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10

The Monster Manual II (1982) phoenix can, in fact, die normally from, for instance, attacks by +3 or better magic weapons or, instead, can suicide in "a double-strength (40th level) combination of fire storm (2" high × 5" wide × 8" deep) and incendiary cloud.... This destroys the phoenix but leaves a gem-like egg behind from which a new phoenix will arise ...


6

Defeating doesn't have to mean killing (even though it often ends up that way). If you can defeat a monster in a non-lethal way, then you still get XP for it.


1

There are three ways to deal with this. No xp: Since the threat was not neutralized in any way, you can choose to hold back on giving xp. This option is recommended if you intent for the players to go back to this confrontation. Partial xp: The players did something smart. They played their classes, took time to scout ahead and took appropriate actions to ...


-2

"Is there RAW justification that I should award XP as if they actually fought and killed the bandits?" I did not find RAW justification for awarding the XP and the 5e DMG on page 260 seems pretty clear not to award it. However, you are the DM, your table, your game, your rules. Also, take a look at the sections titled "MILESTONES" & "LEVEL ...


-1

I don't have a 5th edition DMG on hand, but I recall that in third edition, the DMG says that, on average, an encounter should consume 20% of the parties resources. Did that happen? If so, then it qualifies as a full encounter regardless of how much combat occurred. If not, then you might consider giving them a proportion of XP based on this (e.g. if it used ...


7

Quentin has adequately covered the rules-as-written point already* but since the rules simply say you 'may', that doesn't really answer the question since it simply leaves it to personal discretion. The more interesting question is asked in your title 'should I award XP?'. XP has two functions in D&D: (1) it's a pacing mechanism - PCs get bigger and ...


5

It depends on the goal and the alignment of the party. If they are really good and they know the thugs also bother the general public, they must be removed. So bypassing the encounter does not give them any XP. Unless of course time is an issue for their assignment. If bypassing the encounter saves time and this is helpful for their goal, award them full XP. ...


15

If the party bypassed the encounter simply by picking right instead of left, I'd say no XP. If they worked out a tactic to avoid the combat, I'd give them full XP to reward creative thinking.


58

The rules as written for this, as taken from the DM DnD Basic Rules version 0.1 say: Typically, XP is awarded for defeating the monster, although the DM may also award XP for neutralizing the threat posed by the monster in some other manner. It doesn't specify how much of the XP you should award, so it is reasonable to interpret it as meaning you may ...


1

The amount depends on how fast you want the PC's to advance, a slower progression means 10-15 EXP for a roughly 4 to 5 hours long session. While a moderate progression means about 20 EXP per session, meaning that they will buy at least one talent at the end of each session. And lastly, a faster progression is anything from 25 and up, but you should be ready ...


47

The whole group divides the experience between them Each monster has an XP value based on its challenge rating. When adventurers defeat one or more monsters-typically by killing, routing, or capturing them-they divide the total XP value of the monsters evenly among themselves. If the party received substantial assistance from one or more NPCs, ...


1

I can't find anything in the DM's Basic Guide about awarding XP, apart from the following sentence. Typically, XP is awarded for defeating the monster, although the DM may also award XP for neutralizing the threat posed by the monster in some other manner. My ruling is to award the XP to the whole party, working on the idea that they all contributed to ...


11

Typically, you do the following: Add up the experience that every monster gives in an encounter into one giant pool of experience. Divide that experience pool evenly by the number of people in the party. You do this for encounters where players kill off the monsters as well as encounters where they manage to defeat the monsters via other means (traps, ...


-3

There are two parts of answer to consider: The exact wording of rulebook (read it and see, if there is a rule for it or not) Real world experience and homerules I will talk about the second: In real world any animal (say from mouse upwards) can be trained to do some tricks, can take experience in fights and became better at it and can (with proper ...


8

NPCs improve only if the GM says so By default, according to Character Advancement, As player characters overcome challenges, they gain experience points. As these points accumulate, PCs advance in level and power. Emphasis mine. This means, unless the GM says the NPC does, an NPC (even an animal) neither gains experience points nor advances in ...



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