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3

Simply follow the DMG Taking a look at page 82 in the DMG, a level 8 character has 2100 as the Deadly threshold and 1400 as Hard. Multiplying by the party size, you get 14900 for deadly and 9800 for Hard, per encounter. This gives you about three encounters per session (possibly including two deadly plus some RP encounters). The 'Adventuring Day' xp table ...


4

Our group has rotating DMs with 4 separate campaigns, we can play about 3 times a month. As such, level advancement can be very slow. I wanted to tell a story that would allow the PCs to grow in stature without taking 5 years of real time to get through and which has significant non-combat action, so I simply doubled the suggested XP values. The result is ...


-1

If you're running a combat-heavy game, it will be difficult to come up with challenging combat encounters for seven 8th-level PCs without it becoming a slog. The problem with throwing more monsters at them is that combat becomes complex. The problem with throwing larger monsters at them is that in turn-based games like D&D, the side with more attacks per ...


27

Reward experience for completing goals, rather than just for killing monsters. Bypassing a trap, rescuing a princess, negotiating a hostage release, and stealing a gem big enough to bowl with are all actions worthy of rewarding experience. You should be rewarding the same amount of XP whether the heroes kill the monsters, negotiate for passage, or sneak by ...


2

XP is meant to be a guide. I suggest giving meaninful encounters instead of slogging through xp. But as a GM, you decide how to give xp and it doesn't have to be with 'monster xp.' You could set up some traps or a cool environment that the PCs must survive. That encouter with kobolds on a cliff face is surely worth more experience than the one with them out ...


18

Larger monsters. The truth is, the XP equivalent number of kobolds would overwhelm a group faster than a group of ogres...or dragons. Unless, the group is made up of tanks that kobolds will never hit. But, a large number of kobolds would be the slugfest you want to avoid. Look at video games...Diablo and Skyrim. Both of them start with small monsters that ...


3

There are no rules for increasing the XP for an individual monster based on the number of allies it had in the battle. However, there are clear rules about encounter difficulty. The gamemastering rules tell you that you should first choose an encounter difficulty (in the case of a level-2 party, you'd choose between CR1 and CR5). From that encounter ...


3

No Pathfinder encounter difficulty is strictly calculated as a sum of the encountered creatures XP. There are not multipliers to the difficulty based on the number of creatures (which I personally prefer). It is also worth mentioning that the 5e encounter multipliers are only used to calculate difficulty and do not modify actual experience gained. You are ...


1

Take for example 16 CR 1 encounters. This would net 6400 xp, or 1600 each for 4 members. Now take a single encounter with 16 CR 1 creatures, that's a CR 9 encounter and the same, 6400 xp. Depending on the equivalences, it may be worth less or more. Essentially, with pathfinder (or the UA Level Independent XP Awards in 3.5), the awards are the same. With DMG ...


1

"Goblin dice" describes your "less robust equilibrium" -- situations in which the randomness of dice rolls dominate over other factors such as strategy or story.


7

I think the most apt term is "power creep". It describes an escalation of powers, which have crept up on the designer and/or GM. It's a parallel situation to games (RPGs or card games or computer games or anything) where new better stuff is added, which leads to more things being added, which overpowers the original design. Quite similar to the GM whose ...


0

I think Bloat is the most appropriate word to use in this case. Where items are making either: HP Bloat : too much Health for damage done. DPS Bloat : too little Health for damage done.


31

Glass Cannon refers to characters built this way (usually deliberately) - extremely powerful offense, but very fragile defense in comparison. While they can deal exceptional amounts of damage and take out enemies in only a few hits, even normal enemies can do the same thing to them. Wizard archetypes often fall into this ideology. Power Creep refers to a ...


22

Rocket tag seems to fit this, and is often seen when talking about games with this kind of issues (Pathfinder, Exalted, WoD, etc). When both sides are made up of squishy characters and have extremely powerful guns, you have a case of Rocket Tag Gameplay. [...] The reasons for this are usually straightforward; attacks do about as much damage as you have ...


-1

Try to have one combat possibility per get together. Where DnD tends to go fight to fight with a little dialog to sell junk, CP2020 tends to be like a half hour TV show serial. In the 1980s, the A-Team tv show had one big combat and the rest of the show built up to it. When planning a scenario, plan an alternative scenario. For example, last week, the DM ...


0

I have also missed that in Strands of Fate. In general though in Fate-based systems the most determining characteristic is the value of the top skill. Typically players have a skill pyramid with a fix max value and that often goes for monsters as well. If the max skill of a monster is equal of the players one can assume that it will be quite effective in ...


1

In my opinion the key to such a scene would be power imbalances. Your set up appears to go into a lot of effort to set up the families as all equal, my suggestion would be to make more disbalances. Below is just one suggestion but you can fill other details instead: You set up the 20 ships 20 houses idea, I am not sure if you meant to imply each house ...



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