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58

The rules as written for this, as taken from the DM DnD Basic Rules version 0.1 say: Typically, XP is awarded for defeating the monster, although the DM may also award XP for neutralizing the threat posed by the monster in some other manner. It doesn't specify how much of the XP you should award, so it is reasonable to interpret it as meaning you may ...


54

Yes. Your players should gain the XP for the encounter. From the "Beyond First Level" section of Players Basic: As your character goes on adventures and overcomes challenges, he or she gains experience, represented by experience points. A character who reaches a specified experience point total advances in capability. (Players Basic p10) XP is granted ...


51

As Ceribia referenced, RAW does not allow this. However, in this case I would consider it for four reasons. First, the Deck of Many Things is an artifact. Artifacts generally give the big flaming middle finger to RAW. It is what they are there for, to bend or break the rules in epic, awesome, or sometimes silly ways. Second, even up to level 24, 50K XP ...


38

No PHB p.58: A character can advance only one level at a time. If, for some extraordinary reason, a character's XP reward from a single adventure would be enough to advance two or more levels at once, he or she instead advances one level and gains just enough xp to be 1 xp short of the next level.


31

The reason only matters if it matters to you. XP is awarded for challenges overcome. Thus, if the troll presents a challenge both times, then yes, you should likely award XP both times. So lets imagine that the troll guards both sides of a bridge. You have to cross both ways. The first time, you outsmart the troll, but make not allowances for the return ...


26

Mearls wrote an article about Challenge Ratings that actually specifically explains the Ogre's Challenge Rating of 2: http://dnd.wizards.com/articles/features/building-adventures-0 The important bit for your question is: For example, an ogre is worth 450 XP and is a CR 2 threat. A party of five 1st-level characters should expect to face about 500 XP ...


21

Your weapon can be drawn before you go in. There's nothing to say that you can't walk around holding your weapon, though provision of light and carrying of gear are common reasons to have sheathed a weapon. (Social nicety is another.) When can you draw it? Out of combat you likely just declare your draw and GM says "okay." In combat, on your turn, you ...


19

Decisions are engaging This is true on every level: encounters (both combat and other wise), dungeons (or other local-level areas), campaigns, and adventures. Descriptions of settings and characters and the environment contribute to immersion and bringing the game to life, yes, but to be engaged with the gameplay your players should be making decisions. ...


15

If the party bypassed the encounter simply by picking right instead of left, I'd say no XP. If they worked out a tactic to avoid the combat, I'd give them full XP to reward creative thinking.


13

Your calculations are correct except that the average of 2 and 1/4 is 1 1/8 which still rounds to 1. However, on p. 237 of the DMG it says: Creating a monster isn't just a number-crunching exercise. The guidelines in this chapter can help you create monsters, but the only way to know whether a monster is fun is to playtest it. After seeing your ...


12

If I may indulge in a frame challenge. A group of wandering murderers who, without provocation, attack an intelligent sentient being deserve what they get. This is especially so since, earlier in the module: There are any number of ways that the party could interact with the dragon to their mutual benefit, albeit not without risk. From the Monster Manual ...


10

The party gains XP for defeating their opponent. To do that they don't necessarily need to kill him/her/it. They also overcame the obstacle when the enemy surrendered, retreated, got knocked unconscious, was banished to another plane of existence, subdued and captured alive or, like in this case, faked their own death. What matters is that the player-...


8

They should be spread out just a bit, but, yes, each gets it's 1d4 attacks at 10'. Thing is, Either everyone should fall, or only ONE party member should fall... If it's everyone, no one is getting more than 3 attacks, and usually only one, and running through is a suitable defense. If it's just one, a smart party has a tank or two up front. By this ...


8

Intent Matters This is a case that could easily be argued either way. I will address the second part of your question, about intent. Yes, intent matters, or at least a good case can be made that intent matters. TL;DR - if your players are meta-gaming, you are entitled to shut it down. The longer form of the argument runs as follows: Experience ...


7

Quentin has adequately covered the rules-as-written point already* but since the rules simply say you 'may', that doesn't really answer the question since it simply leaves it to personal discretion. The more interesting question is asked in your title 'should I award XP?'. XP has two functions in D&D: (1) it's a pacing mechanism - PCs get bigger and ...


