schwarze Auge) myself and in my opinion it strongly resembles medieval Europe - apart from the obvious fantasy additions. It's rule books give information of the economy, trade and demography of nearly everything. Therefore the dilemma is quite understandable; in medieval Europe a sword was worth a fortune and in the world ...


11

I actually like HeroQuest's (the roleplaying game not the board game) method of economy better. You don't keep track of coins at all, rather you have an attribute that is your purchasing power. The more things you purchase in one sitting the greater the penalty to further purchases. Incidentals, like a drink and meal at a tavern, well below the purchasing ...


10

Fief and Town There are two great system-agnostic sources for you to check out. Almost all fantasy is based on Medieval Europe, and that's what these books are about. From the publisher's site: Fief: A Look at Medieval Society from its Lower Rungs is a sourcebook that examines the Middle Ages from the viewpoint of the ordinary farmer, priest, and ...


9

There are several ways to approach this. The most common and easiest is: Handwaving. In short, probably the traditional approach to this problem is to essentially ignore it. The peasant needs to offer a reward of 1000 Gold Pieces and it doesn't make any sense for his entire family to have anything close to that... well he does anyway. It's not realistic, ...


9

Yes, I believe this is possible to implement without “messing up” the established world as long as there are limits to its implementation and the factors below are addressed. First of all, any train would have to use old technology, and I mean OLD, by not even using a steam engine. Rather, have a couple of Golems (or similar “creature”) use a simple ...


8

The best merchant system for 3.X I've seen is A Magical Society: Silk Road by Expeditious Retreat Press. It is exhaustive in its treatment of trade goods. The best seafaring system I've seen is the Pilots' Almanac by Columbia Games. While for Hârnmaster, it is really a sub-system of its own that can be adapted for d20 use by remembering 5% = +1 on a d20. ...


7

Use Reign The company rules are perfectly suited to organizing groups and countries. I've successfully used the rules (including the resolution engine for country-level tasks) as a player in a 4e game where the players have founded their own city, complete with sub organizations like the thieves' guild. It will work better than any official 3.5 supplement ...


7

Well, your second question is probably the easiest to answer. I imagine that the price is the same as in the Player's Handbook (p.222), i.e. 5sp for a typical room and 2gp for a luxury room. The first one is tougher. The Eberron Player's Guide (p.13) tells us that the lower class (of which I guess a guard belongs to) has no more than a handful of silver ...


6

Relationships as Rewards Your awareness concerning the disparity-in-wealth issue might be more of a solution than a problem. While many GMs are looking for trouble for PCs to get into, you have already identified an excellent jumping-off point for all kinds of adventures. Poor NPCs will naturally seek help from characters that appear to have more ...


6

I am going to contrast with most of the answers and say "no". In the time of ancient Greece, there was a track that was used to bring boats across the Isthmus of Corinth called Diolkos that ran from somewhere around 400BC until "the first century AD". Meanwhile, between 80BC and 15AD lived a guy who created the Aeolipile which was a very rudimentary steam ...


5

In describing the setting of Eclipse Phase, the tension between economic systems is a major theme. The game describes a world that has recently reached post-scarcity (and even more recently undergone a huge catastrophe), where humanity has populated the solar system. Much of the game can be read as a critique of capitalism, and it is very well researched ...


5

They want the money to build a temple dedicated to their gods in their home village and .... carve their faces on a mountainside visible from a major city they were banned from, Mount Rushmore-style. In light of this answer, I wouldn't worry about the money directly. (Their faces or their gods' faces? Maybe have their gods' faces shining down on ...


5

GURPS Fantasy I know, it gets boring. Somebody asks, "Is there a good book about blank?" Then, inevitably, someone chimes in with "Yes! GURPS blank is awesome!" Sorry to bore you, but GURPS Fantasy, like practically all GURPS books, is a font of solid information for any game. How many game books will help you figure out what it cost to maintain your ...


5

There was a supplemental book entitled "Aurora's Whole Realms Catalog" which was kind of a shopper's guide to the forgotten realms. Wasn't a very thick book but it had common items and prices. You could use that as a base.


5

First of all, as someone else already wrote in the comments, ask yourself what you are trying to model, and if you really believe this will interest your players. I can think of a couple different approaches: Trading You want to involve PCs in running or working for a trading company. This can be the Merchant Guild, a minor noble houses, whatever... for ...


5

The problem with linking the EVE economy ( as an EVE player myself ) is that almost the entire economy of EVE is player-driven, with exceptionally little NPC interaction. The players also interact with the market on a regular basis, usually at least once per log in. This means that some players can dedicate themselves to the market warfare, while others do ...


5

I was going to comment, but it looks like it will be simpler to answer: There are deep problems with the backwards projection of a capitalist commodity economy with wage labour onto "low-tech, low-magic environments, similar to the authentic late medieval/early modern eras." There's a conflict between the desire to have "an economy" in your understanding ...


5

I'm afraid have to say that you probably shouldn't worry too much about messing up the economy, because 3.5 doesn't actually have one. That might sound odd, given that there's prices for almost everything listed in the rules, but 3.5 doesn't really attempt to model how gold moves around, except in terms of how it enters and leaves the possession of ...



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