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25

While Pathfinder is great at letting the player know what's on his character's body and how much all of that weighs, it's not so good at measuring freight or determining weight and value of household goods. These are better off abstracted into just gp values and raw weights instead of individual fruits and vegetables. That is, if the players want to spend ...


21

It depends on why you're playing AD&D and what kind of game you're running. Do you and your group enjoy the challenge of tackling mundane problems in-game, like how to best navigate the Swamps of Miredom, whether to risk the mountain pass before the spring thaw, or where to find a buyer for a two-tonne gorgon carcass? If playing people trying to get by ...


20

I think you're succumbing to the temptation to think of the DMG entry as describing an item, rather than describing an aspect of an item. It's really not so much Mariner's Armor as Mariner's Chainmail, Mariner's Plate Armor, Mariner's Studded Leather Armor, etc., and they're just listed as a single entry to save space. Check out the DMG p. 139: If a ...


14

I would call it at a 100 gems per pound unless you specifically state is a certain size (like the eyes of the Player Handbook Idol). Gems are weighed in carats and the problem is that the value per carat varies between gem types. Harnmaster is the only Fantasy RPG I know of that gives that information. Even armed with such information I feel it strays over ...


12

Penalties I’m not convinced that dragging should involve the same penalties as being overburdened. Seems to me you can stop pushing or pulling at a moment’s notice, and then simply have some obstacle next to you (whatever it was you were pushing or pulling). I don’t think the lack of penalties is an oversight. Do note, however, that in the Move Actions in ...


12

How about one gem = 1 coin?


11

The record cut diamond is 105 carats, and is a couple inches long, by about an inch wide, and about 1/3" deep... Records for cut gems in Beryl and Corundum run to about 200-300 carats... That covers most of the precious stones. Therefore, figure most huge diamonds should be under half a cubic inch; a typical sack can hold thousands. A 2' by 4' sack has a ...


11

Since the rules are specifically mentioning weapons, armor, and equipment when it comes to carrying capacity it can be assumed that the character's body weight does not factor into carrying capacity. If body weight were to be accounted for, then most characters would need a strength score in the mid-20's at least to not be encumbered (at least based on the ...


11

Assuming the candles are cylindrical, they'll pack together in a hexagonal pattern. Given the dimensions of the candles and the barrels (which we'll assume are also cylindrical), see here for a formula approximating the # of hexagons which can be fit inside a circle. Multiple this number by the ratio of the barrel height/candle length and you should have a ...


11

The only figure I can find for half weight in the pathfinder source reference document is about armor fit for small creatures (which is smaller to start with and thus weights half as much as a medium-sized one). No official rule exists to my knowledge about halving weight by donning armor (and I'd be surprised if it existed). As SevenSidedDie points out, ...


11

There is no rule that applies any stricter carrying capacity for flying creatures, so you'd default to the standard carrying capacity on p.176 of the PHB. Picking up and carrying a character would fall under push, drag or lift, so it would be 30 times the pteradon's Strength score, or 360 lbs. At that weight, the creature's speed is reduced to 5 ft. Below ...


10

Yeah, there's a weird disjoint between the carrying capacity rules and the vehicle rules. The carrying capacity rules state that whatever your STR is determines your carrying capacity. For Large creatures, it's x2 that. And then you can drag x5 that. So if you have a 20 STR, for example, you could pull (133 lbs x 2 x 5) as a light load and a max of (400 ...


8

Take the rules at face value The simplest answer is: it becomes part of the Druid while in the Wild Shape form, and returns to its normal condition (loot, equipment, whatever) once the Druid reverts to humanoid form. It otherwise has no other impact. (As written). Is this a potential loophole or added benefit of the Wild Shape form? Yes. Is it game ...


7

AD&D was never that analytical - almost everything in it are rules of thumb and judgement calls.; there are virtually no formulas like you think there should be. What the book is saying is if a thing is difficult to carry because it is heavy then use its weight. If it is difficult to carry because it is big assign it a value based on what you think an ...


7

RAW, they weigh nothing in 4e. But for a more realistic estimate, we can look at other information we have about potions. I'll be using 3.5 SRD, because it's easily accessible on the web. (Potions don't weigh anything in 3.5e either, but there's still some information in it we can use.) The 3.5 SRD says this about potions: A typical potion or oil ...


7

Each item in the core books has a listed encumbrance value. A character can carry 5 plus his brawn score worth of items. An item emcumbrance value does not equal weight per se, but how much effort you have to make to carry it around without trouble. And by trouble i mean one setback (black) on all checks related to agility or brawn. If you go above twice ...