7

If you are referring to Beasts, they are often Unaligned. From page 7 of the MM: Many creatures of low intelligence have no comprehension of law or chaos, good or evil. They don't make moral or ethical choices, but rather act on instinct. These creatures are unaligned, which means they don't have an alignment. In this case, I think that these ...


7

Two Encounters Means Two Experience Point Rewards Experience points are not some finite resource that every monster or puzzle has and then player characters "suck dry." Experience points represent the characters gaining knowledge and skill from their experiences. Is battling the troll fundamentally different than outwitting it? Would I learn something else ...


7

Spoilers of published materials ahead. Justification. That said, there are ways out of this dilemma. Humble brag about winning


6

Few creatures that the PCs encounter are single-minded killing machines, even for “monsters”. Animals are even less suicidally-bloodthirsty murder-machines. If you don't already know the attitude of a monster, especially of an animal, when the PCs encounter it (i.e., you haven't already decided that this wolf attacks two-legs on-sight because it's been ...


6

As has been stated the rule exists to mitigate potential game balance issues. In this case I would grant them the full amount of XP allotted in the rules ergo up to 2 level - 1XP. They take the difference and have them track it as a side pool of xp that they can use to mitigate xp loss only (e.g. item/spell creation etc). This way they are granted the full ...


6

You're not required to give the monsters treasure. If it doesn't make sense for the monsters to have treasure, don't give them any. The players will at least receive XP. However, if you want to reward the players further, you can do that if you get a little crafty. Firstly, you can have the monster's lair somewhere nearby. Should your adventurers consider ...


6

They get experience twice A slight tweak to your hypothetical shows why. They defeat the troll by outsmarting him; gaining XP. Disgraced, the troll King exiles him and appoints a new bridge troll. When they defeat this troll by killing it the party gets XP, yes? The only difference is that these are different trolls; if they get XP twice in my scenarios, ...


5

It depends on the goal and the alignment of the party. If they are really good and they know the thugs also bother the general public, they must be removed. So bypassing the encounter does not give them any XP. Unless of course time is an issue for their assignment. If bypassing the encounter saves time and this is helpful for their goal, award them full XP. ...


5

The Player's Handbook on Spot says The Dungeon Master may call for Spot checks to determine the distance at which an encounter begins. A penalty applies on such checks, depending on the distance between the two individuals or groups, and an additional penalty may apply if the character making the Spot check is distracted (not concentrating on being ...


4

It hinges on the word "defeat". Has the NPC been thwarted in his/her goals? Was s/he trying to block the PCs? If so, then I would probably give full xp. If not (eg, if the party were trying to kill the NPC for specific reasons of their own), then no: since the NPC used feign death to trick the party it could be argued that the party was defeated and no xp ...


4

I think if you are purely following RAW you will have to reward experience for both encounters. As you correctly did, you rewarded creativity for bypassing the encounter. If the party comes back to kill the troll later, you could perhaps change the rules of the encounter to better solve your problem (depending on what you want to do). Perhaps another ...


3

I'm not sure if I'm reading it and running it right. Yes and No. As written, the fact that there is no clue to the players or the characters that there is something they should be doing is unfair. I think you may not have played the first round right though. The players are surprised and one of them has "been dumped". Now this is not a fall that causes ...


3

The encounter you describe is extremely deadly. However, Hoard of the Dragon Queen is not designed as a series of static encounters. Rather, the book generally describes adventure areas and the behaviors of their inhabitants. To quote designer Steve Winter: We didn't want to script NPCs' locations or motions. Guidance is given in certain cases; where ...


3

Short Answer: Abso-positively. Go ahead, weapon-walker. Long Answer The answer to this has more to do with why you would carry your weapon around rather than if you can. There are various reasons to do so, including walking around in a combat-heavy dungeon or expecting an ambush, but there are actually more reasons not to do so. The other two common ...


3

I don't know if there is an official answer for this, but if you can already see or hear the enemies coming then the encounter has already started and I'd say it's fair game to cast the spell and expect it to last until the encounter ends. This would presumably be at the end of combat, though it'd also end if you heard guards coming, cast the spell, hid and ...



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