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-3

I think that the intended purpose is to use your imagination. The bag of sand is just like the various trinkets you get, they don't have something built into the system for their use. Here are a few possibilities for a bag of sand: You can use it to exfoliate before going to a ball where you intend to assassinate a corrupt local merchant. You can use it ...


-4

Sand is remarkably useful for providing grip for hands or feet on icy or other slippery surfaces.


1

I have a wrong answer, but maybe a viewpoint worth considering for a house-rule. It'd be weird if, on pulling a heavy rope out of your pack, you should then have to add it to your inventory and count its weight. It's a movie-style trope to pull out useful one-shot things to resolve a situation. Very James Bond. Though it's an older trope than that, ...


15

The classic, cinematic use of a bag of sand by a scholar comes from the opening scene of Raiders of the Lost Ark in which it is used in an attempt to disable a weight-sensitive trap. Shame Harrison fluffed his roll. That said, D&D 5 harkens back to the era of having players find creative solutions to problems (as opposed to rolling dice to let the ...


1

What do you think about the use of it as "pocket sand". It's basically a bit of a joke, but it could actually be used as some kind of "weapon". It could be used against a number of enemies: Enemies with eyes, to blind them temporarily Enemies which are allergic to sand, somehow. It would be weak against (some) undead enemies, for example in case of a ...


39

Sand is one thing used by scribes to blot ink, so that a document can be handled or moved soon after working on it, without dripping or smearing. You can assume it sees use as a matter of course while the character is mapping a dungeon or composing a letter. Apart from that intended use in a scholar's pack, it can probably be put to many creative uses under ...


-1

This reminds me of the RAW arguments I've seen in the past: Player: "Well RAW says I'm not encumbered if I'm carrying 150 lbs of something." DM: "It doesn't matter, carrying 150 lbs of styrofoam will encumber you. It's too big to fit in your backpack and will require an acrobatics check to see if you can walk while balancing it on you. While you ...


15

5e does not have any limit on belt pouches. For that matter, neither did 3.5e; that one even had the belt of many pouches which contained no fewer than 20 pouches (10 of which were magically hidden, and all 20 of which contained extradimensional spaces à la bags of holding, but 10 of them are described as appearing to be regular belt pouches, albeit ...


4

Objects should remain for the scene, session, or dungeon at your discretion. To me the whole point of adventuring gear is to avoid niggling over who has what items in what quantity and the general problem of keeping an up to date manifest for every player in an RPG. It nicely expresses all of the usual and odd things an adventurer might carry and need in a ...


20

Officially, probably not... There are no precise limits provided that state exactly under what circumstances an item is attended, except that the item be "grasped, touched, or worn" (PH 166), and attending an item is the usual bar for determining whether an effect that affects only a creature also affects that creature's gear. (Further, attending an item ...


13

“You find what you need.” That is, you have an item. Items don't vanish for no reason and the move doesn't say it disappears later in a puff of smoke or otherwise, so you get to keep it. For the Word of Designer, Adam Koebel once answered the same question like this: once you pull something out, it's a thing. It's real. Add it to your inventory. ...



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