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65

The ultimate and most ancient point system for "quantizing success through a numerical method" is, of course, money. Or perhaps predating even that, number of cattle, sheep, size of land controlled, etc. And war and trade were very early human activities to optimize that quantized success. History aside, LordVreeg's answer above looks the most promising ...


58

The rules as written for this, as taken from the DM DnD Basic Rules version 0.1 say: Typically, XP is awarded for defeating the monster, although the DM may also award XP for neutralizing the threat posed by the monster in some other manner. It doesn't specify how much of the XP you should award, so it is reasonable to interpret it as meaning you may ...


55

In 'Different Worlds #3' (June / July 1979), Dave Arneson describes his adding experience points (and a few other ideas) to the Chainmail rules after he and Dave Wesley started playing a medieval version of Braunstein's games. It was certainly not in Chainmail and it was in the original OD&D booklets from 1974. So this makes perfect sense to me. It's ...


54

Yes. Your players should gain the XP for the encounter. From the "Beyond First Level" section of Players Basic: As your character goes on adventures and overcomes challenges, he or she gains experience, represented by experience points. A character who reaches a specified experience point total advances in capability. (Players Basic p10) XP is granted ...


49

As Ceribia referenced, RAW does not allow this. However, in this case I would consider it for four reasons. First, the Deck of Many Things is an artifact. Artifacts generally give the big flaming middle finger to RAW. It is what they are there for, to bend or break the rules in epic, awesome, or sometimes silly ways. Second, even up to level 24, 50K XP ...


47

I know of two approaches to resolving this issue. Give everyone the experience: Instead of giving a player XP if they write a summary, give every player XP for each player that writes a summary. This keeps the footing level for all the characters, but also encourages players to write summaries (and to harass the rest of the party about writing summaries). ...


47

The whole group divides the experience between them Each monster has an XP value based on its challenge rating. When adventurers defeat one or more monsters-typically by killing, routing, or capturing them-they divide the total XP value of the monsters evenly among themselves. If the party received substantial assistance from one or more NPCs, ...


41

There are no monsters or effects in 5e which drain levels/cause loss of experience. Most of the monsters we'd have once associated with XP drain now have attacks which will drop one's maximum HP. These include the demilich, specter, *cubus, wight, and wraith. A shadow has an attack which drops one's strength score. Even the Deck of Many Things, one of the ...


38

Punishment ... wait ... what!? RPG are supposed to be fun. From what is said, the games the GM wants to run and the one the players want to play are different. So, have a assertive conversation with your GM and agree on a game that you all want to play. Be careful to never criticise your GM personally, only things he has done. So never say BAD Your ...


37

No PHB p.58: A character can advance only one level at a time. If, for some extraordinary reason, a character's XP reward from a single adventure would be enough to advance two or more levels at once, he or she instead advances one level and gains just enough xp to be 1 xp short of the next level.


36

Your fellow player is wrong, and the book is right. You track total XP and never reset it to zero. This is the way it works in every version of Dungeons & Dragons.


36

You should give the players full experience for the creatures they kill. If using clever tactics results in a decreased reward, you are effectively disincentivising playing tactically and encouraging your players to turn every encounter into a straight-up fight. However, if you're going to be fair about the rewards of clever strategies, you should be fair ...


34

This system seems arbitrary to the player, because it is. There are no objective criteria to be met, and all the decisions are being made by the GM who already has huge power over the game. It's hard not to see not getting the highest reward as being snubbed. Which is not to say you can't or shouldn't ever award things this way: without trust in GM's ...


32

In this reply, I will attempt to address, solely at first, the "Boy Scout merit badge" subset of your question: "Did D&D inherit this concept from anywhere? Can plausible arguments be made to, for example, Boy Scout Merit Badges (where, from my hazy understanding, certain sets of merit badges are needed for advancement)". I will also proceed to trace ...


