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4

The short answer is that everything a character owns and goes adventuring with is either worn like armor, strapped to your belt like your sword or belt pouch, or attached to your backpack. The long answer goes something like this: Light armor is typically worn underneath clothes, because most people in light armor want to conceal the fact that they are ...


-4

I don't know if it's still around in 5e but when I used to play 3.5e, I always used a Handy Haversack. It holds a bunch of stuff in a magical pocket dimension (sort of like a portable hole or bag of holding), and includes the ability to immediately access whatever you are trying to get out, as a free action.


6

Horses are kind of expensive, but a mule costs 8 gp. Even a poor party can afford one. It can carry 480 lb of stuff, which you can put in a bunch of 1 cp sacks you strap on the mule. If that's not enough, you can buy a 15 gp cart that the mule will pull. That allows the mule to pull 2200 lb of stuff instead. Of course, don't forget to feed the mule. Feed ...


3

First of all, yes, you wear your clothing under your armor and your armor goes on your body. So however much weight those things take up, you can account for that being 'worn' (Or set off to the side when resting). There are in fact scabbards for your sword and quivers for your ammo, and most of those are low-or-negligible weight as well. Your 25-lb ...


33

Assuming, as you've requested, that "that's boring, don't track it" is off the table, then yes, your intuition is right: this is a logistics problem. And to the contray, it is the bread and butter of many groups' style of playing D&D, with a tradition stretching back to the very first days of the hobby in the early 1970s. Liking these ideas and wanting ...


2

In this aspect D&D 5e assume that you are going to apply real world knowledge or use real world references if you care about the details of how to stow your equipment. The rules ignore specific placement in favor of just totaling up the weight and comparing it to your character encumbrance limits. Something that 5e shares with it predecessors. ...


14

Throughout history Infantry units have carried their full kit on their backs into battle. Any Infantry unit that is not mechanized (read: rides around in a vehicle) will deploy from a forward base and can and will do patrols and missions requiring them to be in the field for extended duration. When this occurs literally everything goes in a big ruck and ...


0

The thing that you're missing is, frankly, WOTC doesn't think this stuff is very engaging either, and knows that most people don't keep very close track of encumbrance. Otherwise they wouldn't do weird things like make a day's worth of dry rations two pounds. This isn't related to 5E, but in Pathfinder, grappling hooks are four pounds. That is monumentally ...


3

Unfortunately, we won't see these guidelines (unless part of them show up in the previews), until the DMG. So I can state confidently, that these rules do not exist in official published materials. For now that treasure generator looks like a pretty solid option. With respect to creating your own shops, unfortunately, the economy is based around magic ...


8

Equipment takes damage under a variety of circumstances, but most of the circumstances are rare unless a character devotes resources to breaking things Such a character might... sunder a item held or worn by a foe. The character picks the item to sunder. If the sunder attempt is successful, determine if the item breaks by consulting Damaging Objects. The ...


4

Generally, gear doesn’t break unless something explicitly says so. Sunder explicitly involves attacking equipment. Various spells also explicitly mention damaging equipment. Firearms can misfire, as explicitly described under their rules. Equipment with the Fragile property also have an explicit chance of breaking. But without such explicit mentions, gear ...


4

Ask yourself the following questions: Is there a logical reason the character shouldn't have such a thing? Does lack of such a thing have a direct mechanical relation to combat (what your players are apparently at your gaming table for)? Is there an in character reason they should not have a thing? (They just escaped the prison, had all their gear stolen, ...


-2

If the people not buying gear did so to get a money advantage, then punish them, don't reward players who do follow the rules. If they ignored rations, have them weaken and eventually starve to death. If they ignore a tent, animals could steal their food, an ambush using bows is going to target the guy out in the open instead of the guy hidden in a tent. ...


3

Why don't you just ask them what they are sleeping on when night time rolls around. There shouldn't be much argument (tho there will be), when you give everyone without camp gear a -1 to attack rolls, or defenses if you choose, the next day for being stiff and sore from sleeping on the ground after a hungry night of not eating. There are two types of ...


1

Factor it Into Play Instead of simply giving a uniform 'minor boon' to those who come prepared for life in the rugged wilds instead of expecting to be provided for, work provisions into the fabric of play. Food and water, especially, can become part of the adventure, as the party balances their wish to travel lightly -- thus living off the land and the ...


57

What you're experiencing is a mismatch in what you all expect the actual game to be. As such, a boon will likely not make up for the confusion — at best it will be inexplicably ineffective at altering the players' choices, and at worst it will exacerbate the problem. Different games, same name You see roleplay and adventure in a believable world as the ...


5

Mage Armor The other option than the one Axoren suggested is to not worry about wearing armor at all. The first level Sorcerer / Wizard Spell Mage Armor provides a +4 Bonus to Armor class that even works against Incorporeal creatures, Making it better than any light armor that you could get at that level without providing any of the drawbacks such as armor ...


7

Become Proficient in your Armor It'll cost you two feats, but since you're a Rogue, it should only cost you the one. Light Armor Proficiency Arcane Armor Training Every turn, spend your Swift Action to reduce the spell failure by 10%. This would be great if it didn't require you be CL 3, which you will eventually be, but not realistically soon. Mithral ...


1

Nonsensically, It Can Be Based on ECL While Epiphanis's answer points to the Dungeon Master's Guide wherein it says that Many monsters advance by adding class levels (see the Monster Manual). To determine treasure for monsters with class levels, first give them equipment. Use Table 4–23: NPC Gear Value (page 127) and use just their class levels to ...


0

No, proficiency bonus never applies to damage The proficiency bonus is only applied to attack rolls, proficient saving throws, and proficient skills. Spells only deal the listed damage. Yes, as long as no cost is listed or the component is consumed According page 203 of the PHB... A character can use a component pouch or a spellcasting focus (found in ...


7

First, question 0. Does wielding your focus allow for your proficiency bonus to be added to your spell attack roll? No, you can always add your proficiency bonus to your spell attack rolls. The arcane focus allowing you to add proficiency was a rule back in the playtest which has now been removed in favour of allowing players to always add their ...



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