New answers tagged

2

I ended up playing on a map instead of using the normal mapless chase sequence and running everything in combat. The same can be adapted to stock 5e's chase rules; instead of rolling d20 for complications each turn, mark out a train car boundary every 60' and deal with skill checks depending on the location and status of players as laid out below. Define ...


5

Ahh, Chase scenarios; those are often tricky. If you have any experience with 4th Edition though, they become less so. True, that 4th edition and 5th edition rules and dynamics are quite different, but there is much that can be sampled and converted. On page 252 of the 5E DMG (Dungeon Master Guide) you will find the rules on 'Chases' , and this leaves ...


5

DDEX3-5, "Bane of the Tradeways," has what you need, at pp.11-13. You can purchase it at Dungeon Master's Guild for a few bucks, or if you're an Adventurer's League GM you can still (Jan 2016) download it for free as usual. The module features an extended chase+combat scene, jumping from carriage to horse, damage to vehicles, multiple factions, &c. ...


1

Trying to keep things simple, you need to present the players with choices that cannot be resolved by simply asking their character "what's the smartest thing to do here, given everything you know about wilderness survival?". When you make a roll, you're counting on the character to do the right thing. When you force a decision to the player, you make it ...


1

I'v seen some fairly long answers here (most of which are very spot on and clearly explain various ideas/etc). I wanted to through out a quick list of options and thoughts on how I personally would deal with these situations. Change what the rolls mean for the party. Yes, "survive roll" is always generally there but constantly change the meaning behind the ...


9

Your examples are good ones, it's all about the PCs having choices - immediate and longer term. I'm currently running a nautical pirate campaign and it was important to me that the actual sailing of the ship was a large and meaningful part of the action and not just a teleporter to some new location (and most of my players have read Hornblower, Aubrey, et ...


2

As with any game that represents any situation, the more you represent the actual situation in real game terms that resemble the situation, and present/allow different choices (and creativity), the more it will be like that situation, and the less gamey and artificial it will be. Characters can have attributes, skills, traits, equipment, supplies and ...


45

I used to play a game that was fun and exciting: you rolled a dice and depending on the result moved up some ladders or slid down some snakes and the first one to the top won, its name escapes me for the moment. It was thrilling and intriguing and then I turned 5 and realized it was no fun at all because I had no agency. My definition of agency is: ...


1

Let's consider a different question for a moment. Suppose I'm building a monster, and I give it a melee greatsword attack with +4 to hit and 2d6+4 damage. How much CR does that add? Well, it depends. If my monster was a huge dragon and it already had a bite attack that's way better than the greatsword, then the greatsword never gets used and it adds no ...


1

There is no value given; I argue the correct value is (-) Petrification is not listed among the "features that you may plunder from the Monster Manual. (DMG p.279)" So we've got to figure it out ourselves: Petrification may take an opponent out of combat. So, in their own ways, do the Vampire's Charm and the Roper's Reel features. (Charm by enlisting the ...


3

1. "is there a formula for using the CR?" No. As @Gregory and @Albert have pointed out, you've got to do the XP-math to evaluate the encounter against the guidelines. Luckily, tools like Kobold Fight Club, spreadsheets, and a head for numbers make it not too onerous to do this until you feel you don't need to any more. 2. "what is the range of CR that they ...


2

You could give it more hit points and AC, but that will simply make the fight longer, not more interesting. It might even make it less interesting for the players. What you should do is make the bigger landshark unique. AngryGM has written a series of articles on boss monsters. His take on the idea is that boss monsters have several distinct pools of HP ...


8

You have several options to advance monsters. Increase their HD in general Add class levels Add templates For a bulette, adding class levels doesn't make a lot of sense so we'll leave that one aside. Increasing HD is more than adequately covered (including the resulting CR) under the Monster Advancement rules available in your Monster Manual or on the ...


8

The sidebar on DMG 82 explains one important aspect of CR: a monster of higher CR than the party's average level is likely to have special features or damage output that is too much for the party to handle. A monster's CR is equivalent to its XP reward, which is used to build encounters. As MM 9 says, one monster of CR equal to the party's level is a ...


2

CR is only used for quickly compare monsters, which seems faster than comparing xp. Basically, then, is like a classification of how strong the monster is. What you need to use is the amount of xp the monster gives (which is directly related to the CR). Therefore, for designing combat encounters, ignore CR and take the amount of xp the encounter gives to ...


-5

The group has probably broken one or two laws, or at least can be framed. In which case, arresting them would deprive them of everything they have. Given their assets, keeping them in isolation might be justified. Also, depending on the law they've broken, or been framed for breaking, it might be justification for either keeping the characters in ...


13

Depending on how comfortable you are with ad-libbing... Make your Encounters Smarter It can be difficult to create more powerful enemies to challenge the players, especially for new DMs, but you can simply recycle weak enemies into more challenging encounters to add flare. 7-on-1 against a troll might normally lead to a gang-up; the party has numbers and ...


20

(First, 7 players is a lot, for an adventure designed for four. Consider that excitement during combat may be a matter of spotlight as much as it is risk.) You can do nothing. If you look at the character advancement table (PHB p.15), you see that the first few levels tick by pretty quickly, and looking at classes' advancement tables you see features ...


35

You should scale the encounters to increase the difficulty for your party. The ability to scale encounters to your party is very important when you do not intend on following a campaign to the T. The DMG actually clarifies how to do this for your party on page 82. Where it tells you how to gauge your party's difficulty rating by XP values. Within this ...



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