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9

As @Drunken_Guy already pointed out, the table you are looking for is on page 22 of the Player Handbook, however I usually found more useful to simply apply the formula: exp for level X = X * (X - 1) * 500 For example, if you need to now the exp needed for level 3 then exp = 3 * 2 * 500 = 3000 or another example, for level 9 exp = 9 * 8 * 500 = 36000 ...


9

The info you require are on the first pages of the Player's Handbook. In 3.5 (and I think in other editions as well), info is seperated in the books by the person they refer to. For example the experience points required to level up, is information that the players need and not the DM, that is why it is referenced in the Player's Handbook. This info is not ...


0

I have played in games (D&D-clones) where levelling up was at the whim of the GM. Eventually we gave up on the game because the GM was manipulating us into playing out his pre-planed story by only rewarding "correct" play. It certainly impacted player behaviour but frustration set in when the player's idea for the character didn't entertain the GM or ...


0

Gaming with or without Experience Points (XP) I have run games with and without XP, but it was driven by situational. XP gives a more definitive base for progress, non-XP gaming gave freedom from the table (paperwork and tracking details). When gaming on the fly in short segments of time, like when traveling or during a fifteen minute break between other ...


13

In 3.5, you gain experience for overcoming challenges, not for individual things you do. So a fighter doesn’t get XP for successfully attacking, a wizard doesn’t get XP for successfully casting a spell, and a cleric doesn’t get XP for successfully turning an undead creature. Rather, they get XP when their attack, spell, or turn undead ...


5

There's no standard amount. I D&D 3.5e XP is dealt for overcoming challenges, not for doing actions. If successfully turning those undead leads to their demise or lets the party otherwise "win" the encounter (for example by successfully bypassing it), you should get the XP those monsters were worth.


6

You are correct Lots - mainly trying to somewhat reconcile both power utility and rate of gain across classes Though 3e classes do diverge in power (see What are "tiers", and what tier is each class?), the goal was for them not to - this flows into the "unlimited multiclassing" 3e provided as well, where you could take a level of any class and ...



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