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4

Objects should remain for the scene, session, or dungeon at your discretion. To me the whole point of adventuring gear is to avoid niggling over who has what items in what quantity and the general problem of keeping an up to date manifest for every player in an RPG. It nicely expresses all of the usual and odd things an adventurer might carry and need in a ...


20

Officially, probably not... There are no precise limits provided that state exactly under what circumstances an item is attended, except that the item be "grasped, touched, or worn" (PH 166), and attending an item is the usual bar for determining whether an effect that affects only a creature also affects that creature's gear. (Further, attending an item ...


11

“You find what you need.” That is, you have an item. Items don't vanish for no reason and the move doesn't say it disappears later in a puff of smoke or otherwise, so you get to keep it. For the Word of Designer, Adam Koebel once answered the same question like this: once you pull something out, it's a thing. It's real. Add it to your inventory. ...


2

The basic rules are laid out well in wraith808s answer. But to sum up: Items may provide skill bonuses Item bonuses can be derived from quality/material and/or magical enchantments I'd like to add a point on the bonus stacking you mentioned... Infinite skill bonus loop? (Skyrim anyone?) Now, I see the problem you brought up in the case of smithing ...


3

The answer to the question at hand rests in Treasure Companion - Item #5811P (hereafter referred to as TC). You have to construct the item to be based on skill bonus, rather than weapon or defense bonus, which does involve more effort, and is specific to the item- rather than just automatic. First, let us refer to TC44 Objects — Objects are any items ...


1

Since you asked for previous edition rules that make this simple, I'll refer to 3.5, which has a handy table to handle this: http://www.dandwiki.com/wiki/SRD3e:Breaking_Items_%26_Attacking_Objects As you can see, the tables there provide you with a simple reference to shields, including shields made of unusual materials. This should provide incentive for ...


15

There aren't rules for how you're narrating combat, so there aren't rules for dealing with its aftermath. Consider that you may be over modelling what's happening in combat and causing more damage to the shield/gear than what's intended by the system. As Erik mentioned in his answer, there is an expectation that part of the rest time that adventurers spend ...


23

By default, it is assumed that he maintains the shield in downtime (ie; patches the worst of it during camp time and has it repaired when the party returns to the village). So yeah, he would have his shield fixed to new whenever there's a bit of time available. D&D by default does not have random gear disintegration rules. So in that regard I would ...


6

Crafting Mundane Items We know from the description of the Crafts skill that making things is an overcome roll, not a create an advantage roll: Overcome: Crafts allows you to build, break, or fix machinery, presuming you have the time and tools you need. However, it's usually not need to roll to see if you can actually create the item. The basics ...



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