Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

It depends on why you're playing AD&D and what kind of game you're running. Do you and your group enjoy the challenge of tackling mundane problems in-game, like how to best navigate the Swamps of Miredom, whether to risk the mountain pass before the spring thaw, or where to find a buyer for a two-tonne gorgon carcass? If playing people trying to get by ...


12

I would call it at a 100 gems per pound unless you specifically state is a certain size (like the eyes of the Player Handbook Idol). Gems are weighed in carats and the problem is that the value per carat varies between gem types. Harnmaster is the only Fantasy RPG I know of that gives that information. Even armed with such information I feel it strays over ...


11

Since the rules are specifically mentioning weapons, armor, and equipment when it comes to carrying capacity it can be assumed that the character's body weight does not factor into carrying capacity. If body weight were to be accounted for, then most characters would need a strength score in the mid-20's at least to not be encumbered (at least based on the ...


9

The record cut diamond is 105 carats, and is a couple inches long, by about an inch wide, and about 1/3" deep... Records for cut gems in Beryl and Corundum run to about 200-300 carats... That covers most of the precious stones. Therefore, figure most huge diamonds should be under half a cubic inch; a typical sack can hold thousands. A 2' by 4' sack has a ...


8

Penalties I’m not convinced that dragging should involve the same penalties as being overburdened. Seems to me you can stop pushing or pulling at a moment’s notice, and then simply have some obstacle next to you (whatever it was you were pushing or pulling). I don’t think the lack of penalties is an oversight. Do note, however, that in the Move Actions in ...


4

Good question. I assume you mean Strength. The short answer is, no, you're character's own weight doesn't count against encumberance. Being unable to move at 0 Strength is probably a special case, like being at 0 hit points and being reduced to a partial action. I looked it up in the Pathfinder core rulebook, and it seems like it isn't well-defined. I'm ...


3

I don't remember exactly where I saw this, probably SRD or some obscure supplement. It's for D&D 3.5, but you can adapt the rule without much trouble for Pathfinder. While pushing/pulling/dragging something that's heavier than your max load, WITH NO WHEELS, the rules are the same as for carrying double max load (Max 5ft, no AC, no Running/Marching, ...


2

There are no specific rules mentioned about how it exactly affects you. I don't think the rules for lifting apply, as that's a very different type of strain and encumbrance on the body. My interpretation of the rules is that dragging more than a heavy load applies all the penalties for being heavily encumbered, plus would reduce maximum speed as ...


1

This blogger proposes a really interesting solution to the question: http://rottenpulp.blogspot.com.au/2012/06/matt-rundles-anti-hammerspace-item.html?m=1 In a nutshell, a character can have 6 "containers", each of which has 3 slots. The player defines his containers (sheath, strap, backpack, etc). Each item takes up a number of slots. It'd quick and ...


1

A simple method would be to set how many gems of a given size (very small, small, average, large vary large and huge) fit in a pound. You could easily do this by looking at gem sizes in a jewelry store and then using rocks of the same size. Once you know how many of size fit in a pound then all you have to figure out value of a gem type by size.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible