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6

They get experience twice A slight tweak to your hypothetical shows why. They defeat the troll by outsmarting him; gaining XP. Disgraced, the troll King exiles him and appoints a new bridge troll. When they defeat this troll by killing it the party gets XP, yes? The only difference is that these are different trolls; if they get XP twice in my scenarios, ...


8

Intent Matters This is a case that could easily be argued either way. I will address the second part of your question, about intent. Yes, intent matters, or at least a good case can be made that intent matters. TL;DR - if your players are meta-gaming, you are entitled to shut it down. The longer form of the argument runs as follows: Experience ...


4

I think if you are purely following RAW you will have to reward experience for both encounters. As you correctly did, you rewarded creativity for bypassing the encounter. If the party comes back to kill the troll later, you could perhaps change the rules of the encounter to better solve your problem (depending on what you want to do). Perhaps another ...


7

Two Encounters Means Two Experience Point Rewards Experience points are not some finite resource that every monster or puzzle has and then player characters "suck dry." Experience points represent the characters gaining knowledge and skill from their experiences. Is battling the troll fundamentally different than outwitting it? Would I learn something else ...


31

The reason only matters if it matters to you. XP is awarded for challenges overcome. Thus, if the troll presents a challenge both times, then yes, you should likely award XP both times. So lets imagine that the troll guards both sides of a bridge. You have to cross both ways. The first time, you outsmart the troll, but make not allowances for the return ...


6

Few creatures that the PCs encounter are single-minded killing machines, even for “monsters”. Animals are even less suicidally-bloodthirsty murder-machines. If you don't already know the attitude of a monster, especially of an animal, when the PCs encounter it (i.e., you haven't already decided that this wolf attacks two-legs on-sight because it's been ...


1

an animal would start uninterested unless it thinks the PCs are dinner, if the players go out the way to attack the animal, it becomes hostile or trys to run away(your judgement)


7

If you are referring to Beasts, they are often Unaligned. From page 7 of the MM: Many creatures of low intelligence have no comprehension of law or chaos, good or evil. They don't make moral or ethical choices, but rather act on instinct. These creatures are unaligned, which means they don't have an alignment. In this case, I think that these ...


1

I can explain what you're missing. I wish there was a tl;dr, but CR is a complicated topic and while the problem you are having is not unusual, addressing it requires a great deal of exposition. The DMG's process for developing a creature is not what defines the CR of a creature. DMG p.237 clearly states that determining CR is not merely a mathematical ...



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