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3

As defined in the Pathfinder SRD: An encounter is a short scene in which the PCs are actively doing something. Examples of encounters include a combat with a monster, a social interaction significant to the adventure’s plot, an attempt to disarm a trap, or the discovery of a mystery or clue requiring further investigation. So, unless the whole level of ...


0

I've come up with a tangled bit of logic that might at least put you within a reasonable range. Please note that I've never actually played an encounter calculated this way, so I have absolutely no idea how it would work in the wild. A Deadly encounter has a "substantial chance of character death" A character fighting an exact duplicate of itself would ...


2

This is definitely the purview of the DMG, but there are some details you should know. A CR 7 is a monster that will pose a moderate challenge to a party of Level 7 characters. This is mostly measured in the amount of damage it can do and the number of hit points it has (those are the things that scale with level/CR), A CR 7 monster is worth 2900 XP. A ...


4

The basic chart for CR to XP appears in the Basic Rules; specifically, there is a chart on page 5 of the Basic rules for DMs. However, there are no rules about designing monsters — or class-leveled NPCs — yet. Presumably those will come in the DMG. In the meantime, you can reverse engineer to some degree. Probably your best best is to look at existing ...


9

Use the skill challenge mechanic. Decide the level and difficulty of the encounter, and then consult the table in the Rules Compendium for the correct number of successes before 3 failures. That really just leaves which skills you want your PCs to use. Endurance is a clear primary skill. I like Sandwich's idea of inflicting a penalty on a failed check, ...


-1

Due to my unfamiliarity with DND 4th Edition I'm going to give you a system agnostic answer. Assign each of the "bad guys" who your PCs will be drinking against a modifier from -5 to +10 on their rolls to resist the effects of alcohol. The ones with the low modifier would be the lightweights who can't hold their drink. Give the ones who you intend to be ...


0

Since the problem is in combat, I have two solutions to make combat more dangerous. Use flanking and the help action to make mooks a bigger threat. Instead of trying to swarm your enemies with attacks in the attempt to hit someone with a natural 20 for measly damage, try to get a decent hit chance on your champion(s) Buff the opposition. Use magic to buff ...



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