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8

Tradition The relative values are based upon tradition ... the prices are very similar to Gygax's own list in the AD&D rules, which is an expansion of the material in the original D&D game. Gary Gygax, however, probably did not make them up on the spot. In comparing various price lists in various games, Gary's numbers routinely come up around 1gp ...


1

Question: What's a gold piece really worth? Short answer: That depends on where are you, and when you are in your game setting. The worth is influenced by how much "the game economy" interests the players and the GM. Longer Answer with an RAW reference. Regarding your included question on "abnormal prices" why not consider the following from the PHB as ...


3

Most of the answers seem to be going by the purchasing power route, but to answer it by the simple expedient of what that amount of gold is worth: Per the PHB, 50 coins weigh a pound. One common (avordupois) pound is 14.6 troy ounces (the unit used for measuring precious metals.) Therefore one gold piece is .292 troy ounces of gold. At the time of writing ...


4

All of these answers have looked at the value of the gold piece as currency. For my take on this see my answers to: Is there an effect on player's reaction to treasure when raising the value of gold relative to other coins?, and Without a magic item economy, what is gold for? The value of a gold piece, like the value of a dollar, is equal to what ...


21

D&D doesn't use a functioning economy - prices are instead set for game balance. Why does a whip cost as much as a goat? Because the designers figured that was a good cost for both. You can carry a pile of swords into town, only get 50% of their value, but the price to buy a sword doesn't change - because the designers don't want you playing merchant. ...


65

It's nearly impossible to put a modern world value on 1 GP ...because things don't have the same relative values in our world as they do in a typical medieval-style adventuring world that is pre-industrial, but has magic. As you've already noted, 1 GP is worth about 1 goat or about 1 whip. It's also good for 2 nights' stay in a modest inn, or 5 gallons ...


3

It's hard to directly compare value, because some things are much cheaper in the modern economy. See, for example, a sheet of paper (0.4gp each). However using the 'armour standard', a full suite of plate today will set you back around £5750 (~$9000) for a '1500gp' suit of armour. That puts the GP to dollar ratio at about 6. But a goat — you can get a ...


15

It's A Currency Not a Commodity You can look at the gold piece (GP) kind of like the American Dollar. It has whatever value people assign to it. The goal of having a currency is to give a universal portable way to conduct transactions. In the D&D universe gold is that currency. There are a few abstractions though. Universal value For ease of use the ...


7

Basically, the Gold Piece (GP) has been the standard unit of currency in D&D since the beginning. Why? Because something had to be. You should also note that historically, the GP was used as a measure of weight (IIRC, 10 GP weight was 1 pound). Also, back when TSR published the books as stone tablets (joke here guys. Obviously they never did that), you ...


35

1gp is 1gp is 1gp. 1 gp is worth 10 sp, 50 ep or 100 cp. That's it. Gold is defined to be worth that amount, and that's all there is to the economy in D&D. Though the specific items that you can purchase differ widely, the prices are set by the designers. So an item that costs 1gp has the same worth in the economy as another item that costs 1gp. ...



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