Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

As you are playing pathfinder one additional option would be present if you have access to the book "In the company of dragons" by rite publishing. It is a book that allows for dragons as being normal player characters with them having comparative starting values to a typical normal species and having the chance to gain draconic powers by leveling in special ...


-2

Why don't you just make a human disguised as a fake dragon.


3

All the other answers are suggesting that to defeat the dragon the PC's need to hack it to pieces by themselves. There are many other ways of 'defeating' an opponent. The shapeshifted dragon is plotting in the courtly circles, trying to seduce the king's daughter. A nearby town wants to drive the dragon away, rescue the slaves and steal the treasure. But ...


4

Go with the 16 HP dragon In Dungeon World, a dragon has only 16 HP. This may actually be less than that of a really tough starting character. The dragon is still a terrifying creature, though, because it's hard to hurt, it can fly, breathe fire, and lay waste to the entire countryside. Keep in mind that Smaug, the most famous dragon in fiction who ...


4

Part of the core issue in an RPG is to maintain an illusion of the game world being real. Making a "real dragon" be something that your party of six level 3-4 characters can defeat has impact on the world game fiction. It means that a "real dragon" is only as dangerous as other things a party of six level 3-4 characters can defeat. Mechanically modifying ...


11

You Just Nerf Them Adventures do this all the time. Take the creature you want and then weaken it. This can be via templates like Young or Drunk as @Aaron suggests. It can also be done simply by wounding it or messing it up. Take as an example the feared Crag Linnorm. Well, in the Jade Regent AP there was this variant "wounded" crag linnorm with missing ...


2

To add some ideas I haven't seen mentioned here yet: Illusory dragon; some spellcaster is running it from behind-the-scenes (I do see someone mentioned this idea) Sick dragon - I recently ran the Legacy of the Savage Kings adventure, which is for level 5-ish characters, but includes an adult black dragon which is afflicted by a disease which blinds it and ...


4

I'd probably go with a back story about the prisoners escape, how they were able to injure or poison the dragon ( poison neutralizing fire breath ability? ) as they were escaping, or which lead to their ability to escape. Perhaps they were able to collapse a portion of the roof onto the dragon, badly injuring it, or simply damaging its scales, creating a ...


2

The only thing I have to add to this that Hey I Can Chan and Aaron have not already said (edit: looks like Brilliand and I made this suggestion at the same time) is that you could do a "special" encounter. By which I mean there might be extenuating circumstances that make the fight easier. If you want, you could have a CR 9 blue dragon fight the party. ...


12

Put the dragon in a bad situation The dragon doesn't need to be able to lose in a fair fight if it doesn't get a fair fight. There are a few ways circumstances could conspire to give the PCs a significant edge: Have the dragon already be fighting something else when the players show up (something it would be able to defeat if not for the players' ...


29

The Dragon Needn't Be a True Dragon As Aaron's answer indicates, dragons that have appropriate CRs for the party will be at most Medium. Although that means the dragon could be, potentially, the size of a professional wrestler, for a dragon that's sort of... unimpressive. I suggest the following. Use a creature that could be mistaken for a dragon Were ...


14

There is a Wyrmling Blue Dragon that is only a CR 5 encounter that might suit what you are after more than redesigning a creature, though that is a very young, Small sized dragon that might not fit the backstory. If you need to design a monster that is meant to be a weaker/younger version of a monster you can also use templates such as the Young Template to ...


1

I like @waxeagle 's answer as the best, but here's another perspective from someone who ran a >2 year 4e campaign. It's OK for a fight to be easy. In 4e a player character is powerful. Really, from the beginning they're badass. A party of them working together are nigh-invincible. Isn't that part of the point? Isn't that part of the fantasy? Don't they ...


0

System-agnostic answer: Yes, as appropriate you can alter monsters to your needs. Now, this is assuming you are providing your players with a level-appropriate challenge. As the other answers have pointed out, single-monster combat is rare in 4.0, and they should be facing more than one challenge a day based on their party level, sometimes with a more ...


11

4e is a very tightly balanced game, and you generally shouldn't need to modify monsters to make them more difficult as they typically provide sufficient challenge when used properly. The following is some advice to make sure you are pursuing in order to provide balanced encounters: Monsters almost never appear alone. 4e is a squad combat game. Rarely, if ...


0

Let me tell you that for the same level of the creatures as your characters lvl, it's expected for them to have more than one fight "per day", so not as challenging as a Boss battle is understandable. Remember, your characters are there not because they are common people, but because they are great, let them feel their greatness and further involve in the ...


0

You may want to take a look at the encounter xp multipliers on page 57 of the 5e DM basic rules if you have not already factored this in. This is a big difference from 4e as simply adding up monster xp per character and expecting a moderate encounter will not work. You can easily create a deadly encounter with a total xp budget of 200 for a party of 4 ...


9

There are two components to building an encounter, I'm going to reiterate them even though you seem to have them, just so we make sure we're on the same page. These rules are laid out in the DM guide document of BD&D and should be much further expanded in the DMG. CR only sets the maximum (not minimum, lower CR critters are designed to challenge in ...


0

I go by the rules that it should be the xp the party needs to level as a "balance" and you can spend that balance on different CR monsters. I'm not sure if I just misunderstood you, but the CR actually is the challenge rating. A combined CR of 1 should challenge a party of level 1 characters. A single CR 3 monster should challenge a party of level 3 ...


3

As defined in the Pathfinder SRD: An encounter is a short scene in which the PCs are actively doing something. Examples of encounters include a combat with a monster, a social interaction significant to the adventureā€™s plot, an attempt to disarm a trap, or the discovery of a mystery or clue requiring further investigation. So, unless the whole level of ...


0

I've come up with a tangled bit of logic that might at least put you within a reasonable range. Please note that I've never actually played an encounter calculated this way, so I have absolutely no idea how it would work in the wild. A Deadly encounter has a "substantial chance of character death" A character fighting an exact duplicate of itself would ...


2

This is definitely the purview of the DMG, but there are some details you should know. A CR 7 is a monster that will pose a moderate challenge to a party of Level 7 characters. This is mostly measured in the amount of damage it can do and the number of hit points it has (those are the things that scale with level/CR), A CR 7 monster is worth 2900 XP. A ...


4

The basic chart for CR to XP appears in the Basic Rules; specifically, there is a chart on page 5 of the Basic rules for DMs. However, there are no rules about designing monsters ā€” or class-leveled NPCs ā€” yet. Presumably those will come in the DMG. In the meantime, you can reverse engineer to some degree. Probably your best best is to look at existing ...


9

Use the skill challenge mechanic. Decide the level and difficulty of the encounter, and then consult the table in the Rules Compendium for the correct number of successes before 3 failures. That really just leaves which skills you want your PCs to use. Endurance is a clear primary skill. I like Sandwich's idea of inflicting a penalty on a failed check, ...


-1

Due to my unfamiliarity with DND 4th Edition I'm going to give you a system agnostic answer. Assign each of the "bad guys" who your PCs will be drinking against a modifier from -5 to +10 on their rolls to resist the effects of alcohol. The ones with the low modifier would be the lightweights who can't hold their drink. Give the ones who you intend to be ...



Top 50 recent answers are included