6

100 pounds, per Ultimate Equipment. Technically that's for a 10x10 tapestry, so you can do Math (tm) and determine yours is 75 lbs if you'd like. Real tapestries were wool and heavy by design, not like cheap modern cotton reproductions. There's no set cost, just like there's no cost for "a painting" or "a gem." It depends how rare and fine it is. I'm ...


5

I would abstract the whole thing into weight and not worry about details at all to make sure this does not impact on gameplay greatly. By the rules a barrel contains 650 lbs, costs 2 GP and weighs 30 lbs. Thus a medium wagon can carry 2000 lbs or ~2.9 full barrels of anything. The weight of the goods is ~1890 lbs and the cost of the barrels is 5 GP + 8 SP. ...


5

Enlarge Person: ... equipment worn or carried ... is similarly enlarged by the spell. The spell causes you to go up one size category. Since there aren't pre-existing rules for a character changing size category, it then goes on to mention how to apply that to a character - doubling height and multiplying weight by eight. Then at the end of the spell ...


5

First some data to get a handle on how much people carrying. I found this excerpt on google books where a newspaper stated that a porter was expected to carry 100 lbs for ten miles a day. In Andes regulations limit the weight porters carry to 20 kg or 44 lbs. The general recommendation is 20% to 25% of your body weight if you want to hike all day. Which ...


5

Yes, that is precisely it. The Heavy Load column on the Carrying Capacity table indicates how much your character can carry and still move about for long periods of time, even if his reaction time is slowed down and he cannot run. The maximum Heavy Load is his maximum load. In the Player's Handbook this is made clear in the first paragraph on page 162, ...


5

Summary Cargo in the dedicated cargo hold of vessels with that feature have special encumbrance rules: For listed equipment, there is a 10x packing rule (which I've seen proposed on various forums) for the dedicated cargo bay of light freighters. The goods stored in the cargo hold are difficult to access at all (possibly requiring skill checks if the ...


5

Unless the backpack becomes a creature unto itself (via something like animate objects) it does not have a 'maximum' weight. Mostly because going down to that granular a level for random equipment is generally not worth the effort it would take. And, as you, yourself, pointed out, different materials can weigh different amounts, so there is no "standard" ...


4

Unlike many other “retroclones,” OSRIC is not actually made to be played on its own, but rather used only as a reference for adventure and supplement designers who want to indicate compatibility with AD&D but, for whatever reason, want to avoid using the name. The existence of OSRIC allows these publishers to state compatibility with “...


4

Good question. I assume you mean Strength. The short answer is, no, you're character's own weight doesn't count against encumberance. Being unable to move at 0 Strength is probably a special case, like being at 0 hit points and being reduced to a partial action. I looked it up in the Pathfinder core rulebook, and it seems like it isn't well-defined. I'm ...


3

I don't remember exactly where I saw this, probably SRD or some obscure supplement. It's for D&D 3.5, but you can adapt the rule without much trouble for Pathfinder. While pushing/pulling/dragging something that's heavier than your max load, WITH NO WHEELS, the rules are the same as for carrying double max load (Max 5ft, no AC, no Running/Marching, ...


3

There is no rule. The "push, drag or lift" phrase assumes that the creature is standing on solid ground. There is nothing in the text to suggest that it was intended to apply to flying movement, and the physics of lifting a heavy object while standing is entirely different than the physics of flight. A locomotive engine, for example, can easily pull a ...


2

There are no specific rules mentioned about how it exactly affects you. I don't think the rules for lifting apply, as that's a very different type of strain and encumbrance on the body. My interpretation of the rules is that dragging more than a heavy load applies all the penalties for being heavily encumbered, plus would reduce maximum speed as ...


2

All purposes, period. Say an armor crystal can only go on light armor: does that fall under the category of “movement or other limitations”? Yes, it does: it’s a limitation on the armor’s ability to carry this armor crystal. Anything that is restricted to a particular weight class of armor is affected by mithral. In effect, mithral breastplate is a light ...


1

This URL: http://www.wayfair.com/Fine-Art-Tapestries-Celtic-Tapestry-3436-WH-FAT2469.html offers for sale a 15 sq ft tapestry which weighs 4 pounds (5 including the rod at the top). It sounds like the tapestry you describe is five times as large, and it might be difficult to fit the rod in the character's pack. As to the price of your tapestry, let me ...



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