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Identical Enemies For groups of enemies consisting of a single enemy type, the books suggests that a number of enemies equal in both quantity and level to the heroes will provide a decent fight. "...for example, a 1st-level hero should find a CL 1 stormtrooper challenging. By extension, four CL 1 stormtroopers should prove challenging to ...


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The way I would handle it is not make the boss mechanically difficult (if you decide to stat him at all, nothing says you have to have stats for him), but make him incredibly powerful in other ways. Have him have vast resources, access to powerful magic, high level henchmen (who are statted out, but whose goals aren't to survive, but to do their master's ...


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Note: Most of the party have put considerable effort into optimizing their characters, if that might play in at all. While individual character optimization can make a considerable difference in effectiveness, it still pales in comparison to full party optimization (i.e. Radiant Mafia). Solo fights are often frustrating. If the solo boss is too high a ...


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An average L30 PC (assuming primary stat at 18, increasing it every 4 levels and a +6 implement/weapon AND the inevitable relevant Expertise feat) will be aiming at about +32 to hit a NaD. L30 monsters will have NaDs ranging from around 42 to 44, generally. This means I need about a 10 or a 12 on my attack roll to hit. (realistically, it's going to be lower ...


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Very roughly, although this is certainly not true for all levels (see Kobold Fight Club), a creature is a medium challenge for four PCs of the same level as its CR. For example, a CR 3 creature is a medium challenge for 4 level 3 PCs. By this metric, a player should be worth about 1/4 of a monster with a CR of their level. We could therefore say that a ...


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Use NPCs as Guidelines Take a look at the Monster Manual's Appendix B: Nonplayer Characters (page 342). While not a perfect match, it does give approximate statistics for a wide variety of humanoids with class levels. To extrapolate an actual challenge rating, you'd have to multiply one on-level character by the number of characters you're using, per the ...


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If you want something definitive, stat up the PCs as if they were monsters The DMG contains rules for creating "monsters" and evaluating their challenge ratings based (mostly) on: their HP their AC the amount of damage they do in a round their attack bonus ...plus some tweaks for certain special abilities. There is a section in there about generating ...


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I have a little experience with this exact situation. A GM once (long ago, in AD&D) threw a duplicate party at a group I was in. We won, but mostly because of dice; two of us were killed out of 5 PCs. In general, evil duplicates may be more likely to go for immediate kills, a GM group probably "knows" they don't need to hold anything back for a follow-...



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