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79

The GM taking away XP is not really your core problem. Your core problem is the game you want to play as a group is not the game he wants to run. The solution is simple - go find a GM who does want to run that kind of game, or have one of you GM (or take turns GMing) to run that game. Regardless of how "good" of a GM he is, he's not the GM that's good for ...


54

The ultimate and most ancient point system for "quantizing success through a numerical method" is, of course, money. Or perhaps predating even that, number of cattle, sheep, size of land controlled, etc. And war and trade were very early human activities to optimize that quantized success. History aside, LordVreeg's answer above looks the most promising ...


46

In 'Different Worlds #3' (June / July 1979), Dave Arneson describes his adding experience points (and a few other ideas) to the Chainmail rules after he and Dave Wesley started playing a medieval version of Braunstein's games. It was certainly not in Chainmail and it was in the original OD&D booklets from 1974. So this makes perfect sense to me. It's ...


45

I know of two approaches to resolving this issue. Give everyone the experience: Instead of giving a player XP if they write a summary, give every player XP for each player that writes a summary. This keeps the footing level for all the characters, but also encourages players to write summaries (and to harass the rest of the party about writing summaries). ...


36

Your fellow player is wrong, and the book is right. You track total XP and never reset it to zero. This is the way it works in every version of Dungeons & Dragons.


36

Punishment ... wait ... what!? RPG are supposed to be fun. From what is said, the games the GM wants to run and the one the players want to play are different. So, have a assertive conversation with your GM and agree on a game that you all want to play. Be careful to never criticise your GM personally, only things he has done. So never say BAD Your ...


31

Going back in The Strategic Review, issue 2 (Summer 1975), I see an XP table for the Ranger class, which shows that experience points were in play in the original White Box. My copy of Chainmail is boxed up in storage, and it's a later edition anyways, so I couldn't tell you whether or not it had a point progression system for levelling up individuals or ...


30

No, this isn't novel (although that does not mean that it isn't clever design in Numenera). There are two separate things married in that mechanic as you've described it. Both have been done before, and I can think of at least one game that has married them in the same way before. First there is the concept of a pull mechanic. Most GM-initiated events are ...


29

In this reply, I will attempt to address, solely at first, the "Boy Scout merit badge" subset of your question: "Did D&D inherit this concept from anywhere? Can plausible arguments be made to, for example, Boy Scout Merit Badges (where, from my hazy understanding, certain sets of merit badges are needed for advancement)". I will also proceed to trace ...


28

Using Hero Points, an optional rule from the Pathfinder Advanced Player Guide, functions rather well in rewarding as well as encouraging awesomeness.


26

The relevant bit of the Pathfinder Society Field Guide: At character creation and each time you gain a level, you decide if you would like your character to be on the standard or slow advancement track for the entirety of that level. Primarily, the "slow" XP gain is so that you can keep playing with a particular character longer. Note that when you ...


25

Same answer as to how to deal with characters levelling too quickly. Don't use XP. Just level the entire group at appropriate times - appropriate plot milestones for example. It removes a huge amount of busywork from the GM and players to calculate and award XP, avoids this problem entirely, avoids characters leveling at different times, etc. Our gaming ...


24

If an XP reward doesn't fit, I'm a big fan of something in the story as a reward: An important NPC becomes a contact/fixer for the players (someone they can tap for information, rare items, warnings, work). Along the same lines, instead of a close contact with an important NPC, their actions have gained them audience with someone VERY important in your ...


23

I need to reward them some other way. No, you don't. Are you actually having a problem where they're not doing those things? If not, then just don't. I actually had a long conversation with my players about this in a similar vein - I wanted to give tangible rewards for certain behaviors in game. They replied (to my surprise) that they don't like ...


21

Many modern games now have a concept of "do cool stuff points". Examples include Hero Points Pathfinder Advanced Players Guide Action Points D&D 4e D&D 3.5e Eberron D20 Modern Fate Points Fate Bennies Savage Worlds Image courtesy of F. Randall Farmer These are great because they give the players more power for a day, but don't ...