31

Going back in The Strategic Review, issue 2 (Summer 1975), I see an XP table for the Ranger class, which shows that experience points were in play in the original White Box. My copy of Chainmail is boxed up in storage, and it's a later edition anyways, so I couldn't tell you whether or not it had a point progression system for levelling up individuals or ...


31

The reason only matters if it matters to you. XP is awarded for challenges overcome. Thus, if the troll presents a challenge both times, then yes, you should likely award XP both times. So lets imagine that the troll guards both sides of a bridge. You have to cross both ways. The first time, you outsmart the troll, but make not allowances for the return ...


30

No, this isn't novel (although that does not mean that it isn't clever design in Numenera). There are two separate things married in that mechanic as you've described it. Both have been done before, and I can think of at least one game that has married them in the same way before. First there is the concept of a pull mechanic. Most GM-initiated events are ...


29

The relevant bit of the Pathfinder Society Field Guide: At character creation and each time you gain a level, you decide if you would like your character to be on the standard or slow advancement track for the entirety of that level. Primarily, the "slow" XP gain is so that you can keep playing with a particular character longer. Note that when you ...


28

Using Hero Points, an optional rule from the Pathfinder Advanced Player Guide, functions rather well in rewarding as well as encouraging awesomeness.


28

DMG p. 260 When adventurers defeat one or more monsters-typically by killing, routing, or capturing them-they divide the total XP value of the monsters evenly among themselves. If the party received substantial assistance from one or more NPCs, count those NPCs as party members when dividing up the XP. (Because the NPCs made the fight easier, ...


27

Same answer as to how to deal with characters levelling too quickly. Don't use XP. Just level the entire group at appropriate times - appropriate plot milestones for example. It removes a huge amount of busywork from the GM and players to calculate and award XP, avoids this problem entirely, avoids characters leveling at different times, etc. Our gaming ...


26

It does cause problems; not insurmountable problems, but problems The problem is that when characters get different amounts of XP, they end up with different levels. A level in 3.5 is unbelievably massive – particularly at higher levels with higher-power classes. For example, spells tend to grow exponentially in power – and if the sorcerer’s class level is ...


26

I am not particularly fond of playing one game session and going up a level. That hardly qualifies as "earned," to my way of thinking. (E. Gary Gygax as Col_Pladoh on Dragonsfoot forum) The above quote was posted 30+ years after the original rules were printed. It supports "designer intent" in this answer. Introduction For a point closer in time to the ...


26

No, as far as the rules are concerned, being knocked out does not affect whether you gain experience. The DMG has this to say about experience on page 260: Each monster has an XP value based on its challenge rating. When adventurers defeat one or more monsters-typically by killing, routing, or capturing them-they divide the total XP value of the monsters ...


25

If an XP reward doesn't fit, I'm a big fan of something in the story as a reward: An important NPC becomes a contact/fixer for the players (someone they can tap for information, rare items, warnings, work). Along the same lines, instead of a close contact with an important NPC, their actions have gained them audience with someone VERY important in your ...


25

First, I don't believe that "why" is something that this community can answer; this was a decision of the designers and their reasons, to the extent that they have any, are a mystery. Notwithstanding, your question is why the XP per level looks like this: Steady growth until 11th level, then a sharp drop and not reaching the 10->11 level again until ...


23

From the D20 Pathfinder SRD: At 4th level, a character can increase one ability score by +1. This is a typeless, nonmagical bonus that cannot be changed once selected. For example, a fighter with Dex 13 could use this bonus to increase his Dex to 14. A character can also increase one ability score at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 20th level; it does not ...


23

I need to reward them some other way. No, you don't. Are you actually having a problem where they're not doing those things? If not, then just don't. I actually had a long conversation with my players about this in a similar vein - I wanted to give tangible rewards for certain behaviors in game. They replied (to my surprise) that they don't like ...


23

Divide XP evenly. The level spread you're describing is pretty big; I generally don't have my players at widely different levels because of the survivability issue. New PCs get to come in at the average party level. I definitely wouldn't ever have the 10, 9, 8, 3 spread you describe. However, if you're in this situation, note two things: The fight is ...



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