20

I hate to say it but I don't think it was for a game. I think it might have been for something called "College", where you get credits for tasks & defeating courses. "The idea of quantizing success through a numerical method" applies to a lot of things, really. I swear no snark intended...Using Experience Points for a Fictional Avatar could totally have ...


20

There are three ways to approach this: Decrease the overall experience for each encounter (for example, only award 500xp for an encounter that would normally award 1,000xp "by the book"). Progressively increase the difficulty of later encounters (add monsters, increase monster challenge rating, or add environmental effects) to account for the higher-level ...


20

Really, experience points are just a game mechanic, used to incentivize and/or reward certain behaviors As noted in the passage you quoted, they are meant as rough indicators of the experiences that help a character learn, grow, and improve herself...but any close mapping to how real people learn and grow is tenuous at best. Would apprenticing with a high ...


19

If the EXP system isn't working for you, throw it out all together and hand out levels as you see fit. This can be done after x number of sessions or after some in game adventuring milestone. My group has done this for a while and have never had a problem. Pathfinder eliminated XP costs that DnD3.5 had so the only time XP is an issue will be when the ...


18

Docking XP isn't always bad, but here it indicates a problem I have played with DMs who will dock XP for breaking the social contract of the game—how we're all going to play together, why, and in what style. However, this only works when there is an existing group that knows how the group is supposed to play together, and the XP docking is there to ...


17

From the D20 Pathfinder SRD: At 4th level, a character can increase one ability score by +1. This is a typeless, nonmagical bonus that cannot be changed once selected. For example, a fighter with Dex 13 could use this bonus to increase his Dex to 14. A character can also increase one ability score at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 20th level; it does not ...


17

Yes, yes it will. I do have experience with BFRPG. It's a very tidy clone of Basic D&D with some nice mechanical bits from d20, but it's still very much BD&D at its core. (I have experience with that too.) Judging what feel and style of campaign you're going for by your question and comments, giving full XP for gold will level them too fast: The ...


17

Reward player-driven awesome with the same kind of awesome. The players are showing you, by their character actions, the kind of game they want to play. As DM, you have limited time and energy to keep things running smoothly. It seems from your question that adding some new number or thing to track/handle is not the kind of reward this group is looking for. ...


16

One-shot magic items (potions, scrolls, etc.) - they can even be pretty powerful and still won't unbalance your game for more than one encounter. If the effect is of a defensive/healing nature, it may even instead serve as an insurance against bad luck or decisions that might otherwise kill a PC (or the entire party).


15

Don't use XP. Just level the entire group at appropriate times. It removes a huge amount of busywork from the GM and players to calculate and award XP, avoids this problem entirely, avoids characters leveling at different times, etc. Our gaming group tried it once and never went back - it adds nothing for what it takes. We've run four full year+ ...


15

It's worth noting that other early games did not use XP. Timeline 1975 Tunnels and Trolls uses either AP (Adventure Points) or EP, depending upon edition. Runequest (1976) and Traveller (1977) didn't use experience points at all. 1974 & 1976 † Original Edition D&D doesn't use XP nor EP. Electrum are mentioned, but non-standard, and Experience ...


15

Ditching XP in D&D is one of the more common house rules. My experience with running 4e was that, pragmatically, it's better if all the PCs are the same level, which meant keeping the rewards the same. At that point, tracking XP just seemed redundant. We agreed to drop XP and instead level when they completed something important. Functionally, this ...


14

This is really up to you and how you want to handle your logistics. Strictly speaking, they should probably be awarded the XP immediately after successfully handling the encounter. However, look at your players, your play style, and your session flow to make the best choice. Over the years I've seen XP rewards handled the following ways. Immediately After ...


14

No, the end-of-session xp award if for PCs only. Extras advance in a different manner. SW Deluxe Edition p 43: Don’t create your Extras with the character creation rules. Just give them what you think they ought to have in their various skills and attributes and move on. While that says nothing about their advancement, it most assuredly sets a ...


14

According to the rules, the XP to be given to each player is the sum of the Monsters' XP, divided by the number of players. See the Dungeon Master's Guide page 120, under Earning XP: Characters earn XP for every encounter they overcome. The XP reward for completing an encounter is the sum of the XP values for each monster, NPC, trap or hazard that makes ...



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